Grow Your Own Food

Grow Your Own Food

Growing your own vegetables, fruits and herbs is an excellent way to be active and eat healthy at home! UD Extension has the resources to help you get started with your own garden.

Learn How to Grow Your Own


All Results

Clear All Filters

Sorry, no results found.

  • Arugula

    • Eruca sativa, Arugula
    • Brassicaceae family (mustards)
    • Sunlight: full sun. Light shade may help slow bolting.
    • Soil conditions: rich, well-drained soil.
  • BEANS

    BEANS: General information- Phaseolus vulgaris, Beans, Fabaceae family, full sun, well-drained, fertile soil.

  • BEEFSTEAK TOMATOES

    BEEFSTEAK TOMATOES: General information- Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato Solanaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Tomatoes come in both determinate (bush) varieties and indeterminate (climbing) varieties.

  • BEETS

    BEETS: General information- Beta vulgaris, Amaranthaceae family, full sun, fertile, evenly moist soil, free of rocks. Beets need cool temperatures to germinate and grow.

  • BROCCOLI

    BROCCOLI: General information- Brassica oleracea var. botrytis, Brassicaceae family, full sun. Can tolerate light shade but will slow maturity. Requires well-drained, fertile soil high in organic matter. Needs plentiful, consistent moisture.

  • BRUSSEL SPROUTS

    BRUSSEL SPROUTS: General information- Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera, Brassicaceae family, full sun, consistently moist, fertile soil. Can be harvested as stalks or as sprouts.

  • Basil

    BASIL: General information- Ocimum basilicum, Lamiaceae family, full sun, well-drained soil, high in organic matter. Grows well in a container. Annual

  • CABBAGE

    CABBAGE: General information- Brassica oleracea var. capitata, Brassicaceae family, full sun. Can tolerate light shade but will slow maturity. Light shade can be beneficial in warm weather. Prefers well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter.

  • CARROTS

    CARROTS: General information- Daucus carota var. sativus, Umbelliferae family, full sun. Will tolerate very light shade. Good quality roots require plentiful moisture, well-drained soil that is deep, loose, free of stones and high in organic matter.

  • CAULIFLOWER

    CAULIFLOWER: General information- Brassica oleracea var. botrytis, Cauliflower, Brassicaceae family, full sun. Light shade. Can tolerate light shade but will slow maturity. Requires well-drained soil. Prefers fertile soil high in organic matter. Needs plentiful, consistent moisture.

  • CHERRY TOMATOES

    CHERRY TOMATOES: General information- Solanum lycopersicum, TomatoSolanaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Tomatoes come in both determinate (bush) varieties and indeterminate (climbing) varieties.

  • CHIVES

    CHIVES: General information- Allium schoenoprasum, Amaryllidaeae family, sun and part shade, well-drained soil, rich in organic matter. Grows well in a container. Perennial.

  • CILANTRO

    CILANTRO: General information- Coriandrum sativum, Apiaceae family, full to part sun, loamy, well-drained soil. Cilantro (leaves) Coriander (seeds). Grows well in a container. Annual.

  • COLLARDS

    Collards: General information- Brassica oleracea var. acephala, Brassicaceae family, full sun. Prefers full sun in spring but can benefit from light shade during hot weather. Requires well-drained soil. Prefers well-drained, fertile soil high in organic matter.

  • CONSIDER A VEGETABLE GARDEN THIS YEAR

    How much time do you have to plant, weed and harvest in your garden? A small garden is best for beginners. Go bigger as your skills and time increase. Do you have a sunny spot? Most vegetables require 6 to 8 hours of sunlight. Vegetables prefer loose, well drained soil; rich in organic matter (compost).

  • CUCUMBER

    CUCUMBER: General information- Cucumis sativus, Cucurbitaceae family, full sun, well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter.. Vining and bush varieties. Bush varieties grow well in a container.

  • DILL

    DILL: General information- Anethum graveolens, Dill, Apiaceae family, full sun. Grows best in loamy, well drained soil but can grow in poor soil. Grows well in a container. Annual

  • EGGPLANT

    • Scientific Name: Solanum melongena
      • Family: Solanaceae
    • Warm season
    • Planting Window: 
      • Start seeds under lights indoors in mid-March for transplanting
  • Fall Cover Crops

    During spring and throughout the summer, gardeners are busy harvesting from crops that were planted in their gardens. Our garden soils provide an abundance of harvested peas, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes, sweet corn, yellow squash, zucchini, basil, zinnias and many other vegetables and flowers. 

  • HEIRLOOM TOMATOES

    HEIRLOOM TOMATOES: General information- Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato Solanaceae family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Tomatoes come in both determinate (bush) varieties and indeterminate (climbing) varieties.

  • KALE

    KALE: General information- Brassica oleracea var. acephala, Brassicaceae family, full sun to part shade. Prefers full sun in spring and fall, but can benefit from light shade during hot weather. Prefers well-drained, fertile soil high in organic matter. Needs plentiful, consistent moisture.

  • KOHLRABI

    KOHLRABI: General information- Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes(Kohlrabi) Brassicaceae Family, full sun. Tolerates light shade. Prefers well-drained, fertile soil high in organic matter.

  • LAVENDER

    LAVENDER: General information- Lavandula angustifolia, Lamiaceae family, full sun, low fertility, well-drained soil. Grows well in a container. Perennial

  • LEAF LETTUCE

    • Scientific Name: Lactuca sativa
    • Family: Asteraceae
    • Cool season
    • Planting Window:
      • Spring: mid-March to late April
  • LEEKS

    LEEKS: General information- Allium ampeloprasum, Allium family, full sun, well drained soil, high in organic matter. Best grown as a transplant. Blanch with soil to increase white shanks.

  • LETTUCE

    LETTUCE: General information- Lactuca saliva, Asteraceae family, full sun but can tolerate some shade, especially in the summer, moist, well-drained soil. Butterhead, Crisphead, Romaine, Looseleaf varieties.

  • LIMA BEANS

    LIMA BEANS: General information- Phaseolus lunatus, Lima Bean, Fabaceae family, full sun. Soil conditions: loose, evenly moist, well drained soil. Bush and pole varieties.

  • MELON

    MELON: General information- Cucumis melo, Melon, Cucurbitaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: fertile, well-drained soil.Can be grown on a trellis.

  • MINT

    MINT: General information- Mentha sp., Mint, Lamiaceae family, Sunlight: full sun to part shade. Soil conditions: rich, moist, well-drained soil. Grows well in a container. Perennial, wide spreading, can become invasive.

  • ONION

    Onion: 

    • Scientific Name: Allium cepa
      • Family: Alliaceae, Amaryllidaceae
    • Cool season
    • Planting Window: mid-March to mid-April
    • pH = 5.5-7.0
  • ONIONS

    ONIONS: General information- Allium cepa, Onion, Amaryllidaceae family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: Well-drained, fertile soil. Can be planted from seeds, sets, and transplants. Onion bulbing is triggered by day length. Short Day varieties form bulbs when day length reaches 10 hours.

  • OREGANO

    OREGANO: General information- Origanum vulgare, Oregano, Lamiaceae family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: light, moderately fertile, well-drained soil. Can thrive in areas with tough growing conditions. Grows well in a container. Perennial

  • PARSLEY

    PARSLEY: General information- Petroselinum crispum, Parsley, Apiaceae family, Sunlight: Full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained soil, high in organic matter. Grows well in a container. Biennial

  • PASTE TOMATOES

    PASTE TOMATOES: General information- Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato, Solanaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Tomatoes come in both determinate (bush) varieties and indeterminate (climbing) varieties.

  • PEAS

    PEAS: General information- Pisum sativum (Peas) Fabaceae Family (Legume) Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: fertile, well drained soil. Can tolerate light frost. Bush and vining varieties.

  • PEPPERS

    PEPPERS: General information- Capsicum annuum, Pepper, Solanaceae family, Sunlight: Full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained fertile soil. Bell (pictured here), sweet, and hot varieties.

  • POTATOES

    POTATOES: General information- Solanum tuberosum, Potato, Solanaceae family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: prefers well-drained, light, deep, loose soil, high in organic matter.

  • RADISH

    RADISH: General information- Raphanus sativus (Radish) Brassicaceae family, Sunlight: full sun to part shade. Soil Conditions: requires well-drained soil. Needs consistent moisture. Grows well in container.

  • RADISHES

    Radishes: 

    • cientific Name: Raphanus sativus
      • Family: Brassica
    • Cool season
    • Planting Window:
      • Spring: mid-March to mid-April
      • Fall: mid-August to mid-September
  • ROSEMARY

    ROSEMARY: General information- Salvia rosmarinus, Rosemary, Lamiaceae family. Sunlight: full sun.Soil conditions: loose, well-drained soil. Grows well in a container. Perennial

  • SAGE

    SAGE: General information- Salvia offiinalis, Sage, Lamiaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: sandy, loamy, well-drained soil. Grows well in a container. Perennial

  • SLICER TOMATOES

    SLICER TOMATOES: General information- Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato Solanaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Tomatoes come in both determinate (bush) varieties and indeterminate (climbing) varieties.

  • SUMMER SQUASH

    Summer Squash: General information- Cucurbita pepo, Summer Squash, Cucurbitaceae family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil Conditions: requires well-drained soil, high fertility. Grows well in container.

  • SWEET POTATOES

    SWEET POTATOES: General information- pomoea batatas, Sweet Potato, Convolvulaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well-drained, loose soil. Grown from slips.

  • SWISS CHARD

    SWISS CHARD: General Information- Swiss Chard: Beta vulgaris var. cicla (Chenopodiaceae) Sunlight: full Sun to part shade. Soil conditions: requires well-drained soil. Prefers deep, loose, fertile soil, high in organic matter. Harvest outer leaves, avoiding center crown, for continued production.

  • THYME

    THYME: General information- Thymus vulgaris, Thyme, Lamiaceae family Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: light, well-drained soil. Grows well in a container. Perennial

  • TOMATO FACTS AND RECIPES

    Skin should appear deep, bright red (except heirloom tomatoes have different colors), without blemishes or bruises or discoloration. Feel: dense, firm, but not too hard; and without any soft spots. Smell: should have a strong, sweet, earthy odor by the stem.

  • TOMATOES

    Tomatoes: 

    • Scientific Name: Lycopersicon lycopersicum
      • Family: Solanaceae
    • Warm season
    • Planting Window:
      • Start seeds indoors, under lights in mid-March 8 weeks prior to transplanting around mid-May
  • TURNIPS

    TURNIPS: General information- Brassica rapa, Turnip, Brasssicaceae family (Mustards) Sunlight: full sun. Can tolerate some shade. Soil Conditions: loose, fertile soil with good drainage. Roots and leaves can be eaten.

  • VEGETABLE GARDENING BASICS

    Plan and put your garden on paper first and record any planting changes. If this is not the first time gardening in this spot, use last year’s garden plan as a guide to place this year’s crops.

  • WATERMELON

    WATERMELON: General information- Citrullus lanatus, Watermelon, Cucurbitaceae family. Sunlight: full sun. Soil conditions: well drained, fertile soil. Heat loving, vining plant.

  • WINTER SQUASH

    WINTER SQUASH: General information - Cucurbita maxima, Winter Squash, Cucurbitaceae Family, Sunlight: full sun. Soil Conditions: requires well-drained soil, high fertility.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • >>

 

 

DEUFFC_extension_website - 1

 

The Delaware Urban Farm and Food Coalition (DEUFFC) provides a network of support for community-oriented urban agriculture and community garden projects that seek to expand access to healthy foods in Northern Delaware.

LEARN MORE >


Additional Resources

Demonstration gardens can be found at Extension offices throughout the state!
Community gardens grow community! These gardens are places where residents get together and build relationships with each other. They are also places where families, classmates, and neighbors share knowledge and learn from one another. Gardens serve as a space to grow food, play, and relax.
These suggested varieties have been selected for their productiveness, quality, flavor, and disease resistance. The characteristics of a single cultivar may vary somewhat depending on soil type, planting date, weather conditions and gardening techniques.
This publication provides an outline of food safety practices important to consider in the edible home garden.

School and community garden resources

So You Want to Have a Community Garden?  
 

Planning… the hard part
 

  • Why? For fresh food, to bring the neighborhood together, exercise, education, safe activity, for individuals and families.
  • Who? Will lead the effort, do the work, all year, even when it is hot and dry, or rainy.
  • Where? Community space, safe soil, sun at least six hours a day, fencing, easy access.
  • Soil: What was there before? Have it tested, be ready to add compost, minerals, or fertilizer.  Decide on raised beds or in-ground.
  • Water: Where will you get it and will you have to pay?
  • Consider tools, storage, donations or grant funds to purchase the tools, water, seeds, plants and other items for your garden.



Planting, Growing, and Harvesting… the fun part!
 

Choose easy to grow vegetables and flowers to start with.  

  • Early planting (April- May) might include lettuce, spinach, arugula, radishes, beets, peas, collards, and chard from seeds.
  • Warm weather planting (May-July) might include beans, cucumbers, and herbs, and tomato and pepper transplants.
  • Fall planting (August to September) might include lettuce and kale.
    • Add flowers like alyssum, nasturtium, marigolds, and sunflowers to attract bees, birds, and helpful insects. Plus they look and smell nice!
    • Be sure to water, slow and deep, unless there has been at least 1”of rain/week.
    • Check your plants daily for pests, insects or disease.
    • Harvest, share, eat, enjoy!

A New Approach to Companion Planting:
Adding Diversity to your Community Garden

 

Why add diversity?
 

  • Flowering plants attract and support natural enemies for pest control, and pollinators, like bees and butterflies. 
  • Aromatic or bushy plants can prevent pests from finding their host plants, and may produce toxins that repel pests.
  • Native grasses can increase populations of ground-dwelling generalist predators, such as ground beetles and spiders.

 

How to add diversity
 

  • Combine crop plants with other plants in the vegetable bed.
  • Plant flowering native perennials that attract and support beneficial insects and that bloom at different times.
  • Plant flowering shrubs and trees for more flower resources plus berries and habitat for birds. 

      

Resources
 

Steps to Planting a Container Salad Garden:  “Lettuce” begin!

 

  • Container: Must have holes for drainage; get creative and plant in containers of various shapes, sizes, and materials.
  • Soil: Purchase a high-quality potting soil and fill your container to the brim.  Do not compact!  The potting soil will settle once the container is planted.
  • Water: Keep soil moist but not WET! Rule of thumb is to water when soil is dry 1” down. Water at the base of the plants, slowly and deeply until you see water drain from the container.  
  • Fertilize: It can help but it is not necessary if you purchase a quality, nutrient-rich potting soil.
  • Plan your container garden: Greens like lettuce, spinach, and Swiss chard prefer cool weather so we plant in spring and/or fall.  Understand how your plants will grow- plant taller plants in the center of the container, and smaller plants on the edge of the container.  Consider planting edible flowers.  They look nice and can be eaten too!  Cool season flowers include nasturtium and pansies.  

 

Additional helpful tips!
 

  • Do not plant until danger from frost has passed.
  • At planting, moisten the soil but do not soak!
  • If planting seeds read the directions on the packet to plant properly, and then watch for germination (typically 7-14 days).  Keep moistened but not wet.  After the seeds have germinated, don’t be afraid to “thin” your tiny plants as needed to make room for their growth!
  • If planting transplants, space according to mature size and height (refer to the label that accompanied the plant when you purchased it).  Transplants have developed root systems that sometimes need to be loosened, so gently tease the roots before planting.  Be sure to water after planting, and when dry.
  • Harvest your salad greens as needed and enjoy!

Community gardens grow community! These gardens are places where residents get together and build relationships with each other.

Download the toolkit (PDF) >


School and Community Garden Bulletins

Does your school have a garden or is your school thinking of adding one? The Delaware Master Gardeners are starting a Community Garden News bulletin. Register online to receive this email directly to your inbox! For more info on starting a garden at your school, please contact Carrie Murphy at cjmurphy@udel.edu.


Lawn and Garden


All Results

Clear All Filters

Sorry, no results found.

  • BUYING AND INSTALLING CERTIFIED SOD

    Like a house built on sand, your beautiful sod can be destroyed in hours by improper care at the outset. Its roots have been severed in the harvesting process and this makes it totally dependent on your tender, loving care for at least the first three weeks of its new life.

  • CHOOSING LAWN AND LANDSCAPE CARE COMPANIES

    Many homeowners no longer perform the work themselves when it comes to applying fertilizer and pesticides to their lawns and landscape beds. Lawn and/or landscape companies willing to supply that service are numerous. 

  • CLEMATIS VARIETIES PRUNING GUIDE

    Early Flowering: Blooms early in spring from last season’s buds (old wood). Only prune after flowering and remove dying vines. Mid-Season Flowering: Blooms in late spring and early summer before growth begins. Flowers from the side shoot off the previous year’s growth. Pruning must be done in early spring before new growth is visible.

  • COMBATING SOIL COMPACTION

    Soil texture refers to the size of soil particles, with clayey soils having the smallest particles, sandy the largest, and silty, medium. Loamy soils posses a relatively even concentration of the three particle sizes.

  • DEALING WITH DROUGHT IN THE LANDSCAPE

    It is less expensive economically and environmentally to maintain landscape plants during a drought with minimal watering than to allow landscape plants to die and lose the benefits they provide. 

  • DELAWARE GARDENER’S GUIDE TO LAWN AND LANDSCAPE FERTILIZERS

     Fertilizers contain one or more essential plant nutrients and can be applied to landscapes to improve plant growth and quality or to correct a nutrient deficiency. There are many fertilizers available to consumers at local lawn and garden centers. 

  • DELAWARE GARDENER’S GUIDE TO SOIL PH

    Soil pH is a measure of soil acidity or alkalinity. On the pH scale a value of 7 is neutral, pH values less than 7 are acidic, and pH values greater than 7 are alkaline. Homeowners and gardeners are interested in soil pH because soil pH directly affects the growth and quality of many landscape plants.

  • DELAWARE GARDENING: CHALLENGE TO NEWCOMERS

    Gardening in Delaware can be challenging. While the state of Delaware is small, it is comprised of two different growing environments—the piedmont and coastal plane. The piedmont covers about 5% of the land area of Delaware and exists on only the northern most corner of the state.

  • DELAWARE LIVABLE LAWNS

    The goal of the Delaware Livable Lawns initiative is simple - reduce fertilizer and pesticide runoff from lawns. Did you know that the EPA considers stormwater runoff from yards, streets, parking lots and other areas to be one of the most significant sources of contamination in our country’s waters?

  • DESIGNING A SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE TO SERVE YOUR NEEDS

    Many traditional home landscapes feature vast areas of under-utilized space, such as large turf grass lawns. Sustainable sites feature spaces for human enjoyment, considering opportunities to design outdoor rooms that suit specific needs as well as promote the health of the environment.

  • DOLLAR SPOT OF TURFGRASS

    Dollar spot is an economically important disease of both cool-season and warm-season turfgrass. Due to the persistent nature of this disease, more money is spent on managing dollar spot than any other turfgrass diseases. Dollar spot reduces the aesthetic and playing quality of turfgrass.

     

  • FERTILIZER BASICS

    Proper fertilization will enhance plant growth without polluting the environment. However, misuse of fertilizer can harm the environment and injure landscape plants by causing fertilizer burn to leaves and/or roots.

  • GREEN ROOFS

    A green roof is a specially-engineered rooftop that supports plant life. Green roofs have been utilized in Europe for 30 years and are quickly gaining popularity in the United States.

  • GROUNDCOVER ALTERNATIVES TO TURF GRASS

    Plants that spread over time to cover the ground are referred to as groundcovers. Usually this term denotes low-growing plants, but groundcovers can also refer to taller, spreading shrubs or trees that grow together to create a dense cover of vegetation.

  • HOW DOES YOUR LAWN AND LANDSCAPE CARE IMPACT WATER QUALITY

    All living plants return some of this water back into the atmosphere through transpiration. Some groundwater also returns to the surface by flowing down grade to fill a pond, supply a stream or just bubble as a spring. Certain soils allow groundwater to infiltrate deeper into the soil and fill aquifers and deep wells. 

  • LAWN MANAGEMENT FOR WATER CONSERVATION

    When designing a landscape, consider alternatives to turf. Use attractive, low-maintenance ground covers, tree and shrub plantings and water-permeable paving. A major benefit of turf is that it will take traffic. Take advantage of that and install turf where it will be used as a play area.

  • LIVABLE LAWNS - MANAGING A HEALTHY LAWN

    The benefits of a healthy, attractive lawn are many and diverse. Lawns prevent erosion, provide cooling, re­duce dust and mud, remove pollut­ants from the environment, absorb CO2 and produce 02 Lawns provide a safe, comfortable surface for many athletic and social activities. Ar­eas of lawn, whether large or small, help bring green to the urban envi­ronment.

  • LIVABLE PLANTS FOR THE HOME LANDSCAPE

    This brochure provides plant suggestions that can help gardeners create diverse landscape plantings with native and non-invasive exotic plants. 

  • LIVEABLE ECOSYTEMS: A MODEL FOR SUBURBIA

    What is a suburban livable ecosystem? It’s a landscape that takes advantage of natural processes while providing tangible benefits to its owner. 

  • NATIVE PLANTS FOR DELAWARE LANDSCAPES

    Native plants are indigenous to a particular region and provide an essential foundation to support wildlife habitats for native insects and birds. Well-adapted to the local habitat, native plants grow using less water and fewer pesticide applications growing with minimum maintenance. 

  • PLANTS FOR A LIVABLE DELAWARE

    This series of brochures were developed to educate Delawareans about the problem of invasive plants in the landscape.  

  • PREVENTING EROSION

    A crucial role of sustainable sites is to reduce erosion, the physical wear of soil and surface rocks by water and wind. Eroded soil, called sediment, is the number one pollutant of our waterways.

  • PRUNING EVERGREENS

    Pruning is an important maintenance practice. Although necessary, pruning can be kept to a minimum by the wise use and proper placement of plant materials in the landscape. Evergreen plants can be divided into two broad categories: (1) Narrowleaf (needled) evergreens such as pines, junipers, yews, and (2) Broadleaf evergreens like rhododendrons, hollies, boxwood.

  • PRUNING WOODY PLANTS

    Good pruning is necessary to preserve the general attractiveness of your landscape and to keep your ornamental plants healthy. Although forest trees grow quite well with only nature’s pruning, landscape trees require a higher level of care to maintain their safety and aesthetics.

  • RECYCLING LEAVES

    What organic material is full of nutrients, essential for the natural processes of soil rejuvenation, and arrives absolutely free of cost to millions of homeowners every autumn? You guessed it— the colorful liberated leaves of deciduous trees. Recycling leaves offers a great alternative to the environmental and economic expense of removing this resource from your property.

  • SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPE MATERIALS AND PRACTICES

    A sustainable site incorporates renewable, local, and low-energy input landscape materials and avoids materials, products, and practices that are harmful to the environment.

  • TURFGRASS MADNESS: REASONS TO REDUCE THE LAWN IN YOUR LANDSCAPE

    Frequent and often costly maintenance is needed to keep turf grass looking its best. During peak growing months, a single lawn may require mowing more than once a week. During periods of drought, irrigation may be required to keep a lawn from going dormant. Yearly fertilizer is usually recommended for encouraging lush growth.

  • TURFGRASS SELECTIONS FOR DELAWARE

    Turfgrasses are divided into two categories based on their climate adaptation.  Cool-season grasses grow best in the spring and fall, with optimum growth when the temperature is between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.  Warm-season grasses grow best in the summer, with optimum growth at 80-90 degrees Fahrenheit. 

  • WEED CONTROL IN TURF

    Your lawn may grow more than the beautiful grass you intended.  It may also grow weeds, which prevent your lawn from looking its best. In addition to reducing the aesthetics of your lawn, weeds compete with the desired turfgrass for water, nutrients, and light.  If you don’t control weeds, your lawn will deteriorate over time.

  • YARD WASTE AND COMPOSTING

    Leave grass clippings on the lawn -If you mow frequently enough (one of the best ways to improve lawn health is to mow frequently), the clippings will just sift into the lawn. They also provide a great source of nitrogen as they decompose, reducing the fertilizer requirement for your lawn by one-third.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • >>

Food and Nutrition


All Results

Clear All Filters

Sorry, no results found.

  • 5 MISTAKES TO AVOID WHEN PREPARING YOUR HOLIDAY TURKEY

    Most of us buy our turkey frozen.  Because turkeys are frozen with the neck and giblets packaged inside the turkey, it is necessary to defrost it before cooking.  Three safe ways are available to defrost the bird.

  • AVOIDING TOO MUCH FAT, SATURATED FAT, AND CHOLESTEROL

    Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol does not mean "never eat cheese" because it contains fat or "never eat egg yolks" because they contain cholesterol. The total amount of fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol in your diet is what matters.

  • COLD SUMMER SOUPS

    Cold Roasted Tomato Soup- Serves: 8 Ingredients: 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, 3 pounds large ripe tomatoes, cut in half crosswise, remove stem area, 6 medium bell peppers, cut in half crosswise, ribs and seeds removed...

  • Canning Fruits

    Fruits, acidified tomatoes, pickled products, and fruit spreads may be processed safely in a boiling-water bath.

  • Canning Vegetables

    In the interest of food safety, vegetables must be processed in a pressure canner. Pressure for processing ranges between 5 pounds pressure to 15 pounds pressure, depending on the type of canner and food being processed. Processing time varies according to specific vegetable and size container.

  • DIETARY FIBER

    Dietary fiber is the part of plants that humans cannot digest. Although fiber was once thought to be a very simple constituent of food, it is now divided into two types – soluble and insoluble.

  • Freezing Fruits

    For the best in frozen fruits: Choose fruits of top quality to freeze. Wash fruit in cold running water. If submerged in cold water, lift carefully from water. Drain thoroughly in wire basket. Do not let fruit stand in water.

  • Freezing Vegetables

    How to freeze veggies: Choose vegetables of top quality to freeze. Frozen vegetables are no better than the initial product. Wash vegetables in cold running water. If submerged in cold water, lift carefully from water. Drain thoroughly in wire basket.

  • HERBS & SPICES – WHAT GOES WITH WHAT FOOD

    Choosing herbs and spices to go with foods. Bay leaf, cayenne, chili, curry, dill, ginger, mustard, paprika, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, thyme.

  • Hand Washing Procedures

    Use the double hand wash method to reduce disease-causing (pathogenic) organisms on hands. The steps include: Wet hands under hot, flowing water (100° F to 120° F, 2 gallons per minute). Apply sufficient soap to develop a good lather. (Refrain from using antibacterial soaps.)

  • KEEP FOOD SAFE – GUIDE TO REFRIGERATOR STORAGE PERIODS

    When storing foods in your refrigerator, use foil, plastic bags and wraps, or airtight containers. Clean refrigerators regularly to reduce food odors. Remove spoiled foods immediately so decay cannot pass to other foods.

  • KEEP FOOD SAFE – IT'S IN YOUR HANDS

    Foodborne illness can be the result of biological, chemical, or physical hazards.  Chemical hazards (for example, pesticides, food additives, or environmental contaminants, such as lead or mercury) often receive considerable public attention. 

  • Keep Food Safe for Seniors

    Foodborne Illness: Are You at Risk? When you experience diarrhea, vomiting, an upset stomach, fever or stomach cramps, you may think you have the flu.  But the real culprit may be harmful microorganisms called pathogens in the food you ate a few hours, a week, or even a month ago.

  • LET'S TALK TURKEY

    All poultry, including turkey, is highly perishable.  To ensure a safe product, proper handling and storage are important.  Buy poultry only from freezer, refrigerator or chill cases.  What are recommended ways of handling turkey?  Let’s consider some questions frequently asked about preparing, cooking and keeping turkeys.

  • NUTRITION: FATS

    Despite its bad reputation, some fat is needed in our diet.  Fats serve many functions in the body.  In addition to providing more than twice the energy supplied by carbohydrates and proteins and supplying essential fatty acids, fats serve as carriers for fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and as parts of cell membranes.

  • NUTRITION: WHAT IS CHOLESTEROL?

    Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance found in cells of humans and animals.  It can come from the foods we eat, but the body also makes cholesterol.  Although we often hear about ways to reduce blood cholesterol levels, cholesterol is one of many chemicals created and used by the body. 

  • OPEN KETTLE CANNING IS NO LONGER SAFE

    Since the late 1980’s we have been teaching that open kettle canning is no longer safe. Open kettle canning involves heating the food to boiling, pouring it into the jars, applying lids, and allowing the heat of the jar to cause the lid to seal. Many years ago, it was commonly used for pickles, jams and jellies, and sometimes used for tomatoes and applesauce.

  • REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER STORAGE CHART

    These short but safe time limits will help keep refrigerated food held at 40°F or below from spoiling or becoming dangerous. Purchase the product before “sell-by” or expiration dates...

  • SAFE BROWN BAG LUNCHES

    Use good sanitation and good personal hygiene when preparing food. Use special care with high protein, moist, and low-acid foods.

  • SPECIAL PROCEDURES FOR THE IMMUNE-COMPROMISED

    Foodborne illness is never pleasant, but it can be especially devastating for anyone with a weakened immune system. Special precautions should be taken to protect anyone who is susceptible to foodborne illness.

  • USING HERBS AND SPICES

    Although spices and herbs have been used since ancient times, they are playing a new and important role in modern food preparation.  They not only add unique flavors to our food, but contribute color and variety as well.  Certain spices and herbs used alone, or in blends, can replace or reduce salt and sugar in foods.

  • WHEN THE POWER IS OUT

    Bacteria that cause foodborne illness multiply rapidly on food kept at room temperature for more than 2 hours. Do not rely on the appearance or odor to determine if the food is safe. This guide tells you how long food stays cold when the power goes off to help you decide what to salvage and what to discard.

  • Washing Produce

    Eating a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables is healthy and adds color, texture and flavor to our diet.  Recent illnesses have been traced to eating raw fruits and vegetables containing harmful disease-causing microorganisms. 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • >>

 

Watch and learn

Interested in harvesting and preparing your own vegetables? Check out the videos and information below for gardening tips and recipes!

A link to the Vegetable Gardening youtube playlist.: youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=com.synechron.udel.models.functions.SubstrAfter

Vegetable Gardening

(Youtube playlist)

Information on vegetable gardening, accessible gardening, water management and more! 

A link to the Produce of the Week youtube playlist.: youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=com.synechron.udel.models.functions.SubstrAfter

Produce of the Week

(Youtube playlist)

Join us as we feature a local fruit/vegetable and share summer recipe ideas for you and your family!

A link to the Master Gardener Minute: youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=com.synechron.udel.models.functions.SubstrAfter

Master Gardener Minute

(Youtube playlist)

Our volunteer Master Gardener experts are excited to produce these short, yet informative videos that share best practices!