DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES


We have excellent teaching, research, and outreach programs in the areas of plant biology (cellular, genetics, genomics, microbial, molecular and physiology), agronomy (including pathology, soil management and weed science), horticulture (sustainable landscapes, fruits and vegetables), landscape architecture and environmental soil sciences (biogeochemistry, hydrology and plant-soil interactions). We have a distinguished faculty, known nationally and internationally for their research and outreach, and within UD for their excellence in teaching, advising and mentoring students.

Featured video

  • Trace Elements

    Article by Dante LaPenta | June 18, 2019

    Don Sparks honored as pioneer in environmental science at trace elements gathering

  • UD innovation goes to market

    Article by Karen Roberts | May 30, 2019

    UD-developed beneficial bacteria part of BASF product for soil

  • Honor for UD grad, now Auburn president

    Article by Dante LaPenta | April 23, 2019

    Auburn University president Steven Leath headlines George M. Worrilow and Distinguished Alumni Awards

  • Earth Day: Maggie Capooci

    Article by Joy Drohan, Eco-Write, LLC | April 22, 2019

    Delaware Environmental Institute Fellow a champion of tidal salt marshes

  • Robots on the farm

    Article by Julie Stewart | February 19, 2019

    Engineers and plant scientists team up to optimize corn growth

  • UD innovation goes to market

    Article by Karen Roberts | May 30, 2019

    UD-developed beneficial bacteria part of BASF product for soil

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Rodrigo Vargas headshot photo

Faculty Spotlight

Rodrigo Vargas Associate Professor

As temperatures rise, Earth's soil is 'breathing' more heavily. Dr. Vargas is part of a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science research study that suggests carbon stored in soil is entering atmosphere faster, all thanks to microbes.

Spotlights

Soybeans, sorghum and ... sand? Saltwater intrusion is turning some Eastern Shore farms into barren fields. Researchers are working to help farmers cope with test plots like this. (Photo submitted by Jarrod Miller)

Saltwater intrusion laying waste to Delmarva farms as sea level rises

Rising sea levels and climate change aren't just problems for the future - in some areas, they represent a real threat in the here and now. Jarrod Miller, Plant and Soil Sciences, explains how saltwater intrusion is threatening farms in low-lying areas of the Delmarva Peninsula.

Read the full article in Bay Journal.

 

Soybeans, sorghum and ... sand? Saltwater intrusion is turning some Eastern Shore farms into barren fields. Researchers are working to help farmers cope with test plots like this. (Photo submitted by Jarrod Miller)

UD's Lewandowski, Bruck team up with Laurel Redevelopment Corporation to revitalize town

In the town of Laurel in Western Sussex County, what started as combating water pollutants has become a full-scale downtown redevelopment project. Pulling off this waterfront redevelopment undertaking on Broad Creek required making better use of the waterway and moving the center of town. Professor and Director of Landscape Architecture Jules Bruck fleshed out her concept into what’s now known as 'The Ramble.'

Read the full article on UDaily

 

Soybeans, sorghum and ... sand? Saltwater intrusion is turning some Eastern Shore farms into barren fields. Researchers are working to help farmers cope with test plots like this. (Photo submitted by Jarrod Miller)

Erik Ervin in 'The Case Against Adnan Syed' finale

The New York Times published a detailed piece of the HBO true crime documentary "The Case Against Adnan Syed," which mentions the work of Erik Ervin. Our department chair examined a key piece of evidence in the case - how long the victim’s car had been abandoned on a patch of grass in a Baltimore lot.

Read the full article. Ervin's comments are highlighted in the section 'More Questions About the Car'.