Research and Innovation

Feed the world. Protect the planet.

Extraordinary challenges require extraordinary solutions. For 150 years, the daring innovations of our graduates have shaped the world we know today. Now, we carry on that daring spirit, using cutting-edge technology and scientific advances to envision a better tomorrow.

Focused on identifying and addressing future challenges, students and faculty of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources are mastering research in five areas of unique strength:

  • Climate change impacts, mitigation and adaptation;
  • Human dimensions of food, agriculture and natural resources;
  • Sustainable food systems, landscapes and ecosystems;
  • Genetics and genomics for plant, animal and ecosystem improvement; and
  • One Health intersections among animal, plant, human and ecosystem health.

Explore the exciting research we’re leading and the entrepreneurial ecosystem we’re building.

Robot captures imaging of root systems at UD Farm: youtube.com/watch?v=HKqOdS-i4BI

UD Research Initiatives

In an age of technology and innovation, the future has never looked more exciting.

Learn more

Upcoming events

Soil scientist Yan Jin awarded University’s highest faculty honor: youtube.com/watch?v=Rh__5gorAvo

Latest CANR Research News
  • Ag-inspired engineering

    December 08, 2021 | Written by Maddy Lauria
    Two UD professors from two different colleges have found common ground between corn and bridges that will allow them to better understand the structural stability upon which both objects rely.
  • Researchers with influence

    November 16, 2021 | Written by Tracey Bryant
    Three professors from the University of Delaware — Wendy Smith, Rodrigo Vargas and Yushan Yan — have been recognized as Highly Cited Researchers for 2021 by Clarivate, a global analytics company.
  • Looking deeper into the soil

    October 07, 2021 | Written by Dante LaPenta
    UD's Rodrigo Vargas is a co-principal investigator on a new $18.9 million National Science Foundation grant to study soil at depths greater than anywhere else in the world.
  • Inner Workings: Keeping arsenic out of rice

    August 12, 2021 | From the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Journal
    Angelia Seyfferth is investigating how husk fertilizer affects the movement and form of arsenic within the rice plant.

Faculty expert spotlights

Professor Michael takes a field sample.
Michael Crossley
Townsend Hall
302-831-3409

The agricultural entomologist studies insect movements, adaptions and response to environmental change.
Brandon McFadden speaks with a student holding a laptop
Brandon McFadden
Townsend Hall
302-831-1176

Professor McFadden studies food choice, perceptions of food and asymmetric information.

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