WELCOME TO ENTOMOLOGY AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY


Our department offers outstanding academic programs for undergraduate and graduate students preparing for research, teaching, and extension careers in entomology, ecology and wildlife conservation.

Our teaching, research, and extension efforts emphasize whole-organism biology, conservation biology, and the interactions between humans and other species.

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Why I majored in insect ecology and conservation: youtube.com/watch?v=A1Ofqrz8zH4

  • The Insect Zoo

    Article by Diane Stopyra | May 15, 2020

    Tarantulas and beetles and scorpions, oh my, the Entomology Club at UD has them all

  • Earth Day 2020

    Article by Beth Miller, Karen B. Roberts and Tracey Bryant | April 21, 2020

    On the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, UD scientists share their views of the planet's health

  • Soil judging team

    Article by Dante LaPenta | March 04, 2020

    First UD soil judging team earns professional development benefits

  • Driven To Discover: Ben Sammarco

    Article by Karen B. Roberts | August 20, 2019

    Undergrad looks for ways to improve honey bee disease resistance

  • Earth Day 2020

    Article by Beth Miller, Karen B. Roberts and Tracey Bryant | April 21, 2020

    On the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, UD scientists share their views of the planet's health

  • The Insect Zoo

    Article by Diane Stopyra | May 15, 2020

    Tarantulas and beetles and scorpions, oh my, the Entomology Club at UD has them all

Story Highlight

Our undergraduate programs

Our graduate programs

Photo of Greg Shriver

Faculty Spotlight

Greg Shriver Professor of Wildlife Ecology

Dr. Shriver studies avian ecology and conservation, ecological monitoring, restoration ecology and effects of sea-level rise on salt marsh birds.

Spotlights

UD Ph.D. candidate Imogene Cancellare in the Valley of the Cats in China

The animals in "Tiger King" were just background noise to human drama

Ph.D. candidate and wild cat conservationist Imogene Cancellare told Insider that "Tiger King" focused too much on the drama surrounding Joe Exotic and its other eccentric characters instead of the plight of big cats in their care.

Read the article.

An Asian giant hornet on display at the Washington state Department of Agriculture.

Why murder hornet is a terrible name 

Nature should certainly be respected, but not viewed negatively. Sensationalizing the threat of animals generally creates the wrong impression that nature is inherently harmful, or scary. "It's one of the most destructive messages that we can put out there," said Douglas Tallamy, a professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware.

Read the full article on Mashable