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NOTICE

Effective May 21, most capacity restrictions lifted; Delawareans should follow CDC mask guidance outdoors; larger events still require plan approval from DPH...

[Find out what this means for you]
  • All capacity restrictions inside restaurants, retail, other business establishments and houses of worship will be lifted.  Facilities will be able to use as much capacity as social distancing requirements will allow.

  • Masks will still be required indoors to prevent spread of COVID-19.

  • Outdoors, Delawareans should follow masking guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Risk for COVID-19 spread increases in large crowds that include unvaccinated people. In those cases, CDC recommends that everyone continue to wear a mask.  DPH may require masks for crowded venues and large gatherings including concerts, sporting events, etc.

  • Social distancing requirements will move from 6 feet to 3 feet.

  • Customers must continue to remain seated indoors and outdoors at bars and restaurants, unless a plan for dance floors and other areas is approved by DPH, and distancing of at least 3 feet should be maintained.

  • Events over 250 people indoors and outdoors will still require plan approval from DPH to ensure compliance with basic precautions to prevent spread of COVID-19.

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Vaccine Information

Getting the vaccine is one of the many steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, COVID-19 can cause severe illness or death.

Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight off the virus if you are exposed. After you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you may be able to start doing some things that you stopped doing because of the pandemic. You should keep taking precautions in public places or when you are with unvaccinated people from more than one household.

Getting vaccinated and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19. For additional information, visit the official CDC vaccine webpage.

The State of Delaware is now
vaccinating persons 12+

 

Vaccine eligibility in Delaware

Vaccine eligibility in Delaware: youtube.com/watch?v=U1XImSrIa9I

Where to get vaccinated in DE

Where to get vaccinated in Delaware: youtube.com/watch?v=HCoaT_2wPWc

Make a vaccination appointment

How to make a vaccination appointment in Delaware: youtube.com/watch?v=s3c3AyFwJpE

 

How the vaccines work

The COVID-19 vaccines allow us to develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different vaccines work in different ways, however like all vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory cells” that will remember how to fight the infection in the future.

It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to produce these “memory cells”. Therefore, it is possible to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccination did not have enough time to provide protection

After vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. This is completely normal and is a sign that the body is building immunity to the virus.

mRNA Vaccines

mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of this harmless protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies recognize that this protein is not supposed to be there, and build “memory cells” that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.
 

Watch: How MRNA vaccines work (YouTube)

Vector Vaccines

Vector vaccines contain a modified version of a different virus than the one that causes COVID-19. Inside the shell of the modified virus, is material from the virus that causes COVID-19. This is called “viral vector”. Once the viral vector is inside of our cells, the cells receive instructions to make a protein that is unique to the virus that causes COVID-19. Our cells then make copies of that protein. This prompts our bodies to make “memory cells” that will remember how to fight that virus if we are infected in the future.

 

Watch: How Vaccines Are Made and Manufactured (Youtube)

Comparing available vaccines

 

 

Moderna

 

 

Pfizer

 

 

Johnson & Johnson

 

Type of vaccine

mRNA

mRNA

viral vector

Number of shots

2 shots,
28 days apart

2 shots,
21 days apart

1

How given

shot in the muscle
of the upper arm

shot in the muscle
of the upper arm

shot in the muscle
of the upper arm

Age limit

18+

12+

18+

Common side effects
  • pain, redness, or swelling in the arm where you got the shot, tiredness, muscle pain, headache, chills, fever, nausea.

  • Side effects usually start within a day or two of getting the vaccine. They may affect your ability to do daily activities, but should go away in a day or two.

  • pain, redness, or swelling in the arm where you got the shot, tiredness, muscle pain, headache, chills, fever, nausea.

  • pain, redness, or swelling in the arm where you got the shot, tiredness, muscle pain, headache, chills, fever, nausea.

How well it works
  • Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Moderna vaccine was 94.1% effective at preventing COVID-19 in people who received both doses who had no evidence of being previously infected.

  • The vaccine appeared to have high efficacy in clinical trials among people of diverse age, sex, race, and ethnicity categories and among persons with underlying medical conditions.

  • 100% effective in preventing death, hospitalization, and severe disease.

  • Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Pfizer vaccine was 95% effective at preventing COVID-19 in people without evidence of previous infection. 

  • 100% effective in preventing death and hospitalization. 

  • 99% effective in preventing severe illness.

  • 66.3% effective in clinical trials at preventing confirmed COVID-19 illness in people who had no evidence of prior infection 2 weeks after receiving the vaccine.

  • 100% effective in preventing death and hospitalization.

  • 85% effective in preventing severe disease.

  • Early evidence suggests J&J vaccine might provide protection against asymptomatic infection, which is when a person is infected by COVID-19 but does not get sick.

How long until you're protected
  • Some protection 10 to 14 days after the first dose.

  • Full protection two weeks after the second dose.

  • Some protection 10 to 14 days after first dose.

  • Full protection one week after the second dose.

  • Some protection 14 days after the vaccine.

  • Full protection in 28 days.

 

Safety

  • The vaccine will protect you from becoming infected with the virus, and from getting severely ill if you are diagnosed with COVID-19.  
  • The vaccine is both SAFE and EFFECTIVE!

  • Through rigorous evaluations, the vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) are 94% effective and safe across a wide diversity of racial and ethnic groups.

  • Even though the vaccine was developed quickly, no corners were cut.

  • The vaccine was strictly monitored by the FDA, and more people than is standard volunteered for trials to speed up the testing process.

  • The CDC still monitors the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine through the use of technology.

  • You can get the vaccine with confidence!

 

Learn more about vaccine safety >

 

Pfizer vaccine now approved by the FDA for ages 12-15 as well as 16+ Delaware is currently working on informational materials and preparing to make the vaccine available to this newest group of vaccine –eligible people.

 

Where can our 12-15 year olds get their Pfizer vaccinations?*

  • Pediatricians

  • Pharmacies

  • Nemours & ChristianaCare hospital systems

  • DPH public health clinics and new vaccination clinics

  • Curative sites

  • *Written parental consent is required to vaccinate individuals younger than 18 years old, however the parent is not required to be on site with the child during the vaccination. ID for the minor child is not required.

     

Is it safe for my child to get the vaccine?

  • COVID-19 is a vaccine-preventable disease, just like measles, mumps and other childhood diseases. The vaccine is their best protection against it. 

  • According to Pfizer, clinical trials involving 2,260 12-to-16-year-olds showed its efficacy is 100%.

  • No cases of coronavirus were found among children aged 12 to 15 who received the vaccine, while 16 cases were identified in the placebo group.

  • The children produced strong antibody responses; much higher levels compared to trial participants 16 – 25 years old according to trial data from Pfizer.

 

Why should I get my child vaccinated?

  • Children are not immune from COVID-19. 1.5 million cases, and more than 13,000 hospitalizations from the disease nationwide have been reported to the CDC among children ages 11-17. The vaccine is their best protection.

  • It’s particularly important to vaccinate children in this age group with underlying health conditions, or those who live with those who do. These individuals, including vulnerable seniors, are all at higher risk for severe illness, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19.

  • While youth are less likely to be hospitalized, 61% of those who were had at least one underlying health condition. 

  • As more people get vaccinated, adolescents represent an increasing proportion of recent COVID-19 cases. 

 

Learn more about vaccines and youth >

 

After the vaccine

Even after receiving the first and second dose of the vaccine, it is important to continue to protect yourself and others. While medical experts feel very confident that the COVID-19 vaccine can protect you from the virus and help get us all back to normal, it will take a large number of people getting the vaccine before our community can relax on following the golden rules that have helped protect Delawareans from getting coronavirus so far. 

 

You must continue to:

 

  • Follow outdoor masking guidance issued by the CDC. (effective May 21, 2021)
    • Risk for COVID-19 spread increases in large crowds that include unvaccinated people. In those cases, CDC recommends that everyone continue to wear a mask. 
    • DPH may require masks for crowded venues and large gatherings including concerts, sporting events, etc.
  • Practice social distancing of at least 3 feet. (Lowered from 6 feet effective May 21, 2021)

  • Wash or sanitize your hands frequently, especially after touching surfaces frequently contacted by others.

  • Stay at home if you feel sick, experience symptoms, or think you have been exposed to COVID-19.



Prevention and treatment


Mental and emotional well-being


At-home learning and recreation for youth


Food and food safety

 


Financial and medical resources


Farm and business resources


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Our commitment continues in spite of COVID-19
 

Since 1869, UD Cooperative Extension has brought university knowledge and resources to the people of Delaware — and despite the upset of COVID-19 to our daily lives, this commitment continues. We are, however, adjusting our delivery of programs and services in order to protect the health and safety of our families, friends and community.

 

In accordance with Governor Carney’s guidance, here’s how we are restricted:
 

  • Extension office spaces have closed in all three counties.

  • In-person programs and events have been either canceled, postponed or moved online.

  • Extension agents are limiting in-person contact.

  • All soil samples must now be mailed in for testing.

 

This is how we are adjusting to continue to deliver the quality Extension information you need:


  • Offering COVID-19 resources for you
    Our COVID-19 Resources webpage offers a collection of over 50 resources for you, your family and your business. Topics range from creating your own hand sanitizer and how to properly sanitize your home, to ideas for keeping the kids learning outside of school and managing your business from home.

  • Moving educational programming online
    Whenever possible, Extension programming is being moved online. A full list of upcoming programs and their current status is available on our Extension calendar and is being continually updated. Past programs are now available for streaming on our Extension Online Courses webpage.

  • Continuing plant/insect testing
    If you have plant or insect diagnostic samples please contact the agent covering agriculture or horticulture for your county, listed on this webpage.

  • Soil test submission procedures have changed
    For up to date soil testing information, including how to purchase kits and submit soil samples please visit the Soil Testing Laboratory’s website.

  • Consulting by phone and online
    View the UD Extension staff directory for the contact information of individual educators and staff members who can answer your questions or direct you to the information you need. If they are not currently available by phone, please leave a message and we will be in touch. As agents are able, they will conduct visits on an as-needed basis.


Rain or shine, UD Cooperative Extension is here to serve you!