Feeding the world. Protecting the planet.

On January 12, 1869, the Board of Trustees of the University of Delaware signed an agreement to become a land-grant college. This designation initiated a legacy of agricultural and ecological research. For 150 years, our faculty have conducted groundbreaking research that shaped the past (and future) of our food and our planet. Cooperative Extension brought these cutting-edge discoveries to the public — putting knowledge into practice. And our alumni became successful growers, agribusiness leaders, groundbreaking scientists, policy makers and world changers.

With record numbers in student enrollment, interest in studying agriculture and natural resources is high as we teach and prepare the next generation of students for careers that matter and opportunities to make a difference in the world.

College graduates with expertise in food, agriculture, renewable natural resources and the environment are essential to our ability to address the U.S. priorities of food security, sustainable energy and environmental quality.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

College graduates with expertise in food, agriculture, renewable natural resources and the environment are essential to our ability to address the U.S. priorities of food security, sustainable energy and environmental quality.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

Recent news

  • Malt barley in Delaware

    Article by Michele Walfred | November 08, 2019

    UD’s research on malt barley a conduit for industry and farmers

  • Military vets

    Article by Dante LaPenta | November 07, 2019

    Blue Hen alumni serve the country in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps

  • Decoding plant communication

    Article by Karen B. Roberts | October 25, 2019

    UD-led project aims to unlock how plant and pathogens communicate

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 Featured videos

How will removing milldams impact water quality?

All over the eastern part of the United States, thousands of small dams span streams and rivers, harkening back to colonial times. Now, many of these inactive dams are being removed. However, less attention is being paid to how removing the dams could impact water quality, which is precisely what Professor Shreeram Inamdar is investigating.

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