Alisha Rovner

Alisha Rovner

Alisha Rovner

Assistant Professor
 302-831-3332

Office Location:
315 McDowell Hall

Dr. Alisha Rovner is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition at the University of Delaware.  She earned her B.A. in Psychology from Rutgers University and began her career as a research coordinator in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  Dr. Rovner then went on to complete her Ph.D. in Human Nutrition from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  After completing her Ph.D., Dr. Rovner subsequently spent three years as a post-doctoral fellow at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.   Her research interests include vitamin D, bone health and body composition in children with chronic diseases.

 

Courses

  • NTDT200 Nutrition Concepts
  • NTDT390 Research Methods in Nutrition
  • NTDT401 Micronutrient
  • NTDT810 Nutrition Informatics

 

Tuddenham S, Ghanem KG, Caulfield LE, Rovner AJ, Robinson C, Shivakoti R, Miller R, Burke A, Murphy C, Ravel J, Brotman RM. Associations between dietary micronutrient intake and molecular-Bacterial Vaginosis. Reprod Health. 2019 Oct 22;16(1).

Rovner AJ, Stallings VA, Rutstein R, Schall JI, Zemel BS. Effect of high dose cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) on bone and body composition in children and young adults with HIV infection: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial Osteoporos Int. 2017 Jan;28(1):201-209.

Rovner AJ, Nansel TR, Mehta SN, Higgins LA, Haynie DL, Laffel LM. Development and Validation of the Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition Knowledge Survey 2012. Diabetes Care, Aug;35(8):1643-7.

Rovner A, Stallings V, Kawchak D, Schall J, Ohene-Frempong K, Zemel B. Children with Sickle Cell Disease are at High Risk of Vitamin D Deficiency. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2008;108(9):1512-6.

Rovner A, O’Brien K. Hypovitaminosis D in Healthy Children: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2008;162(6):513-9.

Rovner A, Stallings V, Schall J, Zemel B. Vitamin D insufficiency in children, adolescents and young adults with Cystic Fibrosis despite routine oral supplementation. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007;86(6):1694-1699.