Facilities & Resources

Delaware Sea Grant’s Danielle Swallow (left) and William Boyden, chief of the Fenwick Island Police Department, present to participants about the importance of emergency planning.
Delaware Sea Grant’s Danielle Swallow (left) and William Boyden, chief of the Fenwick Island Police Department, present to participants about the importance of emergency planning.
Robotic Discovery Laboratories faculty with various air, sea and land robotic equipment.

The College of Earth, Ocean and Environment has several facilities and resources on the main campus in Newark, Del. and at the Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes, Del. offering students, faculty and staff access to high-tech instruments for supporting studies and research.


 

Two people working outside the large wave tank

Air-Sea-Current Flume

The tank overall length is 42 m with a working section 37 m long. It is 1m wide and 1.2 m high. Water depth is generally kept at 0.75 m to allow sufficient air space above the surface. The tank is equipped with a programmable wave maker, and a wind tunnel capable of up to 17m/s wind speed.. Air temperature and water temperature are also independently controllable and can be set from 5 to 40 degrees Celsius. Currents in the tank can be generated using a recirculating pump or by tilting the tank (up to 1.1 degrees). An artificial beach is placed at the end of the tank to dissipate wave energy and eliminate wave reflection. Read more >

Air-Sea Interaction Laboratory

Cape Henlopen State Park
15099 Cape Henlopen Drive
Lewes, DE 19958
302-831-6658
airsealab@udel.edu
www1.udel.edu/ASI-Lab/facilities/index.html

Lab manager: Fabrice Veron


 
Weather station in a field

Delaware Environmental Observing System

DEOS provides real-time environmental conditions for Delaware and the surrounding region. DEOS operates and maintains over 80 environmental monitoring platforms and brings in data from over 200 additional environmental monitoring platforms throughout our region. Read more >

Delaware Environmental Observing System

102 Pearson Hall
Newark, DE 19716-2541
Phone: (302) 831-6906
Fax: (302) 831-6654
Email: cema-info@udel.edu
www.deos.udel.edu

Director: Kevin Brinson

 

Real- Time Environmental Monitoring Locations:

  • Throughout the State of Delaware
  • Chester County, PA
  • Fair Hill and North East, MD (Cecil County)

 
Lab equipment

Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Lab

The Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Laboratory (EIGL) is a facility for stable isotope-ratio measurements and environmental radioactivity that is housed in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Delaware (UD).  It is directed by Prof. Neil Sturchio and staffed by a full-time Laboratory Manager. 

EIGL equipment:

Conflo-IV reference interface; Trace GC 1310 having PTV injector; ISQ II LT GC/qMS; GC Isolink II combustion/thermal conversion preparation device; TriPlus autosampler.

 

 

With dual-inlet and multiple continuous-flow inlet systems [Carlo-Erba NCS-2500 elemental analyzer; Gas Bench® automated gas handling system; Conflo-III gas chromatograph-combustion interface with HP 6890 gas chromatograph; LEAP CombiPal autosampler; and custom-built system for continuous-flow purification and stable isotopic analysis of Cl as CH3Cl.

A Canberra reverse-electrode intrinsic Ge detector system (34% relative efficiency at 1.33 MeV); an ORTEC model GEM-115220-P-S detector (122% relative efficiency at 1.33 MeV; and two new ORTEC well-geometry Ge detector systems (15-mm well diameter, 25% relative efficiency at 1.33 MeV). All gamma detectors are housed in low-background 10-cm lead shields; have ORTEC DSPEC series digital signal analyzers interfaced with the Maestro-2000 multichannel analyzer software package for data acquisition.

(~1 background count per day per alpha peak from 3 to 8 MeV) interfaced via Ethernet link with a PC for acquisition and analysis of alpha spectrometry data.

Equipped with multiple fume hoods, furnaces, ovens, balances, centrifuges, various glass and Teflon labware, ultrapure deionized water systems, and vacuum manifolds for sample preparation.

Stable Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectrometry Laboratory

251 Patrick Harker Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory (Harker ISE Lab)
221 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

 

Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory

007 Penny Hall
255 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716


 
instructor at front of classroom with students looking at computers with GIS software displayed

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Labs

New upgrades to computer rooms in both Pearson Hall in Newark and Cannon Lab in Lewes allow for GIS teaching and research with the most up-to-date machines and software. The two rooms are connected by the college’s ITV system, allowing classes to reach students on both campuses simultaneously.

Newark Location:

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Lab

Pearson Hall
125 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

 

Lewes Location:

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Lab

Harry L. Cannon Laboratory
1044 College Drive
Lewes, DE 19958


 

Visitors on campus looking at the video wall in the Global Visualization Lab.

Global Visualization Lab

Researchers use the video wall in the Global Visualization Lab to display and interpret data gathered from satellites, surface monitors and underwater robots to study ocean phenomena. The lab allows the various data collection technologies to not just work in parallel but integrate findings for a more complete picture across larger scales.

Global Visualization Lab

105 Otis H. Smith Laboratory
College Drive
Lewes, DE 19958

Lab manager: Matt Oliver


 

 Lewes classroom interacting with students in Newark by way of ITV.

ITV Classrooms

CEOE's Interactive Television (ITV) system enables participants at both ends to see and hear each other in real time. By bridging the distance between our campuses in Newark and Lewes, ITV allows students to maximize their educational experience by being able to attend class and participate in symposiums on both campuses without commuting. Classrooms are equipped with Smartboards and computer screen share features to make the virtual classroom experience even more dynamic.


 
MakerGym 3D printers

MakerSpaces

Both CEOE and UD offer multiple MakerSpaces to encourage innovation and hands-on invention. The Robotic Discovery Laboratories (see entry below) include a workshop with tools for fabricating and modifying autonomous systems and other cutting-edge technology. Together with other spaces in the UD MakerNetwork, the Visualization and Advanced Simulation Training (VAST) Lab, the Geotechnology Education Lab (GEL), and the university’s newly opened MakerGym provide maker resources to students on main campus. Read more >

Newark Locations:

UD MakerGym

Pearson Hall
125 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

Faculty lead: Art Trembanis

 

VAST Lab

Penny Hall (basement)
255 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

Lab director: Art Trembanis

 

Geotechnology Education Lab

203A Penny Hall
255 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

Lab director: Michael O'Neal

 


Lewes Location:

Robotic Discovery Laboratories

161 Otis H. Smith Laboratory
College Drive
Lewes, DE 19958
https://www.udel.edu/research-innovation/maker/


 

Marine Operations Building and research vessels

Marine Operations

One of the things that sets CEOE apart is that it owns and operates a regional class research vessel in the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) fleet, used by universities, government and private industry. The R/V Hugh R. Sharp is based in Lewes but conducts research cruises all along the East Coast and can spend weeks at a time at sea. The college has several smaller vessels as well, ideal for local research and educational use. Read more >

Adrian S. Hooper Marine Operations Building

700 Pilottown Road
Lewes, DE 19958

More information on Marine Operations >

Director of Marine Operations: Jon Swallow


 

 

Student reading a book in the Marine Studies Library

Marine Studies Library

The Marine Studies Library provides a specialized collection of 19,000 volumes on marine biology, oceanography, geology, and related topics. Seating is available for approximately 50 users including public computers for access to the Internet and the library’s electronic resources. A self-service scanner is available from which scans can be emailed or saved to a USB flash drive. Group study areas are also provided. Read more >

Marine Studies Library

234 Harry L. Cannon Laboratory
1044 College Drive
Lewes, DE 19958
Email: lib-mars@udel.edu

https://library.udel.edu/branchlibraries/marine-studies/

Google Map


 
Student and professor in the Meteorology Visualization Lab

Meteorology Visualization Lab

With half a dozen monitors displaying feeds from satellites, radar, real-time monitoring stations on the ground, and other sources, the Meteorology Visualization Lab provides a convenient and impactful space for teaching, forecasting and conducting research. The lab is adjacent to the Office of the Delaware State Climatologist, a faculty member in the Department of Geography and Spatial Sciences.

Meteorology Visualization Lab

Pearson Hall
125 Academy Street
Newark, DE 19716

Lab director: Dan Leathers


 

Faculty with various air, sea and land robotic equipment

Robotic Discovery Laboratories

The Robotic Discovery Laboratories (RDL) combine the expertise of faculty members and research scientists who work in the area of underwater robotics, allowing them to discuss addressing problems with a variety of technologies and look for ways to integrate data across platforms. The laboratories house seven robots: six torpedoes and a block. The labs are outfitted with research space, work benches and storage areas

RDL equipment:

Number of Robots: 2

A semi-modular AUV, the REMUS 100 is equipped with side-scan sonar and can detect the difference between metal and organic matter at the seafloor.  An acoustic modem provides researchers with status and position updates while it is out on a mission, while a spectral radiometer helps researchers measure light levels in the vehicle’s location. Missions can run 6-12 hours over 40-60 kilometers at depths to 100 meters.

This modular AUV is used for deep research because it can carry larger sonar equipment deeper into the ocean than other AUV systems. Dual frequency down-looking sonar, built specifically for the UD vehicle and used for biological research, extends the range of the sonar to approximately 4,000 feet! Missions run 6-50 hours over 40-300 kilometers at depths to 600 meters.

Number of Robots: 2

A modular AUV, the Gavia can create 3-D sonar plots, while its cameras capture video and images.  An acoustic modem, not too dissimilar from a Wi-Fi modem, provides researchers status updates of its progress and helps locate it if it gets lost. Text messages via satellite communications when the vehicle surfaces inform scientists about the AUV’s position and mission status. Missions can run 3-4 hours over 15-20 kilometers at depths to 500 meters.

Number of Robots: 2

These AUVs are used for long-term missions for environmental monitoring, habitat monitoring and large area oceanographic studies. They can measure water quality over great distances. While deployed, gliders periodically surface and use satellite communications to report their position and status, providing the research team an opportunity to change their mission. Missions can last 1-90 days over hundreds of kilometers and depths to 1 kilometer.

A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is controlled by an operator through a 300-meter tether cable. Equipped with many add-ons, this robotic system can conduct low-visibility sonar mapping, real-time video surveying, data collection and grab sampling.

Equipped with high-definition cameras and GPS technology, aerial vehicles like quadcopters and fixed-wing drones give scientists a top-down view of our planet from up to 300 meters in the air. They are transported and deployed by a single operator, and can soar above and capture high-resolution video and images.

Robotic Discovery Laboratories

161 Otis H. Smith Laboratory
College Drive
Lewes, DE 19958


 
Satellite receiving station equipment installation on the roof of Willard Hall

Satellite Receiving Station

The equipment benefits faculty and others who study changes in the mid-Atlantic environment. The station consists of an X-Band receiver for reception of the MODIS family of satellites which allows for the study of sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll concentrations, land surface temperatures, and vegetation patterns. An L-band receiver allows for the reception of NOAA, MetOP, and Fung-yen satellites to study atmospheric conditions, land surface temperatures, and sea surface temperatures. Read more >

Office Location:

Center for Environmental Monitoring & Analysis (CEMA)

216 Pearson Hall
Newark, DE 19716-2541
Phone: (302) 831-2294
Fax: (302) 831-6654
Email: udsrs-info@udel.edu

Please feel free to contact us regarding the UD SRS or any of our output products.

SRS Equipment Location:

Willard Hall Education Building (equipment on the roof)
16 West Main Street
Newark, DE  19716

http://udsrs.udel.edu/index.php


 
Class field trip to the wind turbine Lewes, Del.

Wind Turbine

UD and the former Gamesa Technology Corporation (now Siemens Gamesa) joined forces to install a 2-megawatt wind turbine. The turbine is used for research and education, as well as generating enough renewable energy to power the campus and about 100 homes in town for much of the year. Read more >

Wind Turbine

UD College of Earth, Ocean & Environment
Hugh R. Sharp Campus
Lewes, DE 19958

Wind Turbine Website