Graduate Student Seminar Series

The Graduate Student Seminar Series provides an opportunity for graduate students at UD to share their research with the community at large.

Gene Anthony Santiago-Holt, M.F.A.
Gene Anthony Santiago-Holt, M.F.A.

11/17/2021

Noise, Performance, and the Digital

This lecture will give an insight into a personal perspective on online counter culture. During the past year broadcasting software was used for DJ sets, art shows, and for elaborate concerts. This creative time was pushed to the limit by an exploration of sound, noise, animation, and various other multimedia creative outlets. Niche online cultures and aesthetics have flourished this past year from hyperpop dance parties to full blown noise fests but with that the goal of this talk is to answer the questions that arise in this digital wasteland: What things are left unheard in the online space in comparison to the physical space? What do you do when you have limited resources and materials? Has the pandemic shifted digital art to be a legitimate form of “high art”, or will there always be a bias towards digital art?

Gene Anthony Santiago-Holt is a multimedia artist from Philadelphia. He creates drawings and papier-mâché masks that function as props, and as alter-egos for his improvised video performances. His heavily processed videos incorporate original audio and imagery including childhood photographs, pop-culture references, and religious iconography to reconcile his mixed heritage and troubled familial relationships. He has exhibited internationally at PiranesiLAB in Moscow, Russia; American University in Washington, DC; The Glitter Box Theater in Pittsburgh, PA, and various other venues in the United States. Santiago-Holt graduated from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2015 with a Bachelors of Fine Arts in sculpture and a concentration in printmaking. He is currently an MFA candidate in the Department of Art and Design at the University of Delaware, where he also teaches undergraduate printmaking and design classes.

2021-2022 Past Seminars

Nora Carleson, History Ph.D.
Nora Carleson, History Ph.D.

The Progressive Era was a time of social, political, and cultural upheaval. Years of unprecedented immigration and industrialization, the end of Reconstruction and the formation of Jim Crow, growing disparities between rich and poor and “native” and new comer, as well as questions as to the country’s role as a global imperial force in the wake of American wars in Cuba and the Philippines and World War I all raised questions of who and what was American. During this time a group of American designers, educators, industrialists, and journalists came together to promote a new and “distinctly American” style of women’s fashions. This “war of fashion independence” sought to overthrow France as the arbiter of style for American women. Behind the calls for patriotic support of American made and designed clothing were overlapping and contradicting beliefs in nationalism, nativism, suffrage, white supremacy, and eugenic theory which guided the actions of a campaign and its supporters and the styles of clothing they made. Through the campaigns for an “American Fashion for American Women” we see how our clothing both revealed and shaped political and cultural thought in America’s Progressive Era.

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Erin Fogarty, Plant and Soil Science Master's
Erin Fogarty, Plant and Soil Science Master's

When historic landscapes are preserved, often the first course of action is often stabilizing and restoring the built environment, like paths and statuary, with plantings swapped out for less high-maintenance species. However, for Arts and Crafts landscapes like the works of Marian Cruger Coffin, one of the country’s first professionally-trained female landscape architects, the plant palette plays a vital role in the character of the space. Gibraltar, located on the edge of downtown Wilmington, Delaware, is one such landscape. This work examines how we might restore the planting plans to Marian Coffin’s original intent while balancing the space’s current management, environmental, and social needs.

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Future Seminars