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Jan. 24: Eating disorders movie night - soldout

Photo by Aaron Davis

“Lecture and a Movie: Eating Disorders” at Main Street Movies 5

 

Update:   Tickets to this free event have all been claimed, as of Jan. 23.

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From Jan. 3:

Community members are invited to join the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences on Wednesday, Jan. 24 at Main Street Movies 5 for “Lecture and a Movie: Eating Disorders.” The event, which begins at 6:15 p.m., includes a panel discussion, questions from the audience and a film showing of “To the Bone,” a drama chronicling a young woman’s struggle with anorexia. The UD panelists are Carly Pacanowski (Behavioral Health and Nutrition), Sharon Collison (STAR Health; Behavioral Health and Nutrition) and Michelle Juarez-Huffaker (Center for Counseling and Student Development).

“This topic impacts so many individuals and their loved ones,” said CHS communications specialist Dante LaPenta. “You’ll have a chance to learn from our panelists and ask questions before watching the film.”

About eating disorders

Surveys estimate that 20 million women and 10 million men in America will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives, according to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). Eating disorders are psychiatric illnesses, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorders. These illnesses have one of the highest mortality rates of all psychiatric illnesses.

“You cannot necessarily tell if someone has an eating disorder by looking at them, just as you cannot assume someone is healthy based on appearance alone,” said Pacanowski.

These complex diseases often start with disordered eating behaviors, such as strict and rigid dieting for weight loss, vomiting or exercising specifically to counteract calories in meals, and a fear of fatness.

Disordered eating is generally defined as when a person engages in abnormal eating habits on a regular basis. Disordered eaters can eventually develop eating disorders. The difference is in the frequency and severity of the person's behavior, and the corresponding stress.

About the panel

Carly Pacanowski is an assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition. Her research interests include prevention of disordered eating/eating disorders in the young adult population, individual’s relationships with their body weight, weight stability or fluctuation over time, behavioral weight-control methods, and obesity.

Sharon Collison is a registered dietitian at STAR Health and an instructor of clinical nutrition for the Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition. She specializes in eating disorders/disordered eating, weight management, sports nutrition, cardiovascular and wellness nutrition.

Michelle Juarez-Huffaker is a licensed psychologist for the Center for Counseling and Student Development. She has practiced in the Newark and Wilmington areas for the last 17 years. Some of her specializations include eating disorders, depression, anxiety, multicultural counseling and training.  

See the event on Facebook.


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