UD The Green
Buildings

HISTORY | NEWS | VIEWS | EXTRAS | UD HOME

The Green >> Buildings–The North Green

THE NORTH GREEN >> Go to South Green

Harter Hall Sharp Hall Wolf Hall Du Pont Hall Evans Lab Brown Lab Memorial Hall
Hullihen Hall Mitchell Hall Gore Hall Sharp Lab Sypherd Hall Brown Hall .

Wolf Hall
Wolf Hall
The first occupant of The Green as envisioned by the architectural firm of Day & Klauder, Wolf Hall was initially built to house Delaware College’s agricultural science and chemistry programs. Completed in the fall of 1917, it housed 42,400 square feet of classrooms, labs and preparatory rooms, storage space and faculty offices. It was named for Theodore R. Wolf, the first UD faculty member to earn a Ph.D. and the longest-serving faculty member of Delaware College. Wolf Hall was remodeled in 1952, and an addition was completed in 1965. A major renovation is currently under way. The west façade has remained unchanged, a testament to the University’s commitment to expansion and historical preservation.

Top of page

Du Pont hall
Du Pont Hall
Du Pont Hall was built to relieve overcrowding in an adjacent engineering building, Evans Hall. At the start, the building had a very utilitarian design. To suitably honor the building’s namesake, Pierre S. du Pont, his brother-in-law, alumnus and benefactor H. Rodney Sharp initiated a fundraising campaign among du Pont family members to pay for enhancements to the building’s façade. In 1961, a Georgian-style portico was added to maintain The Green’s architectural style. A three-story addition of 60,000 square feet has updated the building’s appearance once again and has completed the original vision for The Green. Du Pont Hall’s state-of-the-art laboratories and teaching facilities support the Departments of Material Science and Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Top of page

Memorial Hall
Memorial Hall
This building, which memorializes Delaware’s World War I dead, was dedicated on May 23, 1925, as a library located between the Men’s and Women’s Colleges. Funds were raised for the building from the people of Delaware, including a parade of school children soliciting funds through the streets of Wilmington. At the groundbreaking in 1923, male students, alumni and faculty joined President Walter Hullihen in excavating the basement as students from the Women’s College cheered them. The cornerstone laying in June 1924 coincided with the two colleges’ first joint commencement. A major $9.8 million renovation was completed in 1999.

Top of page

Hullihen Hall
Hullihen Hall
Hullihen Hall, originally known as University Hall, was built in 1940 to serve as the first classroom building shared by students of the-then Delaware College and Women’s College (combined to become the University of Delaware in 1921). The building was renamed in 1952 in honor of former President Walter Hullihen, who served from 1920-44. In 1969, the building was renovated and a west wing was added. Today, Hullihen is home to the central administration of the University and to several student-related units.

Top of page

Mitchell Hall
Mitchell Hall
On a warm spring night in May 1930, the first of many decades of musicians and performers mounted the stage of Mitchell Hall for the first time. An organist played the building’s showcase instrument, a massive pipe organ once owned by Pierre S. du Pont and donated to the University by H. Rodney Sharp; a professor directed a one-act play he had written and the Women’s College Glee Club sang harmonies. Little did those first performers know that over the years this tidy auditorium on The Green would host performers as diverse as their talents. Consider the Iceland Symphony, the Japanese Demon Drummers, Chicago City Limits and Lavay Smith and Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Broadway and television star Mandy Patinkin performed in 1993 at the building’s rededication after a major refurbishing and other well-known celebrities such as Ravi Shankar, Andrés Segovia and Dick Cavett have performed there as well. Built between 1929-1930, it was named for Samuel Chiles Mitchell, University president from 1914-20.

Top of page

Gore Hall
Gore Hall
When construction started on Gore Hall in the spring of 1996, those interested could watch construction progress via a web cam on the World Wide Web. A web site shows a time-compressed video of the construction from start to finish in less than one minute at [http://www.udel.edu/UMS/gore/]. The first addition to The Green since 1962, this classroom building was the gift of Mrs. W.L. Gore and her son, trustee Robert W. Gore, ‘59, and his wife, Sally Gore, ‘76M. Gore Hall features a three-story central atrium surrounded by 17 general classrooms, four seminar rooms, three tiered case-study rooms and one Problem-Based Learning classroom.

Top of page