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History Currents Newsletter
Fall 2012, Number 54

Letter from the Chair

Dear Friends of the History Department,

Welcome to the new electronic edition of our History Newsletter, written and compiled by my valued colleague, Darryl Flaherty. There’s a good deal of information about our recent accomplishments and endeavors, and I hope you will find this information of great interest.

Faculty, graduate students, and graduate and undergraduate alumni have all had something to report. Please join me in congratulating the winners of awards and honors and those recognized for significant academic accomplishments. 

Do let us know if you have something of your own to share with us. We are always happy to post your activities to our website.

Faculty are more committed to their teaching than ever and remain active in research and publication too. Our group of new graduate students bring imagination and dedication to the profession and will invigorate us all. Recent graduate alumni have found good academic jobs. History majors and minors remain, as always, a lively and stimulating group. I look forward to our Honors Banquet next May when it will be our privilege to hand out awards and to recognize the high level achievements that are now under way. For more information on all these points, please consult that electronic newsletter, which appears below.

The semester has gotten off to a good start. We are offering our usual wide array of courses, which in sum cover virtually the entire globe. We now have courses in environmental history, taught by our new colleague, Professor Adam Rome. You will be hearing more about him and the Environmental Humanities Minor (a work in progress) in the near future.

Those readers on or near campus will want to follow the progress of our planning for our Spring 2012 program, the “Emancipation Semester.” We intend to honor President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation on its 150th anniversary. We will have quite a lot going on, so do stay tuned.

I wish everyone a good Fall Semester, and I hope to see many of you before too long. 

All best wishes,

John J. Hurt, Chair, Department of History

Munroe Hall Munroe Hall Dedication Munroe Hall

HISTORY NEWS

by Darryl Flaherty, Associate Professor

Emancipation Semester Spring 2013

During the Spring Semester 2013, the Department of History will mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation with an exploration of its domestic and global legacies. Professors Boylan, Buckley, Armstrong-Dunbar, Grier, Lopez-Denis, Russ, and Suisman are planning activities on campus and in the community. The department’s regularly scheduled History Workshop series on Tuesdays will feature a set of presentations on the theme of emancipation in its multiple geographic and temporal dimensions. The department will provide a number of speakers for a campus-wide course co-sponsored by Women’s Studies and Black American Studies. The workshop series and the course will be open to the public. At the Morris Library, visitors will be able to view materials from the Lincoln Collection in its Special Collections. In Wilmington, the department will join with the Delaware Historical Society to offer a symposium on “Emancipation and its Legacies” on Saturday, April 6. Participants will have an opportunity to hear U.S. poet laureate, Natasha Trethewey, who writes poetry informed by issues of memory and race. The semester will culminate in mid April. On Thursday April 18, Professor David Blight of Yale University, a leading scholar of the Civil War and its legacies, will deliver the William Watson Harrington Lecture. The lecture honors Harrington, an alumnus (1895) and 59-year member of the University of Delaware’s Board of Trustees. The following day, Prof. Blight will offer a colloquium on recent research. For more information, please visit the Emancipation Semester website

Emancipation painting by Carpenter

The first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation before the cabinet.
Painted by F.B. Carpenter; engraved by A.H. Ritchie, c1866. (Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction Number:
LC-USZ62-2070 DLC)

 

Alumni Award

Deirdre Bosley and David WarnockThe University of Delaware College of Arts and Sciences recognized history alum David L. Warnock (1980) for his extraordinary support of the college and its mission. Warnock graduated with a double major in history and economics and is now a senior partner and co-founder of Camden Partners, a private equity firm in Baltimore. Warnock and his wife, alumna Deirdre Bosley have been long-time supporters of the department and sponsor the biannual Warnock-Bosley lectures that bring scholars of European history to the University of Delaware’s campus. Bosley and Warnock have also sponsored a graduate fellowship in history at the university.

Faculty News

Anne Boylan Anne Boylan was the inaugural recipient of the Torch Award. The UD Women's Caucus recognized Dr. Boylan’s contribution to women's equality, including both her efforts on the President's Commission on the Status of Women and her mentoring of fellow faculty and students. Dr. Boylan’s ongoing dedication to the recruitment and retention of women and minority faculty extends to the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math with participation in the National Science Foundation-funded ADVANCE group in the College of Engineering. A dedicated teacher, Dr. Boylan recently completed six years as a co-director for the Teaching American History program for social studies teachers in Delaware.

The University of Delaware’s Provost and President recently appointed James Brophy the Francis Squire Professor of History. The appointment recognizes his achievements as a scholar and an educator. From the National Endowment for the Humanities, Dr. Brophy received a summer research fellowship for archival research on the project: “Citizens of Print: Democratic Publishers in Germany, 1770-1850.” Recent publications include book chapters on censorship and publishing in the German states during the first half of the nineteenth century (“Preußische Zensur und deutsche Verleger im Vormärz: Der Fall Heinrich Hoff,” in Das literarische Leben des 19. Jahrhundert im Spiegel der Zensur) and “Which Political Nation? Soft Borders and Popular Nationhood in the Rhineland, 1800-1850” in Nationhood from Below: Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century.

Eve Buckley participated in a UD Area Studies lecture series on “The Future” with a talk titled “Brazil: Still the Land of the Future?”

Jesús Cruz gave a talk in the Tertulia lecture series sponsored by UD’s Latin American and Iberian Studies program that, in addition to cultivating historical knowledge, also gave students and faculty an opportunity to maintain or improve language skills. Dr. Cruz’s presentation, in Spanish, focused on “Tourists of Modernity: The ‘Grand Tour’ by Southern Europeans in the Nineteenth Century” (Turistas de la Modernidad: El 'Gran Tour' de los Europeos del Sur en el Siglo XIX).

Rebecca Davisreceived recognition for high scholarly achievements from near and far. Close to home, the Board of Trustees promoted Dr. Davis to associate professor.  Meanwhile, in Berkeley, California, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Religious Archives Network honored Dr. Davis with its Religious History Award for the essay “‘My Homosexuality Is Getting Worse Every Day’: Norman Vincent Peale, Psychiatry, and the Liberal Protestant Response to Same-Sex Desires in Mid-Twentieth-Century America.”

Erica Armstrong Dunbar received the 2012 Ujima Award from the University of Delaware’s Department of Black American Studies for outstanding work cultivating a vital intellectual community for students and fellow faculty. The Swahili term ujima, the third principle of the Nguzo Saba (the seven principles of Kwanzaa), celebrates “collective work and responsibility.” 

Willard and Jean Fletcher Emeritus professor Willard Allen Fletcher, along with Jean Tucker Fletcher, edited Defiant Diplomat. George Platt Waller. American Consul in Nazi-Occupied Luxembourg, 1939-1941 (University of Delaware Press, 2012).

Katherine Grier received the Hunter-Burley Prize, conferred by the Small Museum Association for service to small museums in professional training and graduate education. Under Dr. Grier’s leadership, the Museum Studies Program has continued to support such small museums as the Auburn Heights Preserve in Yorklyn, Delaware, with an ongoing grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The grant has allowed graduate and undergraduate students to document and catalog local collections.

Hannah Kim presented a paper on “Teaching U.S. History to American Students: Content, Skills, and Pedagogy” at the General Education and University Curriculum Reform Conference in Hong Kong. Dr. Kim received travel support from the department and the Institute for Global Studies.

Peter Kolchin, Henry Clay Reed Professor of History, assumes the vice presidency of the Southern Historical Association in November 2012 and will become president of the Association at the conclusion of the November 2013 convention. This is in addition to service as a member of 2013 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize jury (awarded annually for a book on Abraham Lincoln, an American Civil War soldier, or a subject relating to the Civil War era) and continued membership on the executive board of the Organization of American Historians. Dr. Kolchin’s recent publications include an article in the Journal of the Civil War Era, "Comparative Perspectives on Emancipation in the U. S. South: Reconstruction, Radicalism, and Russia."

As part of the University of Delaware’s “Women's History, Women's Lives” series, Wunyabari Maloba introduced and discussed the film Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Matthai on the Nobel Peace Laureate who founded the Green Belt Movement in Kenya.

Cathy Matson’s recent publications include an article in the William and Mary Quarterly, “Imperial Political Economy: An Ideological Debate and Shifting Practices.” In September 2012, Dr. Matson gave the opening lecture at the Columbia University Seminar on Early American Culture on "Crossing Empires: Philadelphia's Trade with New Orleans, Havana, and Cap François at the End of the Eighteenth Century."

Rudi Matthee, John A. Munroe and Dorothy L. Munroe Chair of History, has recently published Persia in Crisis: Safavid Decline and the Fall of Isfahan. This book received the British-Kuwaiti Friendship Book Prize for the “best scholarly work in English on the Middle East…published…in the United Kingdom.” Other published works by Dr. Matthee include a chapter on "The Portuguese Presence in the Persian Gulf" in Imperial Crossroads: The Great Powers and the Persian Gulf; a book chapter on Iranian perceptions of Russia in Iran Facing Others: Identity Boundaries in Historical Perspective; and an introduction to a work on the Carmelites in Persia during the 17th and 18th centuries. Dr. Matthee was also the editor of a special issue of ACTA Iranica and has been invited to serve as editor of a leading journal for Middle East and Islamic Studies, Der Islam. In addition, Dr. Matthee has recently given talks across the globe on the Safavid Empire and its decline, including presentations at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; a symposium on modern empire in Sapporo, Japan; and a conference on Iran in Istanbul. Rudi Matthee and Fariba Amini
 
Rudi Matthee and Fariba Amini

Arwen Mohun led a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded two-week Delaware Public Humanities Institute (DELPHI) on material culture research in history, literature, art history, and art conservation at the University of Delaware’s Wilmington Campus. History graduate students Nalleli Guillen, Ai Hisano, Alison Kreitzer, and Stephanie Lampkin received grants to participate in the Institute. As part of a UD film series on women’s history and lives, Dr. Mohun discussed a documentary on the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, Triangle Fire.

John Montaño

 

John Montaño gave the plenary address at The Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference at University College Dublin: “Humiliation, Destruction and Death: Violence and Cultural Difference in Tudor and Stuart Ireland.” 

David Pong appeared as a panelist on the theme “Developing General Education in Hong Kong Universities, 2008-2012” at the Capstone Conference for the Fulbright Hong Kong General Education Program, organized by the Hong Kong American Center (City University of Hong Kong). He also organized a panel—“Designing and Teaching about One’s Native Culture and History in a General Education Curriculum”—for the General Education and University Curriculum Reform conference. Dr. Pong’s paper at this international conference discussed “Teaching China’s Civilization in a Chinese (Hong Kong) Environment:  What to Teach and How to Teach It.” Dr. Pong received travel support from the department and the Institute for Global Studies.

Ram Rawat published the South Asian edition of his groundbreaking Reconsidering Untouchability: Chamars and Dalit History in North India (Permanent Black, 2012), with ringing praise from Cambridge University’s Chris Bayly and Jawharlal Nehru University’s Gopal Guru. An enthusiastic teacher, Dr. Rawat is contributing to a series of workshops on “Integrating India into the Liberal Arts Curriculum” at Winston-Salem State University.

In the spring Adam Rome, recent addition to the Department, joined a panel discussion titled “Getting to Know You: Why Environmental Scientists, Humanists and Social Scientists Need Each Other and How They Can Join Forces to Save the Planet.” The event was part of the second Delaware Environmental Institute (DENIN) Research Symposium aimed at fostering interdisciplinary approaches to environmental challenges.

David Shearer will share the conclusions from his monograph Policing Stalin's Socialism: Repression and Social Order in the Soviet Union, 1924-1953 in two visiting scholar positions in Europe this fall. At the École des hautes études en science sociales in Paris he will lead graduate seminars on Soviet history. Then he will hold a position at Humboldt University in Berlin. While in Europe, he will also give talks on Stalin in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Tuebingen, Germany. Russian academic publisher Rosspen recently purchased rights for Policing Stalin's Socialism, which is now in translation.  Dr. Shearer’s new research includes the study of foreign explorers in Central Asia, supported by various UD grants.

Steve Sidebotham published “The Red Sea and Indian Ocean in the Age of the Great Empires” in A Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, Volume II and co-authored with Iwona Zych, “Berenike: Archaeological Fieldwork at a Ptolemaic-Roman Port on the Red Sea Coast of Egypt 2011-2012” for the journal Sahara.  Through conference proceedings and public lectures, Dr. Sidebotham has presented the results of his archaeological field work in venues as varied as Ruse, Bulgaria; Cairo, Egypt; and Wilmington, Delaware. Dr. Sidebotham’s excavations at Berenike on the Red Sea coast of Egypt and also in the desert hinterland between the Red Sea coast and the Nile will continue during the winter of 2012-2013, permits and funding permitting. Since 2008, this research has been a joint effort under the aegis of the University of Delaware and the Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology of the University of Warsaw with financial support from the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (NYU), private donors, the co-directors of the project (Iwona Zych and Dr. Sidebotham), the History Department, and the Office of the Dean (UD). Dr. Sidebotham’s book on this work, Berenike and the Ancient Maritime Spice Route, was recently the focus of an article in the Dutch publication of National Geographic. In addition to delving into the archaeology of the Roman Age, Dr. Sidebotham—along with graduate student Mary Sidebotham—have since 2004 interviewed 183 veterans of World War II as part of an oral history project. Veterans from the United States, Germany, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, Canada, Poland, Italy, Czechoslovakia, Japan, and Belgium have participated. [Note from Dr. Sidebotham: Should any of our readers know of World War II veterans who may be willing to tell us their stories, we would very much like to get in touch with them. (ses@udel.edu)

Susan Strasser, Richards Chair of American History, recently published “A Historical Herbal: Household Medicine and Herbal Commerce in a Developing Consumer Society” in the book Decoding Modern Consumer Societies. As part of an Environmental Humanities Working Group discussion of Susan Freinkel’s book Plastic: A Toxic Love Story and the documentary film Bag It, Dr. Strasser explored the question—Are our lives too plastic?—for UD’s Earth Week. Dr. Strasser also gave a talk in a Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars/National Women’s History Museum sponsored lecture series, The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women's History entitled “You Call That Women’s History? Real Housewives vs. Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.”

David Suisman has become a regular reference for journalists writing on the music industry. The Wall Street Journal recently queried Dr. Suisman on performance royalties—residual payments to artists who perform music. The paper also drew on Dr. Suisman’s scholarship in a piece that compared early-twentieth century songwriters to authors of twenty-first century smartphone and tablet apps.

Owen White recently co-edited and co-authored the introduction to In God's Empire: French Missionaries and the Modern World (Oxford University Press, 2012). This global history of French missionary activity has won praise from scholars, including New York University’s Edward Berenson, who lauded it for exploring “the ambiguities of modernity, the tensions of empire, the limits of secularism, and the persistence of European influence in a globalized, postcolonial world.”

 

Graduate Alumni News

Regina Lee Blaszczyk (Ph.D./Boylan/1995) has recently published The Color Revolution (MIT Press, 2012). Dr. Blaszcyk is a visiting scholar in the Department of the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Design History.

Beth Georgian (Ph.D./Heyrman/2011) was appointed tenure-track assistant professor of history at University of South Carolina at Aiken.

Carolyn Goldstein (Ph.D./Boylan and Hounshell/1994) has published Creating Consumers (University of North Carolina Press, 2012).  Dr. Goldstein is an independent scholar and museum consultant.

Brooke Hunter (Ph.D./Matson/2001), associate professor of history, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, won the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award at Rider.

Neil Lanctot

 

Neil Lanctot (Ph.D./Wolters/2002) came in second for the 2012 Seymour Medal, conferred by the Society of American Baseball Research for the best book in baseball history or biography, for his Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella. Dr. Lanctot won the Seymour Medal in 2005 for his Negro League Baseball: The Rise and Fall of a Black Institution (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).

Colleen Rafferty (Ph.D./Matson/2012), whose dissertation examined eighteenth century economic networks in the Mid-Atlantic, was recently hired for a full-time position at the National Archives in Philadelphia.

Christine E. Sears (Ph.D./Kolchin/2007), who is now teaching at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, has a forthcoming book entitled American Slaves and African Masters: Algiers and the Western Sahara, 1776-1820 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).

Ted Sickler (Ph.D./Matson/2012), whose dissertation analyzes servants in the early republican Pennsylvania backcountry, has a position as an editor of the central Pennsylvania magazine, The Patriot-News, and is an adjunct professor in American Studies at Lebanon Valley College. He will seek tenured employment in fall 2012.

Janneken Smucker (Ph.D./Strasser/2010) was appointed tenure-track assistant professor in digital history at West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania.

Lilly Santoro Williams (Ph.D./Heyrman/2011) was appointed tenure-track assistant professor of history at Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
 

Graduate Student News

Grad Award Winners
Graduate Student Award Winners from left: Alyce Graham, Toni Pitock, Kevin Barry and Jeffery Appelhans.

Jeffery Appelhans (Ph.D.) received from the department a Stanley J. & Marion Goldfus Memorial Award for excellence as a teaching assistant.

Kevin Barry (Ph.D.) won the department’s John A. Munroe Memorial Award for the graduate student who has excelled in developing and teaching his or her own course. 

Christine Croxall (Ph.D./Heyrman) was one of three graduate students in the department to receive a grant through the Global Research Internship and Performances Grants Program. Croxall’s project involves archival research in Paris and Lyon, France on Catholic missionaries in the Mississippi River Valley for “Holy Waters,” her dissertation on intercultural religious exchange at the turn of the nineteenth century.

Kate Duffy (M.A./2012) won a Fulbright Award to conduct research on the “Ruins of Quebec” in Montreal, Canada, a study of urban history and memory. Duffy received her master of arts in history and a certificate in museum studies in May. She was also the recipient of the Daniel Walden Prize for her paper, “Hopeless Maniacs, Physical Wrecks: Ruined Women and the ‘Oriental Cult’ Scare, 1918,” presented at the Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association. Duffy wrote the essay in Dr. Davis’s research and writing seminar in Spring 2011.

Alyce Graham (Ph.D) won the department’s Alumni Award for Best Printed Article or Seminar Paper by a graduate student that was completed in the spring or fall semesters during the preceding calendar year. 

Della Hall (M.A.), Museum Studies Certificate Program, worked with archival collections at the Hagley Library as a summer intern.  

Ashley Hlebinsky (M.A.), Museum Studies Certificate Program, worked in the curatorial department of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming as a summer intern.  

Kelli Huggins (M.A.), Museum Studies Certificate Program, spent her summer at the Auburn Heights Preserve, Delaware's newest state park.  

Arielle L’Esperance (M.A.) received recognition for writing the best paper by a graduate student at the Geiss Student Research on Women Conference—an essay on women and chocolate. L’Esperance’s paper emerged out of Dr. Buckley’s graduate seminar on nature and nation in Latin American history.

Josh Probert (Ph.D./Grier) was one of three graduate students in the department to receive a grant through the Global Research Internship and Performances Grants Program. The grant supports his research on Tiffany Studio’s stained glass work in churches, including travel to the Louis C. Comfort Tiffany Museum in Nagoya, Japan to explore its holdings of catalogs and design books.

Kelsey Ransick (M.A.), Museum Studies Certificate Program, interned this summer at Winterthur in the library.

Lee Roueche (M.A.), Museum Studies Certificate Program, worked with the History Affiliates Program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania as a summer intern.

John Sharpe (Ph.D./Wolters) was one of three graduate students in the department to receive a grant through the Global Research Internship and Performances Grants Program. The grant was for research in materials critiquing capitalism and property ownership from outside of the Marxist tradition that are held in private collections, archives, universities, and museums in the UK.

Toni Pitock (Ph.D./Matson) has won the department’s Colonial Dames Award, the Dean’s Doctoral Student Summer Scholar Award, and a Stanley J. & Marion Goldfus Memorial Award for excellence as a teaching assistant.

 

Undergraduate News

The following awards had multiple recipients: Center for Secondary Education’s Outstanding Student Teaching Award (4); Clift (2); Craven (3); Delta Kappa Gamma (a junior and senior major); Fragner (2); Meakin (2); student teaching awards (for lesson activities, learning environment, and planning—2 each); and William H. Williams Awards (2).

Mark Arem

Michael Brophy

Caprice Torrance
Mark Arem won one of the department’s William H. Williams Awards for history majors who demonstrate outstanding scholarship focusing on Colonial America to 1865. Michael Brophy won the department’s other Eve Clift Memorial Award for an outstanding senior history major in memory of Professor Eve Clift.  Jennifer Ferris won the Edward H. Rosenberry Undergraduate Writing Award for her essay “Margaret Sanger: A Pragmatic Crusader for Contraception” written in Dr. Davis’ course on the History of Sexuality. Ferris also won a Delta Kappa Gamma Award.

Andrew Berni won one of the department’s Eve Clift Memorial Award for outstanding senior history majors in memory of Professor Eve Clift.

Carolyn Clark won the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Essay prize for "A Prairie Migration Story: When the Strange Became Familiar," an essay written in an undergraduate research seminar taught by Dr. Boylan.

Julia Coleman won a Delta Kappa Gamma Award. She also won a History/Social Studies Education award for Effective and Innovative Lesson Activities.

Caitlynn Coster won the Center for Secondary Education’s Outstanding Student Teaching Award.

Michael Fink received from the department a William E. Meakin Memorial Award for a history major who meets the scholarship criteria of academic performance and who has a distinguished record of community service.

Fletcher Prize winner
Margaret Gammie (center) receives the Willard Allen Fletcher Prize from Jean and Willard Fletcher

Margaret Gammie won the department’s Alumni Undergraduate Award in History for the junior or senior history major with the highest history grade point average (and an overall grade point average of 3.5 and above) and the Willard Allen Fletcher Prize given for a research essay by a history education major that evidences authenticity and integrity in presentation and documentation in honor of former department chair Willard Allen Fletcher—for her essay “Entrenched in Religious Nationalism: The Church of England during World War I” written in Dr. John Bernstein’s seminar for majors on World War I.

Allison Gerni won the Secondary Education Award for Educational Promise.

Brittany Kalchman won the Alumni Undergraduate Award for History Education for Outstanding Student Teacher Overall and a History/Social Studies Education award for Most Effective Lesson Planning.

Amanda Kee won the department’s Old Home Prize for an essay on the history of Delaware & the Eastern Shore.        

Abigail Kirstein received from the department a William E. Meakin Memorial Award for a history major who meets the scholarship criteria of academic performance and who has a distinguished record of community service.

Ian Lawrence received a Berwyn Fragner Memorial Award from the department awarded to a returning student on the basis of academic merit.

Matthew McFadden received from the department a Thomas J. Craven Prize awarded for an outstanding essay by an undergraduate on American political or constitutional history, broadly interpreted, or Delaware History.

Thomas Miller received from the department a Thomas J. Craven Prize awarded for an excellent essay by an undergraduate on American political or constitutional history, broadly interpreted, or Delaware History.

Patrick Mulshnock won the History/Social Studies Education award for Exceptional Overall Learning Environment.

Lindsey Melvin

Jacquelyn Peck

Caprice Torrance
Lindsey Melvin won the Center for Secondary Education’s Outstanding Student Teaching Award and a History/Social Studies Education award for Exceptional Overall Learning Environment. Jacquelyn Peck won the department’s Stewart Internship awarded to an undergraduate for summer employment at a Delaware historical agency. Caprice Torrance received from the department a Thomas J. Craven Prize awarded for an excellent essay by an undergraduate on American political or constitutional history, broadly interpreted, or Delaware History.

Alexandra Roberts won the Center for Secondary Education’s Outstanding Student Teaching Award.

Steven Talay won one of the department’s William H. Williams Awards for history majors who demonstrate outstanding scholarship focusing on Colonial America to 1865. 

Lindsay Tietze won the Center for Secondary Education’s Outstanding Student Teaching Award and the History/Social Studies Education award for Effective and Innovative Lesson Activities.

Elizabeth Toussaint received a Berwyn Fragner Memorial Award from the department awarded to a returning student on the basis of academic merit.

O'Hara Award
John Viotto receiving the Ryan O'Hara from Barbara and Terrence O'Hara

John Viotto won the Ryan O’Hara History Award for a History Education major who shows dedication to the Program, who is respected by other students and department faculty, and shows overall spirit to UD education.

Scott Wissocki won a History/Social Studies Education award for Most Effective Lesson Planning.
 
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  • Department of History  •   236 John Munroe Hall   •   Newark, DE 19716  •   USA
    Phone: 302-831-2371  •   Fax: 302-831-1538