Majoring in Criminal Justice

2007 2008


Criminal Justice Requirements
Bachelor of Arts Degree
Double Major or Interdepartmental Major
Course Offerings
Careers in Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice as a Pre-Law Major
Information and Advisement
Graduate Study in Criminal Justice
Faculty

The Criminal Justice Program at the University of Delaware offers undergraduate students an opportunity to pursue interdisciplinary studies leading to law school, graduate school, or a career in the administration of justice. The program is structured around a core of criminal justice courses on such topics as law enforcement, the judicial process, juvenile justice, corrections, and the criminal law.  Since any criminal justice system does not exist in isolation but naturally reflects the structure, ideas, and concerns of the society in which it operates, the Criminal Justice Program draws from a wide variety of academic disciplines. Therefore, although administratively housed within the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, the Criminal Justice curriculum includes courses in political science, psychology, history, and at least one foreign language, as well as in sociology.

 

At the University of Delaware, a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice is viewed as a social science/liberal arts degree. Students receive no "hands-on" training in self defense, fingerprint analysis, ballistics, or any other kind of practical, job-related skill. The emphasis is placed on theory, research, and the analysis of substantive law. The curriculum also stresses the importance of representative courses in the arts and humanities, mathematics, and science. Consequently, graduating criminal justice majors will have achieved the skills and breadth of knowledge expected of well educated men and women in a complex and pluralistic society.

 

Students may become criminal justice majors in one of two ways. First, any incoming freshman or transfer student may choose criminal justice as a major. These students are expected to demonstrate both the ability and the commitment to perform well in all of their course work. Second, matriculated students who have already declared another major or who presently are undeclared may transfer into the Criminal Justice Program if their overall cumulative grade point average at the University of Delaware is at least 2.0. Students wishing to discuss the possibility of declaring a criminal justice major may contact Dr. Eric Rise, the Associate Chairperson for the Criminal Justice Program, 325 Smith Hall (302-831-1236).

 

An integral component of the Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice is the field experience -- a directed practicum with a criminal justice agency that gives the highly motivated student the opportunity to bridge the gap between the theory and the practice of criminal justice. The field experience is an optional course which is graded on a pass/fail basis and which counts as a free elective. In the field experience, students are provided the opportunity to work on a firsthand basis in actual agency situations. Each field experience also includes a series of seminars directed by a faculty member and designed to help students integrate the field experience with their classroom learning. Students who are already employed in the criminal justice system are encouraged to discuss with the faculty how their program of study might be adapted to fit their individual needs and contribute to their career goals.

 

THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS

 

 

Under the requirements for a B.A. degree, a student must complete a minimum of 124 credits. For criminal justice majors, 49 of these credits are fulfilled by taking criminal justice courses and related courses in sociology, psychology, and political science. Most of the remaining credits are devoted to general education requirements in written communications, mathematics, humanities, history, social science, natural science, multicultural awareness, and foreign languages. The remainder of the credits are satisfied with free electives of the student's own choosing. An up-to-date list of all the courses that satisfy the general education requirements is available online at: <www.udcatalog.udel.edu/arts/undergrad/asugbreadth.html>.

 

The requirements for the B.A. degree are as follows:

Bachelor of Arts Degree
Group A Requirements:
Analysis and Appreciation of the Creative Arts and Humanities
9
Group B Requirements:
The Study of Culture and Institutions Over Time
9
Group C Requirements:
Empirically-Based Study of Human Beings and Their Environment
(For CJ majors, Group C requirements are automatically fulfilled by major requirements and required related courses)
9
Group D Requirements:
The Study of Natural Phenomena Through Experiment or Through Analysis
(One of the courses must be a laboratory course)
10 or 11
Writing Requirements:
E 110 (minimum grade of "C-")
3
Second Writing Course
(minimum grade of "C-")
3
Multicultural Requirement:
3
Mathematics Requirement:
3
Foreign Language Requirement:
Completion of the final intermediate level course in a given language or satisfactory performance on a proficiency test administered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.
0 - 12

Major Requirements
Criminal Justice
30
CRJU 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice
3
CRJU 201 Problems of Law Enforcement
3
CRJU 202 Problems of Criminal Judiciary
3
CRJU 203 Problems of Corrections
3
CRJU Electives
(6 courses at 300 or 400 level)
NOTE: Grade of "C-" or better required in all CRJU courses.
18
 
Required Related Courses
19
Sociology
SOCI 201 Introduction to Sociology
3
SOCI 301 Introduction to Social Research
4
NOTE: Grade of "C-" or better required for SOCI 301.  
Political Science
POSC 150 American Political System
3
AND, any 1 of the following:
  • POSC 401 Topics in Constitutional Law}
 
  • POSC 402 Civil Liberties: Individual Freedoms}
 
  • POSC 403 Civil Liberties: Equal Protection}
3
  • POSC 405 Constititional Law of U.S.}
 
 
Psychology
PSYC 100 General Psychology
3
AND, any 1 of the following:
  • PSYC 301 Personality }
 
  • PSYC 303 Introduction to Social Psychology }
3
  • PSYC 325 Child Psychology }
 
  • PSYC 334 Abnormal Psychology }
 
 
Free Electives as needed to reach 124 credits

 

Double Major or Interdepartmental Major

 

DOUBLE MAJOR: With the permission of the dean of the college and both department chairpersons, a student may elect to fulfill requirements for two majors such as Criminal Justice and English (perhaps for a career in journalism), Criminal Justice and Chemistry (perhaps for a career in forensic science), or Criminal Justice and Psychology (perhaps for a career in correctional counseling).

 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR: An interdepartmental major may be selected upon consultation with the department chairpersons concerned. Such a major consists of a minimum of 51 credit hours selected from closely related fields. The student, with the advice of the chairpersons of the departments, prepares a program of study that must be approved by the dean of the student's college. Two fields are represented, each with a minimum of 21 credit hours, the remaining 9 credit hours to be selected from either field or in appropriate subject-matter areas.

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSE OFFERINGS

 

CRJU 110 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

A general introduction to the study of the American system of criminal justice. The crime problem, the police, the judicial system, and correctional agencies will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on depicting both the legal and behavioral realities of each stage of the criminal justice process.

 

CRJU 120 ILLICIT DRUG USE IN AMERICA (3)

An examination of the nature and extent of illicit drug use in the United States and the sociocultural context. Emphasis is placed on the history and effects of the major drugs of abuse and the social issues of the 1950's through the 1990's which contributed to the increased usage of illicit drugs.

 

CRJU 201 PROBLEMS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)

An introduction to a range of historical, political, philosophical, and sociological problems in institutions vested with the responsibility to enforce laws, and/or preserve order.

 

CRJU 202 PROBLEMS OF THE CRIMINAL JUDICIARY (3)

An analysis of judicial decision making with an emphasis on the structure and performance of American trial and appellate courts. In addition to reviewing the basic legal concepts that underlie the criminal courts, students will examine research findings on the behavior of judges, juries, prosecutors, defense attorneys, defendants, and other key actors in the judicial process.

 

CRJU 203 PROBLEMS OF CORRECTIONS (3)

A general overview of the American corrections system and a survey of today's most pressing correctional problems. The philosophy of punishment will be extensively discussed and major emphasis will be placed upon the nature of the prison experience, alternatives to incarceration, judicial intervention in correctional affairs, and the controversy concerning the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

 

LEST/CRJU 301 INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL STUDIES (3)

Introduces legal studies as a multidisciplinary field.

 

SOCI/CRJU 303 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3)

The study of delinquency as a form of socially deviant behavior with an emphasis on theories of causation, the delinquent subculture, prevention, and treatment. Prerequisite: SOCI 201 or 209.

 

SOCI/CRJU 304 CRIMINOLOGY (3)

The nature, kinds, and causes of crimes. Criminal liability, criminal careers, organized racketeering. Prerequisite: SOCI 201 OR 209.

 

CRJU 311 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT AND THE LAW (3)

An overview of the law of capital punishment. Emphasizes the U.S. Supreme Court's major death-penalty decisions and the effects of these decisions. Studying modern death-penalty law will allow students to judge for themselves whether capital punishment is being administered fairly.

 

CRJU 312 HISTORY OF CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Examines changing perceptions of criminal and deviant behavior and the development of laws, institutions, and social policies to counteract crime from the seventeenth century to the present. Cross-listed with HIST 312.

 

CRJU 320 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW (3)

An analysis of the evolution of criminal law within the larger societal context, with an emphasis on substantive criminal law.

 

CRJU 324 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY (3)

A survey of the development of judicial review since Reconstruction, emphasizing the Supreme Court's response to urbanization and industrialization, the growth of executive authority, and the extension of civil rights and civil liberties in the twentieth century. Cross-listed with HIST 324.

 

CRJU 332 CRIMINAL VIOLENCE IN AMERICA (3)

A general overview of various aspects of criminal violence. Class sessions will be devoted to the analysis of child abuse, rape, domestic violence, and homicide.

 

CRJU 335 CRIME AND JUSTICE IN FILM AND LITERATURE (3)

Examines the issues and ideologies found in noteworthy American and international films and writings that emphasize themes of justice, punishment, and social control. Contrasts cinematic and literary depictions of these themes with empirical research on criminality, violence, victimization, and the practices of criminal justice institutions. Cross-listed with BAMS 355 and SOCI 356.

 

CRJU 336 THE DETECTIVE IN FILM AND FICTION (3)

Study of detective fiction and film has applications to a liberal arts approach to crime and justice. Blends literary analysis with the insights of social science research on the work of private and police detectives. Cross-listed with ENGL 330.

 

CRJU 340 THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

An in-depth view of the juvenile justice system in the United States. Crime patterns of youth, police-juvenile relations, juvenile courts, and correctional practices for juveniles are sample topics.

 

SOCI/CRJU 345 SOCIOLOGY OF LAW (3)

The analysis of law as a social process in both historical and comparative perspective. Focus is on various theories of law and society and the empirical research relevant thereto.

 

CRJU 346 PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LAW (3)

A seminar course in which students explore the rapidly expanding field of psychology and the law. Students will review and discuss psychological research on such topics as the adversary system, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, the insanity defense, perceptions of crime, and the death penalty. Cross-listed with PSYC 346.

 

CRJU 350 GENDER AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

This course reviews historical and contemporary explanations for women's participation in crime and evaluates these explanations in light of current research. Other topics include treatment of women offenders by the judicial and correctional systems, women as victims of crime, and women as criminal justice personnel. Cross-listed with WOMS 350.

 

CRJU 351 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

Study of different criminal justice systems across the world including discussions of their approaches to law, policing, courts, and corrections, common law, civil law, Islamic traditions as well as others.

 

CRJU 352 INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Introduction to basic structures of the international criminal justice system including international and transnational crime, international courts, transnational policing, and international criminal law.

 

CRJU 355 INEQUALITY, CRIME AND JUSTICE (3)

Introduction to challenges in addressing crime in a multiracial, multiethnic, class-stratified society. This context serves as the backdrop for inquiry into crime causation, the operations of the criminal justice system, and the experiences of relevant actors.

 

CRJU 357 SEMINAR ON POLICE (3)

This course explores the functions of the police in modern society, and how those functions have evolved and continue to evolve in light of political, economic, and technological developments. Emphasis is placed on analysis of contemporary research studies as well as classical analyses of police behavior.

 

CRJU 369 ALCOHOL, DRUGS AND CRIME (3)

Examines the relationship between alcohol, drugs and crime, including societal response to offenders who commit alcohol/drug related offenses and offenders who engage in crime over drug markets.

 

CRJU 375 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (3)

An examination of the legal procedures followed in criminal cases with an emphasis on search and seizure, self-incrimination, double jeopardy, line-ups, right to counsel, right to confrontation, and protection against cruel and unusual punishments.

 

CRJU 413 HATE CRIMES (3)

Hate crime is new to the legal vernacular. In recent years, hate crimes have become problems of law and justice that have received increased political, academic, and public attention. Explores the causes and constitutional issues revolving around hate crime and resulting laws.

 

CRJU 420 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

Students explore the complexities, conflicts, ambiguities and multiple values that must be managed in the criminal justice system. Basic administrative principles, organizational theories, budgetary matters, and the role of the computer in criminal justice are sample topics.

 

CRJU 425 CRIMINAL LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY (3)

Explores the increasingly important role of the American judiciary in making public policy and resolving competing societal and individual concerns. The course seeks to examine the manner in which the courts have adjudicated some of today's most controversial social issues, including capital punishment, abortion, and pornography. The course also demonstrates how criminal law affects the rights and aspirations of racial and ethnic minorities, the poor, juveniles, prisoners, women, and others.

 

SOCI/CRJU 428 CORPORATE CRIME (3)

A study of the crimes of corporations. Among the topics are how corporations act, are accused of crimes, and defend themselves in cases such as price-fixing, sale of unsafe drugs, and illegal spying.

 

CRJU 435 PUNISHING SPEECH (3)

Examines the use of the criminal law and other regulatory sanctions to punish certain types of speech and the efforts of courts to determine which speech is deserving of constitutional protection and therefore beyond governmental control.

 

CRJU 437 SEMINAR ON CORRECTIONS (3)

An in-depth examination of central topics in corrections including philosophy of punishment, history of punishment, structure and change of correctional settings and programs, and prison reform.

 

CRJU 444 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT AND AMERICAN CULTURE (3)

Over time, American values about crime, law, and order have come to shape politics and therefore the penalty of death. Explores the death penalty in the public consciousness and in practice.

 

SOCI/CRJU 448 COMMUNITY-BASED TREATMENT (3)

Explores issues related to the appropriateness and design of community-based programs for the mentally disabled, substance abusers, the homeless, dependent children, etc. Emphasis is given to analyzing client needs and community resources, and to understanding the perspectives of clients, staff and neighbors about these programs.

 

CRJU 450 PRISONERS AND THE LAW (3)

An examination of the legal rights available to prisoners seeking to challenge their convictions or their conditions of confinement. Emphasis on analyzing the capacity of courts to spur prison reform and the impact of court decisions on American penal practices.

 

CRJU 452 DRUGS & THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

Provides an opportunity for a small group of students from the University of Delaware and a group of residents from the Crest Work Release Center to gain a deeper understanding of drugs and the criminal justice system through the marriage of theoretical knowledge and practical experience. Topics include the drugs-crime nexus, race, and gender issues, victimization, policy in other countries, and new policy responses in the U.S., including drug treatment, harm reduction, and restorative justice.

 

SOCI/CRJU 456 LAWYERS AND SOCIETY (3)

A seminar focusing upon the social organization and dynamics of the legal profession. Topics include professional association, law school socialization, professional ethics, and law practice. Requires permission of the instructor.

 

CRJU 457 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE (3)

An examination of the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in criminal proceedings. Students will analyze federal and state court decisions on the scope of the Fourth Amendment, the Fifth Amendment, the exclusionary rule, and statutory rules of evidence.

 

CRJU 460 CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY (3)

A critical examination of criminal justice policy in the United States over the past thirty years, with emphasis on the two major theoretical positions that have dominated criminal justice policy making during that period. Specific policies and practices will be examined, with an emphasis on determining which policies are successful and what potential alternatives exist to unsuccessful policies.

 

CRJU 480 CIVIL LIABILITY IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Examines the circumstances under which the law provides remedies for individuals harmed by agents of the government. May also include discussion of the use of civil remedies, such as asset forfeiture, to complement criminal prosecutions.

 

CRJU 489 CRIME VICTIMS AND VICTIM'S RIGHTS (3)

This course examines victim-offender relationships, the interactions between victims and the criminal justice system, and the connections between victims and other social groups and institutions (such as the media, social movements, advocacy groups, legislatures, and the state). Additionally, it explores victim rights and compensation, fear of crime, measurement of victimization, and the impact of victimization on the individual.

 

CRJU 495 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4)

A practicum during which students will be given actual field experience working in a criminal justice agency. Special emphasis will be placed on relating the field experience to academic work. Restricted to junior and senior criminal justice majors. Requires permission of instructor. Course is graded on a pass/fail basis and counts as a free elective.
Field Experience Information)

 

CAREERS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

 

Criminal Justice is a career-oriented liberal arts major focusing upon the inter- relationship among crime, the criminal justice system, and society as a whole. As such, there are many potential career opportunities for a student studying criminal justice. The following list represents some of these opportunities:

    Municipal, county or state police officer
    Federal law enforcement officer
    Court administrator
    Juvenile court counselor
    Correctional counselor
    Correctional administrator
    Probation officer
    Preprofessional training
    • Law
    • Public Administration
    • Social Sciences
    Presentence investigator
    Private security officer or investigator
    Parole officer
    Social Worker
    Juvenile after-care worker
    Criminal Justice educator or researcher
    Criminal Justice planner or evaluator
    Paralegal
    Victim assistance counselor

 

 

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AS A PRE-LAW MAJOR

 

 

Over the past two decades, over 500 graduates of the University's Criminal Justice Program have gone on to law school and are now pursuing careers in law. However, it should be noted that law school admissions officials do not give any special advantage to applicants who have pursued undergraduate majors in such law-related disciplines as criminal justice or political science. Law school officials prefer to select students representing a diversity of undergraduate majors, ranging from criminal justice, philosophy, history, psychology, and English to chemistry, engineering, math, business, and economics. Indeed, a student's undergraduate major is not a particularly important criterion affecting law school admissions decisions. What is far more important is that, regardless of major, the prospective law student will have pursued a rigorous curriculum that requires superior skills in writing, reading comprehension, and analytical ability. The Criminal Justice Program is designed to do just that.

 


INFORMATION AND ADVISEMENT ABOUT THE PROGRAM

 

 

Students seeking more information about the criminal justice degree program may contact Dr. Eric Rise, Associate Chairperson for the Criminal Justice Program, 325 Smith Hall (302-831-1236). Information about the Criminal Justice Program is also available online at <www.udel.edu/soc>.


 

GRADUATE STUDY IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

 

Within the Department of Sociology, a Ph.D. in Criminology and a Master of Arts in Criminology are now being offered. These degree programs provide intensive study in the areas of crime and criminal justice, combined with the theoretical and methodological background in sociology appropriate for research and critical analysis of criminal justice operations.

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE FACULTY

 

 

Eric Rise, J.D., Ph.D. in History
( Univ. of Florida ),
Associate Chairperson
and Associate Professor

 

Tammy L. Anderson, Ph.D. in Sociology/Justice
( American Univ. )
Associate Professor

Ronet Bachman, Ph.D. in Sociology
( Univ. of New Hampshire )
Professor and Chairperson

 

Aaron Fichtelberg, Ph.D. in Philosophy
( Emory Univ. ), LL.M. ( Utrecht Univ. )
Assistant Professor

 

Benjamin Fleury-Steiner, Ph.D. in Sociology
( Northeastern Univ. )
Associate Professor

 

Kenneth C. Haas, Ph.D. in Political Science
( Rutgers Univ. )
Professor

 

Lana D. Harrison, Ph.D. in Sociology
( Univ. of Michigan )
Professor

 

James A. Inciardi, Ph.D. in Sociology
( New York Univ. )
Professor

 

Emma Jean Joseph, J.D.
( Widener University School of Law )
Assistant Professor

Aaron Kupchik, Ph.D. in Sociology
(New York University)
Assistant Professor

Chrysanthi Leon, Ph.D.
( University of California - Berkeley )
Assistant Professor

 

Susan L. Miller, Ph.D. in Criminology,
( University of Maryland )
Professor



Karen F. Parker, Ph.D. in Sociology,
(North Carolina State University)
Professor

Cynthia Robbins, Ph.D. in Sociology
( Univ. of Michigan )
Professor

 

Ivan Sun, Ph.D. in Criminal Justice
( Suny-Albany )
Associate Professor

 

PART-TIME FACULTY

 

 

David B. Gulick, Ph.D. in Criminal Justice
( Sam Houston State Univ. )
Assistant Professor

 

John F. Jebb, Ph.D. in English
( University of Delaware )

 

Charles M. Oberly, III, J.D.
( Univ. of Virginia School of Law )

 

Daniel J. O'Connell, Ph.D. in Criminology
(University of Delaware)
Associate Scientist, Center for Drug & Alcohol Studies

John Polk, J.D.
( Widener University School of Law )

 

Robert Rush, Ph.D. in Criminology
( Univ. of Delaware )

 

 

Sociology | Contact us | Address 322 Smith Hall, Newark, DE 19716 | 302-831-2581 phone | 302-831-2607 fax
Criminal Justice| Contact us | Address 325 Smith Hall, Newark, DE 19716 | 302-831-1236 phone | 302-831-0688 fax