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Wednesday March 5, 2014. 5:30pm. Reception follows talk Memorial Hall 111

The Department of Philosophy in partnership with the Department of Art History proudly presents...

Can the Art of Living Be Taught?


Prof. Alexander Nehamas

Edmund N. Carpenter II Class of 1943 Professor in the Humanities,
Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Literature - Princeton University

Alexander Nehamas
ALEXANDER NEHAMAS has been teaching philosophy and comparative literature at Princeton since 1990. He works on Greek philosophy, aesthetics, Nietzsche, Foucault, and literary theory.  He received the 2001 Mellon Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities Award and the 2000 Academy of Athens Award for Distinguished Achievement in Hellenic Studies.  His most recent book, Only a Promise of Happiness:  The Place of Beauty in a World of Art, won Best Professional/Scholarly Book in Philosophy, Association of American Publishers award in 2007. He also served as President for the American Philosophical Association in 2003-2004.

This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, the American Philosophical Association, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Thursday November 29, 2012. 3:30pm. Reception follows talk Gore 103

Ethics as a Human Project


Prof. Philip Kitcher

John Dewey Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University

Philip Kitcher
Professor Kitcher (Ph.D. Princeton, 1974) has taught at Vassar, Vermont, Michigan, Minnesota, UC San Diego and Columbia, where he is currently the John Dewey Professor of Philosophy. He has published numerous articles and 12 books, most recently SCIENCE IN A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY and THE ETHICAL PROJECT. He has received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, been President of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, was Phi Beta Kappa Romanell Professor, and has been awarded the Humboldt Prize.

This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Thursday March 15, 2012. Refreshments 6:45pm / lecture 7:30pm Clayton Hall, #120/125

The Philosophical Significance of the Human Ability to Plan


Prof. Michael Bratman

U. G. and Abbie Birch Durfee Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University

Ronald Dworkin
Professor Bratman has been at Stanford University since 1974. He earned a BA from Haverford College in 1967 and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Rockefeller University in 1974. His major book publications are Intention, Plans, and Practical Reason (1987), Faces of Intention: Selected Essays on Intention and Agency (1999), and Structures of Agency: Essays (2007). He is also a co-editor of Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. He has been awarded an ACLS Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and the Stanford University Humanities Center.

This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Friday Nov 4, 2011. 3:30pm Kirkbride Hall, Rm. 004

Religion Without God


Prof. Ronald Dworkin

Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law, New York University School of Law

Ronald Dworkin
Dworkin is among the world's most influential scholars of law and moral philosophy. He has published numerous papers and books including Taking Rghts Seriously (1977), Law's Empire (1986), Freedom's Law: The Moral Reading of the American Constitution (1997), Sovereign Virtue: The Theory and Practice of Equality (2000), Justice in Robes (2007), and Truth for Hedgehogs (forthcoming).

This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, Legal Studies, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Friday April 8, 2011.  

Margaret P. Gilbert

Abraham I. Melden Chair in Moral Philosophy
University of California - Irvine


"Dark Duties": Does "I was ordered to do it" excuse a bad action?

margaret gilbert

Dr. Gilbert received her Ph.D. from Oxford. She has published widely in philosophy of social science, ethics, and political philosophy.


This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Saturday November 7, 2009.  

Larry Temkin


Professor of Philosophy
Rutgers University

Larry Temkin

Rethinking the Good: Moral Ideals and the Nature of Practical Reasoning

Dr. Temkin received his Ph.D. from Princeton and authored the book Inequality. He specializes in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy.

The lecture is preceded by the
University of Delaware Undergraduate Philosophy Conference,
which begins at 10:00 AM in the Rodney Room.

This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Department of Philosophy, and the Makaguchi Foundation.


Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Sunday March 1, 2009.  

Samuel Freeman


Avalon Professor in the Humanities
University of Pennsylvania

Sam
Social Bases of Distributive Justice

Samuel Freeman is a social and political philosopher and Professor of Philosophy and Law at U Penn. He is renowned for his work on the political philosophy of John Rawls.


This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, the Department of Philosophy, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Delaware Interdisciplinary Ethics Program, and the Makaguchi Foundation.
Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

September 23, 2007.  

Holmes Rolston III


University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy
Colorado State University

Rolston
The Future of Environmental Ethics

Holmes Rolston's paper, 'Is there an Ecological Ethic?' has been credited with launching environmental ethics as an academic discipline when it was published in Ethics in 1975. Since then, Rolston has continued to lead the field he helped to establish, with numerous books, papers, invited lectureships, and other speaking engagements, in addition to his duties as University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Colorado State University. The many awards recognizing Rolston's contribution to environmental ethics include the Templeton Prize (2003) and the Mendel Medal (2005).


This lecture is supported by the David Norton Memorial Fund honoring the late UD Philosophy professor, the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, the Department of Philosophy, the Class of 1955 Ethics Endowment Fund, the Delaware Interdisciplinary Ethics Program, and the Makaguchi Foundation.
Please confirm by email or phone - 302-831-2359

 

Spring, 2006  

Elliott Sober


Hans Reichenbach Professor and William F. Vilas Research Professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 
What’s Wrong with Intelligent Design Theory?

Intelligent Design Theory claims that recently discovered adaptive features of organisms are
strong evidence for the existence of an intelligent designer. Even though ID theorists discuss new examples (for example, the biochemistry of blood coagulation) and do not explicitly mention God, the logic of their argument is the same as the logic of the Design Argument, which is a traditional argument for the existence of God. In this talk I’ll present what I think is the strongest version of the Argument from Design and then describe what I think the argument’s fatal flaw is.

Elliott Sober is internationally recognized as a leading philosopher of biology and philosopher of science. Sober has published the following important books in these fields: SIMPLICITY; THE NATURE OF SELECTION; RECONSTRUCTING THE PAST; PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY; FROM A BIOLOGICAL POINT OF VIEW; UNTO OTHERS; and ADAPTATIONISM AND OPTIMALITY. In addition, Sober has published the anthologies CONCEPTUAL ISSUES IN EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY; RECONSTRUCTING MARXISM; and over 200 scholarly articles and book chapters, along with his very popular textbook CORE QUESTIONS IN PHILOSOPHY.

Sober has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has held grants from NEH, NSF, ACLS, The National Research Council, and has received many other honors and awards. In addition to teaching at Wisconsin, he has held visiting appointments at Harvard, Stanford, Michigan, the London School of Economics, the University Vienna, and the University of Otago, New Zealand.


Fall 2005.  

Daniel Dennett


Austin B Fletcher Professor of Philosophy
Tufts University

Darwin, Meaning, Truth & Morality

Some of the most important contributions to philosophy in the last few centuries have come from non-philosophers. Darwin's contributions, for instance, are truly fundamental: his great idea provides new foundations for the theory of meaning, and thereby indirectly secures a better understanding of fundamental concepts in ethics and epistemology.

Daniel C. Dennett, the author of Freedom Evolves (Viking Penguin, 2003) and Darwin's Dangerous Idea (Simon & Schuster, 1995), is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He lives with his wife in North Andover, Massachusetts, and has a daughter, a son, and a grandson. He was born in Boston in 1942, the son of a historian by the same name, and received his B.A. in philosophy from Harvard in 1963. He then went to Oxford to work with Gilbert Ryle, under whose supervision he completed the D.Phil. in philosophy in 1965. He taught at U.C. Irvine from 1965 to 1971, when he moved to Tufts, where he has taught ever since, aside from periods visiting at Harvard, Pittsburgh, Oxford, and the Ecole Normal Superieure in Paris.

His first book, Content and Consciousness, appeared in 1969, followed by Brainstorms (1978), Elbow Room (1984), The Intentional Stance (1987), Consciousness Explained (1991), Darwin's Dangerous Idea (1995), Kinds of Minds (1996), and Brainchildren: A Collection of Essays 1984-1996 (MIT Press and Penguin, 1998). He co-edited The Mind's I with Douglas Hofstadter in 1981. He is the author of over two hundred scholarly articles on various aspects on the mind, published in journals ranging from Artificial Intelligence and Behavioral and Brain Sciences to Poetics Today and the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.

He gave the John Locke Lectures at Oxford in 1983, the Gavin David Young Lectures at Adelaide, Australia, in 1985, and the Tanner Lecture at Michigan in 1986, among many others. He has received two Guggenheim Fellowships, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioral Science. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1987.

 

Spring, 2005  
Nell Noddings Lee L Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita: Stanford University.
Public Schools in Peril: A Threat to Democracy?

The current movement for standards and accountability may be designed to discredit the public schools and pave the way for privatization of education. Is privatization a threat to our democracy?

Nel Noddings is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of the John Dewey Society. In addition to thirteen books, she is the author of some 200 articles and chapters on various topics ranging from the ethics of care to mathematical problem solving. Her latest books are Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy (University of California Press), Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education (Teachers College Press), and Happiness and Education (Cambridge University Press), 2003.


Fall, 2004  
Richard Rorty Professor of Comparitive Literature & Philosophy: Stanford University
The Priority of Imagination over Reason
Richard M. Rorty is among the most prominent contemporary philosophers. Currently Professor of Comparative Literature at Stanford University, he has also taught at Yale, Wellesley, Princeton and University of Virginia. His numerous honors include fellowship awards from the Guggenheim and MacArthur foundations.

Spring, 2003  
John Perry Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy: Stanford University
Is there Hope for Compatibilism?
John Perry is co-founded Stanford's Center For the Study of Language and Information, and has served as its director and as chair of the Department of Philosophy.  He is author of nine books, including most recently Reference and Reflexivity. Stanford: CSLI publications, 2001, and Identity, Personal Identity and the Self. Cambridge/ Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 2002.

Fall, 2001  
Glenn McGee University of Pennsylvania, Center for Bioethics
What's in the Dish? Stem Cells and the New Ethics of Human Development.
 

Spring, 2001  
Louise M Antony Ohio State University
Natures, Norms and the Foundations of Liberalism.
 

Spring, 2000  
Theodore Glasser Stanford University
Accountability in Journalism: What's Missing, What's Needed.
 

Spring, 1999  
Paul Churchland UC San Diego
How the Brain Embodies Moral Knowledge: New Insights from Neural Network Theory.
 

Spring, 1998  
Mark Sagoff University of Maryland
Is the Environmental Crisis Over
 

Spring, 1997  
Michael Krausz Bryn Mawr College
Chosing What One is Cut Out To Be: Reflections on David Norton.