Faculty Scholars

Anderson Margaret
Margaret Andersen
Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor of Sociology
Sociology and Criminal Justice

Margaret L. Andersen is the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor of Sociology at the University of Delaware where she also holds joint appointments in Women's Studies and Black American Studies and where she currently serves as Executive Director of the President's Diversity Initiative. She is the author of several books, including Sociology: The Essentials (with Howard F. Taylor); On Land and On Sea: A Century of Women in the Rosenfeld Collection; Living Art: The Life of Paul R. Jones, African American Art Collector; Race and Ethnicity in Society: The Changing Landscape (with Elizabeth Higginbotham); Thinking about Women: Sociological Perspectives on Sex and Gender; Race, Class and Gender (with Patricia Hill Collins), She is a recipient of the American Sociological Association's Jessie Bernard Award and has received the Sociologists for Women in Society's Feminist Lecturer Award. She is the former Vice President of the American Sociological Association, former president of the Eastern Sociological Society and a recipient of the University of Delaware’s Excellence in Teaching Award.

Erica Armstrong Dunbar
Erica Armstrong-Dunbar
Associate Professor
History

Erica Armstrong Dunbar is an Associate Professor of Black American Studies and History with a joint appointment in Women's Studies. She received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania and her MA and Ph.D. From Columbia University. Her first book, A Fragile Freedom: African American Women and Emancipation in the Antebellum City (Yale University Press 2008) has positioned her as a scholar of early African American Women's history. She has recently participated in several documentaries such as "Philadelphia the Great Experiment" and an upcoming documentary entitled "Abolition" scheduled to appear as a part of the "American Experience" series on PBS. In 2011, Professor Armstrong Dunbar was appointed the first director of the Program in African American History at the Library Company of Philadelphia. She has been the recipient of Ford, Mellon, and SSRC fellowships and most recently has been named an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer. Professor Dunbar's newest book project is entitled, “Never Caught: the Life of Ona Judge Staines." Professor Armstrong Dunbar is interested in exploring new 21st century models of faculty diversity across the nation's colleges and universities.

Aviles-Jose-11
José Aviles
Director of Admissions

Booksh,Carl-01
Karl Booksh
Professor
Chemistry
Julio Carrion
Julio Carrión
Associate Professor
Political Science and International Relations

Julio Carrión (Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Political science) is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations, and Director of the Center for Global and Area Studies (CGAS). Carrión joined the University of Delaware in the fall of 1998, and has been Director of the Latin American and Iberian Studies program, Director of the Area Studies Programs, and acting chair of the Department of Political Science and International Relations. His field of specialization is public opinion and political behavior in Latin America. He is the author of The Working-Class Youth in Peru (IEP, Peru, 1991). He edited The Fujimori Legacy: The Rise of Electoral Authoritarianism in Peru (University Park: Penn State University Press, 2006). His most recent publications include "The Andes in the New Millennium: Actors and Institutions in a Changing Environment." Latin American Politics and Society (Winter 2012); Cultura Política de la Democracia en el Perú, 2010: Consolidación democrática en las Américas en tiempos difíciles. Lima: Vanderbilt University-Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, 2009 (co-authored with Patricia Zárate).

Pam Cook
Pamela Cook
Professor of Mathematics
Mathematical Sciences

L. Pamela Cook (-Ioannidis) (PhD, Cornell University) is Professor of Mathematics, Associate Dean of Engineering, and affiliated faculty in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware. Her research interests are in fluid flow, particularly complex fluids such as those used in shampoos and in enhancing oil recovery. She is Vice President for Publications for S.I.A.M. (the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics), an inaugural Fellow of S.I.A.M, she chaired the Department of Mathematics at the University of Delaware for nine years, and she chaired the Commission on the Status of Women at UD for six years. She is particularly interested in improving the recruitment and retention of women in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) especially at the faculty and graduate student level. As a co-PI on the UD NSF ADVANCE P.A.I.D. (Partnerships for Adaptations, Implementation, and Dissemination ) grant she has worked with UD faculty to read and understand best practices in recruitment of faculty, best practices in retention of faculty, and unconscious bias, then to develop and present two workshops, offered "by STEM faculty for STEM faculty" , one on "Best Practices in "Faculty Recruitment" the other on "Mentoring the Mentors.” Dr. Cook received the WEPAN (Women Engineers ProActive Network) University Change Agent Award.

DeLeon_Patricia-05
Patricia DeLeon
Trustees Distinguished Professor
Biology

Patricia A. DeLeon is Trustees Distinguished Professor in Biological Sciences where her research focuses on reproductive genetics, specifically genes involved in sperm development and function (funded by the NIH and the NSF). With an interest in diversity in the STEM field, she mentors graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and undergraduates with senior theses. She served as a member of the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (1992-1996), NIH Study Sections, an NSF Review Panelist, and on the Executive Council of the American Society of Andrology (ASA) where she was recognized for her scientific contributions to Andrology in 2006. Recently, she completed a term as President of Women in Andrology and currently serves as a member of ASA Diversity Committee. Also at UD, she has chaired the Women’s Studies Faculty Research Awards Committee and WISE (Women in Science and Engineering). Nationally known for her efforts in mentoring women and minorities, she is a 2007 recipient of the U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM).

Chad Forbes
Chad Forbes
Assistant Professor
Psychology

Chad Forbes (Ph.D., University of Arizona) is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Delaware. With a background spanning from molecular biology to complex social processes, Dr. Forbes utilizes behavioral methodologies as well as electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), lesion studies and genetic approaches to investigate social phenomena. Specifically, he examines how priming negative stereotypes affects our perceptions as well as stigmatized individuals in our society, e.g. minorities and women, to ironically engender situations that inadvertently reinforce the stereotype. Dr. Forbes is currently developing a model that outlines how and why minorities and women are more likely to leave academics and STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) fields respectively, as well as how these phenomena can be reversed. He has numerous publications on these topics in a wide array of journals, including Annual Reviews of Neuroscience, Cerebral Cortex and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Gabrielle Foreman
Gabrielle Foreman
Ned Allen Professor
English

As an award-winning teacher, scholar, advisor and activist, Dr. P. Gabrielle Foreman is committed to her students’ development and to the fields of African American studies and nineteenth-century literary history and culture. At University of Delaware, she is professor of Black American Studies, an associate with the Center for the Study of Diversity and the Ned B. Allen Professor of English.

Community engagement is one of Foreman’s central commitments. She was named a Kellogg National Leadership Fellow for her work with youth. With young activists and partners from the non-profit sector she co-founded Action for Social Change and Youth Empowerment. AScHAYE put young activists on boards of directors and provided training to help build cohesive groups of youth leaders of color working across issue areas, race, and the geographical divide of Southern California. Her work with community-based organizations on the issue of sustainable community/academic partnerships continues.

Sam Gaertner
Sam Gaertner
Professor
Psychology

Sam Gaertner (PhD, The City University of New York: Graduate Center) is Professor of Psychology at the University of Delaware. His research interests involve intergroup relations with a focus on understanding and reducing prejudice, discrimination and racism. He has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and Group Processes and Intergroup Relations. Currently, Professor Gaertner is co-editor (with Rupert Brown, Sussex University, UK), of Social Issues and Policy Review, a journal of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Professor Gaertner's research has been supported by grants from the Office of Naval Research, the National Institutes of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation.

Gaiter,Colette-04
Colette Gaiter
Associate Professor
Department of Art

University of Delaware Associate Professor of Art Colette Gaiter is a multimedia artist and writer. Her work has been shown at the Contemporary Arts Museum of Houston, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, and in numerous galleries, museums and public institutions in the U.S. and around the world.

She writes about artists and activism. Her writing on the Black Panther artist Emory Douglas appears in several publications including the 2007 Rizzoli monograph Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas. She is currently making a documentary about his work.

Cuban art and artists and U.S. Latino artist activism are other subjects of her recent research and writing.

Elizabeth Higginbotham
Elizabeth Higginbotham
Professor
Sociology and Criminal Justice

Elizabeth Higginbotham (Ph.D. )is a professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware with joint appointments in Black American Studies and Women's Studies. She has a long standing interest in diversity issues as they related to education and employment. Her publications include, Too Much to Ask: Black Women in the Era of Integration (University of North Carolina Press, 2001), and with Margaret Andersen, Race in Society: Then Changing Landscape (Wadsworth-Cengage, 2012) in its third edition. She is currently researching Black professionals who desegregate workplaces.

Kerschbaum_Stephanie06
Stephanie Kerschbaum
Assistant Professor
English

Stephanie L. Kerschbaum (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) is an Assistant Professor of English focusing on rhetoric and writing studies. Her research examines rhetorics of diversity in higher education and how people negotiate differences in classroom settings. She is currently working on a book that examines a first-year writing classroom for how students orient to differences between themselves and their classmates during writing workshops. Her publications have appeared in College Composition and Communication and in the edited volume Narrative Discourse Analysis for Teacher Educators: Managing Cultural Difference in Classrooms (Hampton, 2011).

Muqtedar Khan
Muqtedar Khan
Associate Professor
Political Science and International Relations

Dr. Muqtedar Khan is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Delaware. He earned his Ph.D. in International Relations, Political Philosophy, and Islamic Political Thought, from Georgetown University in May 2000. He founded the Islamic Studies Program at the University of Delaware and was its first Director from 2007-2010.

Dr. Khan is a Fellow with the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. He was a Senior Nonresident Fellow with the Brookings Institution [2003-2008] and a Fellow of the Alwaleed Center at Georgetown University [2006-2007]. He has been the President, Vice President and General Secretary of the Association of Muslim Social Scientists. He is the author of American Muslims: Bridging Faith and Freedom (Amana, 2002), Jihad for Jerusalem: Identity and Strategy in International Relations (Praeger, 2004), Islamic Democratic Discourse (Lexington Books, 2006) and Debating Moderate Islam: The Geopolitics of Islam and the West (University of Utah Press, 2007).

JP Laurenceau
JP Laurenceau
Associate Professor
Psychology

Jean-Philippe Laurenceau (Ph.D., Penn State University) is Professor of Psychology at the University of Delaware. He has sought to support and enhance diversity at the University through his past service as member of the UD Diversity Task Force, Diversity Action Council, Diversity & Equity Commission, and as chair of the Latino/Hispanic Heritage Caucus. He is currently a faculty scholar of UD's Center for the Study of Diversity and is on the faculty advisory committee of the President's Diversity Initiative. Prof. Laurenceau is an appointed member of the Social, Personality, and Interpersonal Processes grant review panel of the National Institutes of Health. His research focuses on understanding the processes by which partners in marital and romantic relationships develop and maintain intimacy in the context of everyday life. His methodological interests include intensive longitudinal methods for studying behavioral and social processes and applications of modern methods for the analysis of change in individuals and dyads.

Lynette Overby
Lynnette Overby
Professor
Theatre

Lynnette Young Overby (Ph.D., University of Maryland) is Professor of Theatre. She has served as Equity Administrator for the University of Maryland College of Health and Human Development where she spearheaded efforts to recruit and retain minority students and faculty. Before coming to the University of Delaware, she served as the College of Arts and Letters Associate Dean of Outreach, Engagement and Inclusivity at Michigan State University. Currently, she serves as Faculty Director of Undergraduate Research and Experiential Learning and a Professor of Theatre and Dance. Her publications have appeared in The Journal of Mental Imagery, The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance, Cognition, Imagination and Personality, and the Journal of Dance Medicine and Science. With co-authors, Beth Post and Diane Newman, Overby published the book, Interdisciplinary Learning through Dance: 101 Moventures. She serves as co-editor of seven volumes of Dance: Current Selected Research.

Payne,Yasser11
Yasser Payne
Associate Professor
Black American Studies

Yasser A. Payne is an associate professor in the Department of Black American Studies at the University of Delaware. His street ethnographic research program is centered on exploring notions of resiliency with the streets of Black America using an unconventional methodological framework entitled Participatory Action Research--the process of involving members of the population of interest on the actual research team.

His approach to diversity is centered on exploring or examining the variation of psychological identity as it relates to Black and Brown populations involved with the criminal justice system. In most instances, such populations are framed in a monolithic way and Dr. Payne through his research has found great emotional, psychological and developmental variation. Also, he aims to break down or through stereotypical barriers and images of Black and Brown people in the criminal justice system, so that transition back in the community and opportunities for upward mobility are successful. Dr. Payne’s work is centered on humanizing those in the criminal justice system and getting undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and/or everday residents to work more closely with those in the criminal justice system.

Rosalie Rolon Dow
Rosalie Rolón Dow
Associate Professor
School of Education

Rosalie Rolón Dow (Ph.D., Temple University) is an Associate Professor in the School of Education at the University of Delaware. An ethnographer of education, she studies how race, ethnicity, gender and social class dynamics shape opportunities and produce educational (in)equity, particularly for Latino/a youth. She has partnered with local teachers to provide reciprocal learning relationships and research opportunities between university and middle school students that have involved classroom exchanges and digital storytelling projects exploring race, immigration and education. She is currently working on a book on the intersection of diaspora processes with the educational experiences of Puerto Rican youth. She teaches and advises students in the Sociocultural Approaches to Education Ph.D. specialization, the Urban Education minor and the Elementary Teacher Education program.

Leland Ware
Leland Ware
Louis L. Redding Chair for the Study of Law and Public Policy
School of Public Policy and Administration

Professor Leland Ware has been the Louis L. Redding Chair for the Study of Law and Public Policy at the University of Delaware since 2000. Before his present appointment, he was a professor at St. Louis University School of Law from 1987 to 2000. He was a visiting professor at Boston College Law School in 1992 and at the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, in 1997. Professor Ware was University Counsel at Howard University from 1984 to 1987. For the five years prior to his position at Howard, he was a Trial Attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, in Washington, D.C. He had previously practiced with a private firm in Atlanta, Georgia, and with the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Professor Ware's research focuses on various aspects of Civil Rights law. He has authored more than 100 publications consisting of academic journal articles, book chapters, essays, book reviews, editorials and other publications in academic journals and other publications. Professor Ware has organized a number of academic symposia, professional programs and hosted many distinguished lectures. Professor Ware is a co-author, with Robert Cottrol and Raymond Diamond, of Brown v. Board of Education: Caste, Culture and the Constitution (2003). He is the editor of Choosing Equality: Essays and Narratives on the Desegregation Experience (co-edited with Robert L. Hayman with a Foreword by Vice President Joe Biden) Penn State Press (2009). He has lectured and made other presentations to numerous audiences in the United States and Europe. Professor Ware is a graduate of Fisk University and Boston College Law School.

David Wislon
David Wilson
Associate Professor
Political Science and International Relations

David C. Wilson (PhD, Michigan State University) is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Delaware. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Black American Studies, and Psychology, and teaches courses on statistics and data analysis, research methods, public opinion, race and politics, and political psychology. He is a national expert in the field of public opinion and political behavior, and his research interests focus on measurement in public opinion polls, social influence and survey response, and how issues, individuals, and policies become racialized through political communication. His work has appeared in outlets such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Public Opinion Quarterly, the Du Bois Review, and the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He is currently analyzing experimental data on group based resentments, and racialized belief systems.