PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES & MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS CAREER RESOURCES

PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES & MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS CAREER RESOURCES  

 

The Career Center embraces the university’s commitment to diversity and inclusive excellence and is dedicated to ensuring all students’ experiences, perspectives and backgrounds are respected, recognized, and integrated into career planning and development. Included in our charge, we strive to prepare diverse and historically underserved and underrepresented populations for career success. This work is essential for educating global citizens, developing knowledge, and advancing and enhancing our world.

Career Services offers individual counseling, job and internship resources, networking events, and professional development opportunities to help students of all races and backgrounds succeed.

Below are resources to help direct students along their career path. These resources offer a starting point in learning about issues managed by differently abled students and professionals in the workplace and those looking to begin an internship or job search.

There are no right answers or wrong questions, each student’s job, internship, or graduate school search is unique. The career development process is individual and unique. Our career counselors are here to support you!

Find additional resources and information here: UD Disability Support Services 

Career Counselor

Laura Gibison

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Career Counselor

Nichole Fessenden

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RESOURCES

 

 

Find additional resources and information here: UD Disability Support Services

DISCLOSING YOUR DISABILITY AND/OR MENTAL HEALTH CONDITION

WHAT IS DISCLOSURE?

Disclosure is the process of informing a potential employer that you have a disability.  

 

DO I HAVE TO TELL POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS ABOUT MY DISABILITY?

You are not required to tell potential employers about your disability, and they cannot ask you about your condition. Disclosure is a personal choice dependent upon type of disability, how the disability will affect your work and your personal feelings. Explaining your disability and how it will affect your work is recommended, as most potential employers feel positively towards those applicants whom they feel have been completely honest. Disclosing your disability also protects you under the Americans with Disabilities Act. These protections include all aspects of employment such as the application process, hiring, wages, benefits, workstations and/or equipment.

 

WHEN SHOULD I DISCLOSE MY DISABILITY?

There are several appropriate times to disclose your disability to a potential employer. You should decide when you would feel the most comfortable making this disclosure.

  • Resume - If you have had work experience (paid or volunteer) that is related to your disability, be sure to include it on your resume.
  • Cover Letter - Disclosing in a cover letter is appropriate. If you choose to disclose in your cover letter, you may want to staple the letter to the back of your resume so that the employer reads about your abilities before learning the specifics about your disability. Be aware that disclosing in a cover letter may lessen your chances of being granted an interview in some cases.
  • Interview Confirmation - Many people choose to disclose at this point. It would be very difficult for the employer to back out of the interview at this late time. Employers tend to react more favorably to this type of disclosure. When you call to confirm your interview, be sure to talk directly to the person who will be interviewing you.
  • Job Commencement – Despite ADA protections, some people are still hesitant to disclose their disability until they have been hired. If you choose to wait until you’ve accepted the position, make sure to follow the best practices below. 

 

PRESENT YOUR DISABILITY BY INDICATING THE STRENGTHS OF YOUR CANDIDACY. DISCUSS THE FOLLOWING:

  • Disclose your disability - you do not need to go into extensive detail.
  • Describe your skills, strengths and experiences, addressing how you can/will do the job.
  • Discuss how your disability may impact you in the workplace and provide your employer with some options or suggestions for workplace adjustment.
  • Show that you are aware of attitudinal barriers that you may encounter in an office, and be prepared to discuss how you make others feel more comfortable around you.
  • The most important aspect of disclosing your disability is presenting yourself as a problem-solver.  Above all, you can compete on equal terms with people who do not have disabilities.

Example: "I want to be honest with you. I use a wheelchair because my legs are paralyzed as a result of an accident.  However, I assure you that my disability will not affect my ability to work or my attendance record. Please feel free to address any questions or concerns about how my disability might affect my work performance."

 

ONCE I’M HIRED, SHOULD I DISCLOSE MY DISABILTY?

Similar to a potential employer, you are not required to disclose your disability to your employer, and they cannot ask you about your condition. However, it is your responsibility to disclose your disability if you need any work-related reasonable accommodations. Keep in mind, disclosing your disability is on a need-to-know basis and should be addressed with the person who has the ability to facilitate your request for accommodations. This may be someone in Human Resources or your immediate supervisor. Also, it may not be required, but it is recommended to have your request in writing and to keep a copy for yourself.

 

OTHER DISCLOSURE RESOURCES:

TOP EMPLOYERS RECRUITING BLUE HENS:

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Contact us:

E-mail: udcareers@udel.edu
Phone: (302) 831-2392
401 Academy Street • Newark, DE 19716

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