Program Teaching Faculty

Faculty at the University of Delaware are organized by academic Departments or Programs. Faculty at the Winterthur Museum, Garden, & Library who teach classes to the Culture Fellows are located primarily in Academic Programs and the Curatorial Department, but Fellows also benefit from contact with Scientists and Conservators who work at the Museum.

Wendy Cooper

Wendy Cooper
Lois F. and Henry S. McNeil Senior Curator of Furniture, Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
wcooper@winterthur.org

Since 1995, Wendy A. Cooper has been Curator of Furniture at Winterthur Museum, becoming the Lois F. and Henry S. McNeil Senior Curator of Furniture in 1999. Prior to coming to Winterthur Ms. Cooper was Curator of Decorative Arts at The Baltimore Museum of Art from 1987 – 1995 where she organized the major traveling exhibition Classical Taste in America, 1800-1840, with a book of the same title published by Abbeville Press. A graduate of Brown University (B.A. 1967 – cum laude) and the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture, University of Delaware (M.A. 1971), she has worked at The Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. She has also worked with The National Gallery as guest curator on three exhibitions, In Praise of America: American Decorative Arts 1640-1840, (with a book of the same title published by Alfred A. Knopf), The Kaufman Collection of American Furniture, and An American Vision: Henry Francis du Pont’s Winterthur Museum (also with a publication of the same title).

She is presently working on an exhibition and publication featuring southeastern Pennsylvania furniture. Wendy helps to teach the Connoisseurship blocks on furniture andhas advised independent studies on furniture.

Linda Eaton
Linda S. Eaton
Director of Museum Collections, Senior Curator of Textiles, Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
leaton@winterthur.org

Linda Eaton is Director of Collections and Senior Curator of Textiles at Winterthur. She teaches the Textiles Connoisseurship Block and advises many theses that are related to textiles and clothing.

Linda’s background is in conservation, having trained at the Textile Conservation Centre (at that time based at Hampton Court Palace) with the Courtauld Institute of Art on the post-graduate program. Before coming to Winterthur she worked for the National Museums of Scotland. She came to Winterthur as a textile conservator, shifting gears to the curatorial side in 2000. At Winterthur she has curated a number of exhibitions including Deceit, Deception & Discovery, This Work in Hand: Philadelphia Needlework from the 18th Century, Needles & Haystacks: Pastoral Imagery in American Needlework, and Quilts in a Material World, and published a book by the same title in 2007. Working with Alison Buchbinder and Samantha Dorsey, she co-curated Who’s Your Daddy? Families in Early American Needlework; with Marla R. Miller and Katie Knowles she has co-curated Betsy Ross: The Life Behind the Legend.

Her current projects include a revised edition (in color) of Florence Montgomery’s seminal book Printed Textiles: English and American Cottons and Linens 1700-1850. Her other research interests include early 20th century interior design, and the interconnections between traditional and modernist art and design.

Ritchie Garrison

J. Ritchie Garrison
Director, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture
Professor of History
University of Delaware
77 East Main Street
Newark, DE 19711
(302) 831-2678
JRG@udel.edu

Ritchie Garrison teaches graduate courses for the Winterthur Program and the Department of History, including Material Life in America, Readings in American Material Culture, American Vernacular Landscapes, and Craftsmanship in Early America. He began his career as Director of Education at Historic Deerfield, Inc., in Deerfield, Massachusetts, and came to the University of Delaware in 1985 as the Assistant Director of the Museum Studies Program. In 2006, he became Director of the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture.

His fields of interests are the vernacular buildings and landscapes, pre-industrial craft, material culture historiography and theory, the history of agriculture, and the Civil War. He is the author of Two Carpenters: Architecture and Building in Early New England, 1799-1859 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2006), winner of the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s 2007 Abbott Lowell Cummings Prize for the best book in North American Vernacular Architecture, and the 2007 Historic New England, Inc. Book Prize. His first book, Landscape and Material Life in Franklin County, Massachusetts, 1770-1860, (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1991) was reprinted with a New Introduction in 2003. Garrison was co-editor with Ann Smart Martin of, American Material Culture: The Shape of the Field (Winterthur: The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, Inc. Distrib. By the University of Tennessee Press, 1997). Presently, he is editing a volume tentatively titled A Most Affecting Sight: The Diaries of John Ritchie and George Thompson Garrison of the Massachusetts 54th and 55th Black Regiments, 1863-65.

Emily Guthrie

Emily Guthrie
NEH Librarian, Printed Book and Periodical Collection
Winterthur Library
Winterthur, DE 19735
eguthrie@winterthur.org

Emily Guthrie joined the Winterthur Library staff in early 2005 as the assistant librarian for reader & reference services. She earned a degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art & Design, after which she spent seven years in North Carolina, doing everything from working as a grape harvester on the Biltmore Estate to apprenticing with a paintings conservator in Asheville. In library school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she worked in the Southern Historical Collection and Sloane Art Library, and focused on art librarianship and archives management. Emily is presently the NEH Associate Librarian in charge of Winterthur's Printed Book and Periodical Collection. She very much enjoys teaching the students about design sources and book connoisseurship using examples from the library's rare book and trade catalog collections.

Leslie Grigsby

Leslie Grigsby
Curator of Ceramics and Glass
Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
lgrigsby@winterthur.org

Leslie B. Grigsby received her graduate degree in Art Gallery and Museum Studies from Manchester University in England. Leslie began her career in the early 1980s as Curatorial Fellow and then Assistant Curator of Ceramics and Glass at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Before coming to Winterthur in 1999, Leslie spent ten years writing about early English pottery. Her numerous articles have appeared in The Magazine Antiques and other American and British publications. Her books include English Pottery 1650-1800: The Henry Weldon Collection, English Slip-Decorated Earthenware at Williamsburg, and the two-volume English Slipware and Delftware from the Longridge Collection. Her on-line catalog of English earthenware and stoneware at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee appears on that institution’s website. Currently, she has a major role in the development of Winterthur’s new website and object database.

In addition to her publications, Leslie has curated numerous exhibitions: “THE BEST IS NOT TOO GOOD FOR YOU”: English Slip-Decorated Earthenware; From Punch Bowls to Puzzle Jugs: Drinking Vessels & Traditions in England and America, and Time for Tea! Selections of Teaware from the Winterthur Collection. Her exhibition at London’s International Ceramics Fair (2002), Winterthur Turns Fifty: Ceramic Rarities at an American Country Estate, was the first exhibition from the Museum to travel internationally. She is now working on a major exhibition of wine-related objects at Winterthur, scheduled for 2012 and teaches the Connoisseurship blocks related to ceramics and glass.

Brock Jobe

Brock Jobe
Professor of American Decorative Arts
Office of Academic Programs
Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
(302) 888-4901
bjobe@winterthur.org

Brock Jobe teaches graduate courses in historic interiors, decorative arts, and 20th-century design in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture. He assumed the position of professor of American decorative arts in 2000 after a twenty-eight-year career as a museum curator and administrator. His previous posts included those of Research Assistant at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Curator of Exhibition Buildings at Colonial Williamsburg, Chief Curator at the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England, Inc.), and Deputy Director for Collections, Conservation, and Interpretation at Winterthur.

His fields of interest are early American furniture and upholstery and 18th and 19th century domestic interiors. He is the co-author of New England Furniture: The Colonial Era (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1984), winner of the Montgomery Award of the Decorative Arts Society, and organized and edited Portsmouth Furniture: Masterworks from the New Hampshire Seacoast (Boston: Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1993). His most recent work is Harbor and Home: Furniture of Southeastern Massachusetts, 1710-1850 (co-authored with Gary R. Sullivan and Jack O’Brien). Special exhibitions accompanied the publication of all three volumes. He teaches English Design History, 1530-1930; Decorative Arts and Design, 1860-Present;, American Interiors, 1800-1900; and portions of the Connoisseurship blocks on furniture.

Rosemary Krill

Rosemary T. Krill
Senior Lecturer
Office of Academic Programs
Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
302.888.4637
rkrill@winterthur.org

After receiving a master’s degree in American History with a Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Delaware where she was a Hagley Fellow, Rosemary Krill led education and interpretive efforts at the Monmouth County (NJ) Historical Association and the Hagley Museum in Wilmington, Delaware. Since 1988, she has pursued excellence in education, public programs, and academic programs at Winterthur. Projects have included a wide range of interpretive, visitor service, and academic activities, from developing elementary school programs to reinvigorating training for Winterthur’s large corps of museum interpreters. Her work in interpretive training at Winterthur led to publication of a book Early American Decorative Arts, 1620-1860: A Handbook for Interpreters, published by AltaMira Press. Her duties now include managing the Research Fellowship Program and teaching EAMC 601, Introduction to American Decorative Arts for the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture.

Rosemary is a member of the American Association of Museums (serving as co-chair of its Visitor Service Professional Interest Group, 2005-2008), the American Association for State and Local History, the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums, and the Museum Education Roundtable. She is a board member of the Tri-State Coalition of Historic Places in the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region. Since 2006, she has been an adjunct lecturer in the Museum Studies Program at the University of Delaware.

Gregory Landrey

Gregory J. Landrey
Division Director of Library, Collections Management and Academic Programs
Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
glandrey@winterthur.org

Gregory Landrey’s training began at age 16 when he started working as a cabinet shop assistant for the Corner Cupboard Antiques in Strafford, Pennsylvania. In addition to bench training, Landrey went to Gettysburg College, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in history. He joined Winterthur in 1979 as assistant furniture conservator, served as the head of furniture conservation from 1986-1995 and head of the Conservation Department from 1995-2006. He is now a Division Director for Library, Collections Management and Academic Programs. Landrey is an adjunct associate professor for the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture. He was a contributor to Conservation of Furniture (2003) a Butterworth-Heinemann book and worked with his conservation colleagues in writing The Winterthur Guide to Caring for Your Collection (2000).

Ann Wagner

Ann K. Wagner
Associate Curator of Decorative Arts
Department of Collections
Winterthur Museum
Winterthur, DE 19735
awagner@winterthur.org

Ann K. Wagner is responsible for the collection of silver, iron and other metalwork as well as related materials such as lighting, firearms, and organic materials. She joined the curatorial staff in 2004 after completing the Winterthur Program. Prior to this appointment, Ms. Wagner served for four years as the curatorial assistant for the American and European decorative arts department of the Seattle Art Museum, working principally with European and English ceramics and American silver. While in Seattle she participated in the exhibition and catalogue, Porcelain Stories from China to Europe.

She has lectured to audiences from Los Angeles to Williamsburg and has written articles about American silver for publications including The Magazine Antiques, Fine Art & Antiques, and Silver Magazine. With her Winterthur colleague Donald Fennimore, she co-authored the book Silversmiths to the Nation: Thomas Fletcher and Sidney Gardiner, 1808-1842, and co-curated an exhibition of the same title. This first significant investigation of Fletcher & Gardiner’s silver culminated in an exhibition of more than 200 examples of the influential firm’s work in gold and silver. This exhibit traveled to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Winterthur Museum, and The Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach, Florida. Her current projects include cataloguing the collection for the on-line database, researching a new exhibition and teaching the Connoisseurship blocks related to silver and base metals.

 

 

Winterthur Program in American Material Culture
Brock Jobe
Caption

Brock Jobe reflected in an English pier glass, 1750-1770, London.