University of Delaware

Lynx

Contents

Description
Where to Find Lynx
Instructions
Common Problems


Description

Lynx is a text-based World Wide Web (WWW) browser. Using Lynx, you can access almost all information on the Web. Lynx gives you an easy way to access the Web over a modem; you do not need to install PPP or any other special software--simply connect to the University's central UNIX systems as you would do if you were going to read your e-mail. There are no special requirements for using Lynx other than an account on the central UNIX systems. Lynx does not display any graphics or special file formats, but it does enable you to access WWW pages and hypertext links.

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Where to find Lynx

Lynx is accessible from the University's central UNIX system. Type lynx (lowercase) at the % prompt, and press the RETURN key to connect to the University's home page.

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Instructions

Introduction to Lynx

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Common problems and questions

  1. What is the difference between Lynx and other World Wide Web browsers?
  2. The primary difference between Lynx and other WWW browsers is that Lynx shows only text; it cannot display images. You do not use a mouse to navigate Lynx; you use cursor keys to move among the highlighted subjects, or links. These links lead to related subjects which lead to even more related subjects.

  3. Can I e-mail a Lynx file to myself?
  4. Yes. The P)ersonal mail address option allows the user to easily send files to his or her personal e-mail account. At the main screen type o to enter options, then type p at the command prompt. Type the desired e-mail address, and press the RETURN key.

    To send a file through e-mail from the main screen, type p. This command will take you to the print menu and offer four printing options. Select "Mail the file." When prompted to enter your e-mail address, press RETURN if the correct address already appears, or type a new one and then press RETURN to send the file.

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Last updated: April 28, 2005
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