The ocean's powerful winds make the coast an ideal location for a wind turbine. Ironically, it's that ocean air that presents a challenge to any turbine on or near the sea. The moist, salty air combined with a turbine's metallic materials can result in corrosion, a destructive process able to bring any power-generating source to a halt.

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The University of Delaware and the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) have created a new avenue to connect science with resource management by launching a series of workshops where environmental academicians and regulators can share current research and discuss research needs.

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Rajendra Pachauri, chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), will be the featured speaker in the DENIN Dialogue Series at 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 6, in Clayton Hall.

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The University of Delaware Sustainability Task Force is seeking two undergraduate students and two graduate students to join the task force co-chairs -- John Madsen and Kathleen Kerr -- at the ACPA Sustainability Institute in Boulder, Colo.

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Creating environmentally friendly high technology jobs for Delawareans was the focus of the "Creating the Clean Energy Economy" conference, held Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 13-14, at the University of Delaware's Clayton Hall.

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Energy

Energy usage in the First State

The Delaware Department of Natural Resources is looking for input to develop Delaware's New 5-Year Energy Plan. Please take the following survey regarding important Energy Issues facing Delaware to let the department know what is important to you. Input is needed on what Energy Issues should be studied to provide a path forward for Delaware's Energy Future. Take the Delaware Energy Survey

Extensive information about energy usage in the First State can be found at the Delaware Energy Office web site: www.energy.dnrec.delaware.gov/

The U.S. Department of Energy recommends that you save energy through the following means:

  • Set your thermostat comfortably low in the winter and comfortably high in the summer. Install a programmable thermostat that is compatible with your heating and cooling system.
  • Use compact fluorescent light bulbs.
  • Air dry dishes instead of using your dishwasher's drying cycle.
  • Turn off your computer and monitor when not in use.
  • Plug home electronics, such as TVs and DVD players, into power strips;turn the power strips off when the equipment is not in use (TVs and DVDs in standby mode still use several watts of power).
  • Lower the thermostat on your hot water heater to 120° F.
  • Take short showers instead of baths.
  • Wash only full loads of dishes and clothes.
  • Drive sensibly. Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gasoline.
  • Look for the ENERGY STAR® label on home appliances and products. ENERGY STAR® products meet strict efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.