GRADUATE POLICY HANDBOOK
Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice
University of Delaware

Edited: September, 2011
Effective: July 2004

Introduction
Program Overview
Requirements for Admission
Financial Aid
Transfer of Credit
Advisement
Regulations Regarding Graduate Status
Course Requirements for the Master's Degree
Course Requirements for the Doctoral Program
Instructional Education for Teaching Assistants
Addendum

INTRODUCTION

The Graduate Policy Handbook includes all policies and procedures pertinent to the graduate program in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice.  The interpretation of these policies and procedures is the responsibility of the Graduate Policy Committee.  Petitions for waivers of any requirements are the responsibility of, and must have the approval of, the Graduate Policy Committee.

Students may appeal decisions of the GPC following this procedure:

1. Petition the GPC for reconsideration by adding additional information that the applicant feels may be significant.
2. In the event the GPC does not change its decision, students may petition the full faculty.  A 3/4 vote is required to overrule the GPC.

Students who allege they have been aggrieved because of perceived discrimination on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation, handicap or because a member of the University community fails to follow published University or Departmental procedure should utilize the Student Grievance Procedure stipulated by University policy.

Deletions or modifications to the Graduate Policy Handbook become effective at the beginning of the following academic year.  Students are subject to rules existing at the time of entrance into the program.

Students should also consult the Graduate Catalog of the University of Delaware for University regulations regarding graduate degrees.

This version of the Graduate Handbook includes all revisions made since the publication of the original in 1991.

Important:
Requirements and other information are subject to change. Students are responsible for maintaining up to date information.  

I. PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice offers a Master of Arts and a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in both Sociology and Criminology. The primary focus of the program is the preparation of members of the next generation of sociologists and criminologists by emphasizing systematic training in theory and research methodology as well as teaching. These advanced education degrees are intended for persons interested in careers in academia, public service, or private enterprise. The Department has a large number of full-time distinguished faculty from the disciplines of Sociology, Philosophy, Law, Political Science, Criminology, History and Criminal Justice. This allows students to work closely with faculty members while preserving a reasonable breadth of interests. Thus, while both the Sociology and Criminology degrees rely on strong theoretical and methodological foundations, they also allow students to tailor a program that meets their individual needs.

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II. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

(International Students See: http://www.udel.edu/ofs)

All admission and funding decisions are made by the Graduate Policy Committee (GPC). Applicants are evaluated on several criteria: GRE scores , undergraduate/graduate grade point average, letters of recommendation (three), and applicant's statement of objectives. Applicants are also encouraged to submit a short writing sample. The GPC may also consider a limited number of other factors, including challenging social, economic, educational, cultural or other life circumstances, quality of undergraduate program, undergraduate major, relevant work/field/research experience, publications and reports, presentations, or other work demonstrating the ability to do graduate study in the field. International students must submit TOEFL or IELTS scores. Admission to the graduate program is selective and competitive based on the number of well-qualified applicants and the limits of available faculty and facilities. Those who meet minimum academic requirements are not guaranteed admission, nor are those who fail to meet those requirements necessarily precluded from admission if they offer other appropriate strengths. Completed applications are due February 1. We offer Fall admission only.

III. FINANCIAL AID

A.       Procedures for Awarding Funding

Financial aid is available to graduate students in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, tuition scholarships, and University fellowships. Assistantships and fellowships consist of tuition and a stipend for the September-May academic year. Awards are competitive and merit-based.

All funding decisions are made in consultation with the Graduate Policy Committee, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Department Chair. Continuing students without funding may petition the GPC to be considered for future funding. Letters of petition should be sent to the Chair of the GPC by the end of the Fall semester in order to be considered for funding for the following academic year.

B.       Procedures for Assigning Assistantships

Research Assistantships: Appointments are made in consultation with the faculty member conducting the research, the Director of Graduate Studies and the Department Chair. Faculty who anticipate funding for a research assistantship for the following academic year are encouraged to contact graduate students to inform them of possible research assistantship opportunities and to identify qualified students who wish to work on their projects. Research assistantships on funded projects may be offered to students not currently funded by the University or Department.

Teaching Assistantship: Appointments are made by the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the Chair each semester. Faculty are required to submit a request for a teaching assistant form for each semester they are seeking an assistant specifying their expectations of the assistant (e.g., facilitation of classroom discussion, preparation and grading of examinations).

The assignment of graduate students to faculty members should balance scholarly interests and professional objectives of the student and the teaching and research needs of the department. The Director of Graduate Studies may change assignments as necessary and make additional assignments if new sources of funding become available.

C.       Responsibilities of Funded Students

Assistantships carry the expectation of twenty hours of work per week. University guidelines stipulate that students holding assistantships are expected to give their full-time attention to graduate study and their assigned assistantship work during the fall and spring semesters. Students receiving University fellowships are expected to devote their full time to graduate study and may not engage in any remunerative employment while holding the fellowship. Students holding tuition scholarships have no employment restrictions. All students receiving financial aid must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Students awarded assistantships must satisfactorily fulfill the requirements of their assignments.

D.       Limits on Funding

Typically, eligibility for student funding is limited to 2 years of funding for students with a B.A. to earn the M.A. degree, and 3 additional years for these students to earn the Ph.D; for students entering with an M.A. degree, eligibility in typical cases ends after 4 years of funding. The GPC may recommend extending these time frames based on a student’s progress toward his/her degree and individual circumstances.

Funded students are not required to apply for renewal of their financial aid. Student funding is renewed as long as they remain in good standing in the program. "Good standing" is defined as strong performance in coursework, satisfactory fulfillment of their research/teaching assistantship duties, and timely progress toward completion of the degree. The Director of Graduate Studies is in charge of monitoring student progress, in consultation with the Graduate Policy Committee.

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IV. TRANSFER OF CREDIT

A maximum of nine (9) hours of graduate credit may be transferred toward the master's or Doctoral degree.

Petitions for graduate credit transfer may be submitted only after six (6) hours of graduate work have been completed at the University of Delaware. All petitions for transfer of graduate credit require the approval of the Graduate Policy Committee.

Only credits earned with grades of B- or higher are transferable.

V.ADVISEMENT

All students entering the program are assigned a Faculty Advisor and Graduate Student Peer Mentor. Assignments attempt to match the academic interests of students and faculty.

The academic advisor and student should plan and periodically review a plan of study that fulfills departmental requirement and provides comprehensive professional training. This plan of study should take account of students' backgrounds and available departmental resources.

Final responsibility for course selection and the meeting of departmental requirements resides with the student.

VI. REGULATIONS REGARDING GRADUATE STATUS

A.      Definition of Full-time Status

Students holding teaching or research assistantships involving specific responsibilities are required to register for a minimum of 6 graduate credits per semester. Please note, however, that in order to make normal progress through the program, it is typically necessary to take more than 6 credits per semester. Students holding a fellowship or scholarship with no work assignment are required to register for at least 9 credits of graduate level courses per semester.

Full time status is defined as 9 hours for unfunded students.

B.      Normal Progress and Time Limits for Completion of the Degrees

Normal Progress: Students are expected to make continuing progress toward the completion of their graduate education. In order to assess their progress and professional development, each graduate student is required to submit a self-evaluation to the Director of Graduate Studies by April 15. The self-evaluation should cover the student's activities involving completion of required course work, area examinations, thesis or dissertation progress, professional engagement (publications, conference presentations, involvement in external funding activities, and participation in research projects other than the thesis or dissertation), teaching, and other relevant items. In addition, a letter from one faculty member of the student's choice should be submitted. Under ordinary circumstances we define "normal progress" in the following ways:

Full-time students entering the master's program are expected to complete their master's degree by the end of their second year in the program. Students continuing into the doctoral program are expected to complete the doctorate by the end of their fifth year in the program.

Full-time students entering the Ph.D. program with a master's degree from another program or university are expected to complete the doctorate by the end of their fourth year in the program.

Time Limits: The statutes of limitations adopted by the Office of Graduate and Professional Education are as follows: For students entering into a master's program, ten consecutive semesters (5 years). Students completing the requirements for the master's degree who are subsequently granted admission into the doctoral program are given an additional 10 consecutive semesters (5 years). Students entering the doctoral program with a master's degree are given 10 consecutive semesters (5 years).

Exceeding these limits may result in dismissal from the program. Requests for extensions must be made in writing by the student and approved by the Graduate Policy Committee before they can be considered by the Office of Graduate and Professional Education.

C.      Quality of Graduate Work

Consistent with University regulations, a minimum "B" average (3.00) is required for certification of readiness to take comprehensive examinations and for conferral of a graduate degree. Students should consult the University catalog for further information regarding graduate standing.

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VII. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A. Course Requirements

All students at the master’s level are required to take 30 hours of graduate credit, at least 21 of which must be in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice.

Students have two M.A. options:
Thesis Option (Sociology or Criminology)
Examination Option (Sociology or Criminology)
All new students are required to take a non-credit one-hour pro-seminar.

Courses Required for M.A. in Sociology

1)      M.A. in Sociology with Thesis Option

 

SOCI 605 –  Data Collection

SOCI 612 –  Development of Sociological Theory

One course from the following: SOCI 606 –  Qualitative Methodology OR

SOCI 614 –  Advanced Data Analysis OR

SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics  OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling  OR (another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

 

5 elective courses - from at least two different substantive areas to assure breadth in substantive areas of sociology. Substantive areas include: Race, Gender, Collective Behavior/Disasters/Social Movements, Criminology, Law and Society, Deviance, Theory, and Research Methods.

 

SOCI 869 - M.A. Thesis (6  credits) cannot be taken pass/fail

2)      M.A. in Sociology with Master’s Examination Option

If a student chooses not to pursue a thesis, he/she can complete the M.A. in Sociology with a Master’s Examination Option. However, this is for a terminal M.A. only.

 

SOCI 605- Data Collection

SOCI 612 - Development of Sociological Theory

SOCI 621 - Deviance


One course from the following:

SOCI 606 - Qualitative Methodology OR
SOCI 614 - Advanced Data Analysis OR

SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling OR

(another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

 

6 elective courses - from at least two different substantive areas to assure breadth in substantive areas of sociology. Substantive areas include: Race, Gender, Collective Behavior/Disasters/Social Movements, Criminology, Law and Society, Deviance, Theory, and Research Methods.

Courses Required for M.A. in Criminology

1)      M.A. in Criminology with Thesis Option   

         
SOCI 605 - Data Collection
SOCI 612 - Development of Sociological Theory

SOCI 835 – Theoretical Criminology I

 

One course from the following:

SOCI 606 – Qualitative Methodology OR
SOCI 614 – Advanced Data Analysis OR
SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling OR

(another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

                   

4 elective courses (12 credits) from Group A and B with at least one course from each group:


Group A: Criminal and Deviant Behavior
SOCI 621 - Social Deviance

SOCI 630 - Juvenile Justice & Inequality
SOCI 836 - Application of Criminological Theory and Empirical Tests
SOCI 667 - When topic is crime or deviance

 

Group B: Criminal Justice and Legal Systems
SOCI 655 - Law and Society
SOCI 637 – Law and Society in Historical Perspective

SOCI 658 – Social Science, Law, and the Legal Process

SOCI 667 – When topic is law or justice system

SOCI 837 – Criminology and Systems of Criminal Justice

 

                 6 thesis credits

 

2)      M.A. in Criminology with Master’s Examination Option

If a student chooses not to pursue a thesis, he/she cancomplete the M.A. in Criminology with a Master’s Examination Option. However, this is for a terminal M.A. only.


SOCI 605 - Data Collection
SOCI 612 - Development of Sociological Theory

 

One course from the following:

SOCI 606 – Qualitative Methodology OR
SOCI 614 – Advanced Data Analysis OR
SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling OR

(another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

                   

SOCI 835 – Theoretical Criminology I

 

6 elective courses (18 credits) from Group A and B with at least one course from each group:


Group A: Criminal and Deviant Behavior
SOCI 621 - Social Deviance

SOCI 630 - Juvenile Justice & Inequality
SOCI 836 - Application of Criminological Theory and Empirical Tests
SOCI 667 - When topic is crime or deviance

 

Group B: Criminal Justice and Legal Systems
SOCI 655 - Law and Society
SOCI 637 – Law and Society in Historical Perspective

SOCI 658 – Social Science, Law, and the Legal Process

SOCI 837 – Criminology and Systems of Criminal Justice

SOCI 667 – When topic is law or justice system

 

B.  Master’s Thesis

The thesis will be in the form of a scholarly journal article.  With advice of the thesis committee each student will select a journal most appropriate to his/her area of interest, and write a paper of the type normally considered by that journal.

Each thesis will adhere to a particular journal’s page limits, bibliographic format, manner of data presentation, etc.  Where appropriate, students are encouraged to develop their thesis from research conducted for their course work, or from faculty members’ data bases. [Adopted April 12, 1996].

Candidates without a thesis committee may not accumulate more than three credits in SOCI 869. 

1.  Thesis Proposal Procedures

It is the responsibility of the student to form an M.A. thesis committee consisting of a Chairperson who is a member of the faculty of the department of Sociology and Criminal Justice and two additional members (one of whom may be from an outside department).

Upon obtaining the written consent of all potential members, the student notifies the Graduate Policy Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies by memo of the composition of the Thesis Committee.

The M.A. proposal defense is optional; the process for an M.A. proposal defense follows that of the Ph.D. proposal defense (below). Upon subsequent approval of the M.A. Thesis Proposal by the committee students provide one copy for their file (approved and signed by all members of the committee).  The chair of the Thesis Committee shall notify the Graduate Policy Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies and all members of the faculty by memo of the existence of the signed proposal as well as the proposed thesis title.

2.  Oral Defense of the Master’s Thesis

All requirements for the Master’s degree must be completed prior to defending the thesis.
The oral examination is administered by the Thesis Committee.  The thesis Chairperson shall be responsible for notifying the faculty ten (10) days prior to the scheduled examination and to see that a copy of the thesis is on file in the departmental office 10 days prior to the scheduled defense.

Any faculty member of the department may attend and examine if desired, but the right of voting is reserved to members of the thesis committee.

A majority vote of the committee is required for any action. The thesis and oral defense will be evaluated as a combined effort.  There are two possible outcomes:  Pass and Fail. In the case of failure, the oral defense may be repeated within one semester of the first attempt.

It is the responsibility of the Chairperson of the Thesis Committee to notify the Director of Graduate Studies in writing of the outcome.

Successful candidates need to provide copies of the completed thesis to the Office of Graduate and Professional Education, and one copy for the departmental archives and one copy for the chair of the committee. Students should consult with the Office of Graduate and Professional Education regarding regulation for graduate theses.

C. Examination Option

Candidates for the Master’s degree must take the Master’s examination prior to completion of their fourth semester in the program. Students considering the examination option must notify the Director of Graduate Studies to express the intent to take the examination the semester prior to taking the exam.

Examinations are written, and a maximum of three hours per exam is allowed.  Successful completion of the Master’s examination requires passing the exam in two areas.  Upon completion of the written examinations, an oral examination may be required at the option of the Area Examination Committee.

Candidates for the master’s degree are examined in:
I. Theory or methods,
II. One additional area from the standing areas of specialization offered in the department.

The examination in theory will cover the course content of SOCI 612 and a reading list provided by the area committee.  The examination in methods will cover the course content of SOCI 605, SOCI 614 or Method equivalents and a reading list provided by the area committee.  Standing area committees are responsible for providing reading lists and constructing and evaluating examinations.  Reading lists are to be provided at least one semester prior to the scheduled examinations.

If the candidate wishes to be examined in a specialized area for which there is no standing committee, the student must obtain three faculty members willing to serve as examiners in that area by providing reading lists and constructing and evaluating exams.

The Graduate Policy Committee must review and approve the petition of the student and inform the Director of Graduate Studies and the chairperson of the department and the committee of the decision.

Grading - Possible outcomes are: Pass and Fail.  It is the responsibility of the Chairpersons of the examinations committees to notify the Director of Graduate Studies in writing of the action taken by the examination committee.  Within one week of notification of the grade on the master’s examination, students will receive a detailed evaluation in writing from the chair of the examination committees.

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VIII. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTORAL DEGREE

A.     Admission to the Doctoral Program for students with an M.A. in Sociology or Criminology from the University of Delaware.

After successfully defending an M.A. thesis or passing an M.A. examination, the student submits a dossier to the GPC.  The dossier includes:
1.  A vita from the applicant describing: past academic achievement and activities (including TA, RA, or fellowship awards),
2.  A letter detailing the reasons for obtaining the Ph.D. in Sociology or Criminology; and an outline of the intended course of study (including both substance of course work as well as an expected schedule for completion of course work, exams, proposals and dissertation defense).
3.  Three letters of recommendation, one of which shall be a letter from the Master’s thesis advisor evaluating past graduate performance and future potential for doctoral work.


This dossier should be submitted by the end of the semester in which the student completes the M.A. degree. If this occurs during the summer, or during the beginning of the semester in which admission to the Ph.D. program is being requested, the GPC will consider the request as soon as possible during the fall semester. The student may register for Ph.D. courses while awaiting a decision on acceptance into the program.

Normally, the minimum GPA in all graduate course work should be a 3.5 but the Graduate Policy Committee may evaluate the GPA in light of other criteria such as course difficulty.  Passage of the Master’s thesis is also required.

The application must be approved by the GPC.

B. Course Requirements Regulations of the Office of Graduate and Professional Education require one continuous academic year of full-time residency for the Ph.D.

 

Ph.D. in Sociology

To permit maximum flexibility for developing an individualized Ph.D. program, there are no minimum course hour requirements.  However, the following specific courses are required:

SOCI 605 - Data Collection and Analysis

SOCI 614 - Data Analysis

SOCI 606 - Qualitative Methodology

 

SOCI 612 -  Development of Sociological Theory
SOCI 813 - Current Issues in Social Theory

SOCI 698 - Teaching Social Science (1 credit)              

 

One course from the following:

SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics (Highly Recommended) OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling  OR

(another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

 

4 elective courses (12 credits excluding independent studies)

 

Comprehensive Exams in two areas

 

SOCI 969 - Dissertation (9 credits)

Ph.D. in Criminology

To permit maximum flexibility for developing an individualized Ph.D. program, there are no minimum course hour requirements. However, the following specific courses are required:

SOCI 605 - Data Collection and Analysis

SOCI 614 - Data Analysis

SOCI 606 - Qualitative Methodology

 

SOCI 612 - Development of Sociological Theory
SOCI 835 - Theoretical Criminology I
SOCI 836 - Application of Criminological Theory and Empirical Tests
SOCI 698- Teaching Social Science (1 credit)

 

One course from the following:

SOCI 625 – Advanced Social Statistics (Highly Recommended) OR

PSYC 867 – Hierarchical Linear Modeling OR

(another course approved by the department methods comprehensive exam committee)

 

4 elective courses (excluding independent studies) from the courses listed in Parts A and B of the M.A.; HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SOCI 837 - Criminology and Systems of Criminal Justice

 

Comprehensive exam in Criminology and one additional area, except Social Deviance

SOCI 969 - Dissertation (9 credits)

C. Ph.D. Comprehensive Exams

Candidates for the doctoral degree must be certified in two specialized areas.  The department currently offers specialization in the following areas: Collective Behavior/Disaster Studies, Criminology, Deviance, Gender, Law and Society, Methodology/Statistics, Race, and Theory.  NOTE: Students in Criminology may not select deviance as their second area. 

Students are required to take at least one of their certified areas from the standing areas offered by the department.  If the candidate wishes to be certified in a specialized area for which there is no standing area committee, she or he may petition to do so after securing the agreement of three (3) faculty members willing to serve as examiners in that area by providing reading lists, constructing and evaluating examinations and other certification requirements.  The Graduate Policy Committee must review and approve the petition of the student and inform the Director of Graduate Studies and the Chairperson of the department of its decision.

1. Administration of Comprehensive Exams

Two dates will be established for comprehensive examinations, one at the beginning of the semester and one at the end of the semester. A given area exam, e.g., deviance, will be offered once per semester. The Director of Graduate Studies, in consultation with the area committee chairs, is in charge of scheduling. Comprehensive examinations will be administered to students in a common room with a maximum 6-hour time allotment and proctored by a faculty member.

2. Area Committees

Area committees are responsible for preparing reading lists, overseeing the respective curriculum in this area, and providing students with written guidelines to aid them in the selection of courses and preparation for examinations.  Area committees are responsible for designing the specific certification requirements for their particular area, preparing examination questions, and reading and evaluating exams.

Published guidelines and reading lists are reviewed and revised as necessary, usually on a regular cycle of every two (2) years.

Members of area committees and their chairs are appointed by the Chair of the Department.  Committees are composed of at least three (3) members of the faculty, but committees may consult other members of the faculty with competence in the area during the preparation of exams and reading lists.

Chairs of the committees are responsible for notifying students of their exam results. Committee Chairs are also required to notify the Director of graduate Studies of the results of examinations within one month of the exam.

3. Scope of the Examinations

Minimal preparation for written examinations includes the review of reading lists provided by area committees.  However, reading lists are merely guidelines and should not be considered as the sole basis for examinations.  Committees are responsible for clarification of the goals of reading lists, with specific attention to the question of whether such lists represent “minimal” or “exhaustive” definitions of the core literature. For each area of certification the candidate is expected to be: up-to-date with the literature in the field at the time of the exam, able to discuss the most important controversies, issues and problems (in both theory and methodology) that exist in the field, and capable of evaluating existing theory and methodology and suggesting new direction of effort.

4. Pre-requisites and Schedule of Examinations

Students are required to declare their intent to take a comprehensive examination, in writing, within the first two weeks of the previous semester to the Director of Graduate Studies who will notify the relevant Area Committee.  The Committee will schedule an interview with the student to explore his or her level of preparedness.  Students are expected to provide Committee members with written documentation of their preparedness in that area prior to the interview (e.g. courses taken, etc.) IMPORTANT: All Ph.D. course requirements, including any outstanding incomplete grades, must be completed before students are eligible to take Ph.D. examinations.

Students are required to take both comprehensive exams (and repeats thereof) in the same semester, or in consecutive semesters.

5. Grading

The outcome of examinations is determined by majority vote. There are four possible outcomes: Pass with distinction, Pass, Conditional outcome, Fail.

Conditional Outcomes: Students receiving this grade are required to complete additional work within two months of formal notification of the committee’s decision.  If the committee is satisfied with the quality of the work, the student will receive a grade of Pass.  If the committee is not satisfied with the quality of the work, the student will receive a grade of Fail.

Within one week of formal notification of the grade, students will receive a detailed evaluation in writing from the chair of the area committee.

Students who fail a written exam, or any part thereof, may request a re-reading from the original area examination committee.  This request is to be submitted within 20 days of the student receiving the detailed written evaluation.

6. Repeats of Examinations

  •  Only one repeat for each area is permitted.  Failure on a repeat examination is a permanent failure for that area.
  •  Three failures of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations in any combination shall result in dismissal from the program.


D. ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY

Formal Ph.D. candidacy follows the approval of the dissertation proposal. Procedures for admission to Ph.D. candidacy are as specified by the Office of Graduate and Professional Education. Admission to candidacy must be obtained before the deadlines specified in the academic calendar. Responsibility for seeing that admission is secured at the proper time rests with the student, but must include the recommendation of the student’s dissertation committee and the chairperson of the department. Students must complete and submit the required form.

E. DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS

1. Dissertation Committees

It is the responsibility of the student to form a four-person Ph.D. dissertation committee, consisting of a chairperson, who must be a member of the department, and three additional members, two from within the department and one from an outside department. Faculty on joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice are considered to be inside members of the department for the purposes of dissertation committees.

After obtaining the written agreement of all members of the committee, the student must notify the Director of Graduate Studies. Subsequent changes in the composition of the dissertation committee also require the approval of the Graduate Policy Committee. Overlap in membership between the Graduate Policy Committee and the dissertation committee does not require those involved to disqualify themselves.

Candidates without an approved dissertation committee may not enroll for more than three credits of dissertation research (SOCI 969).

2. Dissertation Proposals

Dissertation proposals should be worked out with the advice of the dissertation committee. It is strongly suggested that the committee meets with the student to discuss the proposal. The student makes a copy of the proposal available to the departmental faculty at least 10 business days in advance of the scheduled dissertation proposal defense date.

The Committee Chair communicates final approval of the proposal to the faculty and the Director of Graduate Studies. A signed copy of the proposal is placed in the student's permanent file.

The student is responsible for initiating the paperwork necessary for admission to formal candidacy by the University Coordinator of Graduate Studies. (Please consult the graduate catalog for specific time schedules).

3. The Ph.D. Dissertation

Students are expected to prepare copies of the dissertation for the departmental archives, the chair of the committee, and those required by the Office of Graduate and Professional Education.
The bibliographic format and style of the dissertation must conform to the standards of the Office of Graduate and Professional Education.

4. Oral Defense of Dissertation

An oral defense of the dissertation is required. It is administered by the dissertation committee. The dissertation Chairperson is responsible for notifying the faculty 10 days prior to the scheduled examination and to see that a copy of the dissertation is on file in the department office 10 days prior to the scheduled defense. The oral defense is open to the public, though the right of voting is reserved to the dissertation committee.

All other requirements for the degree must be completed before the oral defense of dissertation can be scheduled.

Grading is limited to Pass or Fail, and a majority vote is required for any action. It is the responsibility of the chairperson of the dissertation committee to notify the Director of Graduate Studies of the decision of the dissertation committee.

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IX. INSTRUCTIONAL EDUCATION FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS

The majority of graduate students in Sociology and Criminology are pursuing Ph.D.’s in preparation for a career in higher education.  Therefore, we are committed to providing our students with a broad and systematic set of instructional experiences as an integral part of their graduate education.

This will normally include the following elements:

A. CTE Conference:

All incoming students holding a teaching assistantship are required to participate in the Annual Conference for Graduate Teaching Assistant sponsored by the Center for Teaching Effectiveness.

B. Mentoring Experiences:

All faculty have accumulated a storehouse of knowledge and skills that they can and should share with students as part of an “every faculty as mentor” approach to the teaching enterprise.  Therefore, faculty supervising TAs are expected to offer students meaningful introductory instructional experiences commensurate with students’ experience and ability.  Included among the suggested activities are preparing exams, handling review sessions, developing a lecture or a seminar session.  We envision a process of planning, supervision and feedback for each of these activities.

C. Instruction in Teaching Techniques:

All Ph.D. students are required to enroll in a one-semester, one-credit Pass-Fail course in teaching techniques (SOCI 698: Teaching Social Science).  It will focus on some of the central elements in course preparation and instruction, vis., instructional philosophy, textbook evaluation, selection of reading assignments, syllabus preparation, managing large and small classes, developing lecture outlines and student evaluation techniques.

D. Individual Courses:

Students having participated in the courses on teaching and acted as a seminar leader will earn the privilege of teaching their own sections.  Students have the responsibility of enlisting the cooperation of a faculty mentor of their choice to provide advice and assist in assessing their effectiveness.

 

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X. ADDENDUM

A. Independent Studies

Independent study courses are not required. Rather, they are designed to provide students with the opportunity to take a course in an area or on a topic that is not offered by the Department but which is crucial to their area(s) of specialization.

B. Pre-candidacy Credits

Pre-candidacy credits are taken in preparation for the dissertation. They are taken after all required coursework has been completed but when students have not yet passed their comprehensive examinations and have not yet had their proposal approved. Students may enroll for anywhere from 3 to 12 credits. Pre-candidacy credits are not required. According to the Office of Graduate and Professional Education, pre-candidacy credits no longer count toward the degree after the completion of 12. If the student registered in Pre-Candidacy is admitted to candidacy before the end of the free drop/add period of the next semester, the registration in Pre-Candidacy Study (964) for the preceding semester may be changed to Doctoral dissertation (SOC 969). Once a student has passed his or her comprehensive examinations and has an approved proposal on file, Pre-Candidacy credits can be used as Doctoral Dissertation credits as described in the previous sentence. In order to do so, the student must contact the Assistant Provost in the Office of Graduate and Professional Education. While these are not independent studies, a student must enroll using a faculty member's supervised study number. It is typical that a student will enroll with the faculty member who will be chairing his or her dissertation.

C. Dissertation Credits

Once a student has passed his or her comprehensive examinations and has an approved proposal on file, he or she enrolls for 9 dissertation credits. While these are not independent studies, a student must enroll using a faculty member's supervised study number with the faculty member who is chairing their dissertation. A student may enroll for all nine credits in one semester. A student who wishes to enroll in 6 one semester and 3 in another must augment those 3 dissertation credits with 3 more credits from another source including: A course, an independent study, or 3 additional dissertation credits in order to maintain full-time status.

D. Doctoral Sustaining

Doctoral sustaining is for students who are ABD. They will have passed their comprehensive examinations, have an approved proposal on file, and have all 9 dissertation credits completed. Enrolling for doctoral sustaining implies that a student is working full-time on his or her dissertation and confers full-time status on that student.

E. Forms

Below is a list of the forms that students must complete as they progress through the program.

Copies of the forms are available in the Sociology office and online. Important: Students are responsible for the submission of all forms. Dates and deadlines can be found on the Office of Graduate and Professional Education homepage (udel.edu.gradoffice) under "UD STUDENTS."

1. "Application for Advanced Degree" form. Submitted in the semester you plan to graduate. Students completing the M.A. degree who intend to continue in the Ph.D. program must fill out and attach the "Change of Status" form. (To graduate as M.A. and as Ph.D.)

2. “Supervisory Committee Notification” form. Submitted to Department when members of the M.A. thesis committee of Ph.D. dissertation committee have been formally selected and agreed to serve.

3. "Confirmation of Dissertation Committee" form. Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Education after successful completion of the comprehensive examinations when members of the defense committee have been formally selected and agreed to serve.

4. "Recommendation for Candidacy for Doctoral Degree" form. Submitted after dissertation proposal has been approved.

5. “Defense Notification” form. Submitted prior to a defense.

6. "Ph.D. Defense Certification" form. Submitted after the defense.

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F. Resources

 

Several resources are available for students who seek help with academic and personal needs, including:

·         Center for Counseling and Student Development

·         Office of Disability Support Services

·         LGBT Community Office

·         Center for Black Culture

·         Office of Equity and Inclusion

·         University Writing Center

·         Center for Teaching and Learning

·         Research Office

·         Office of Professional and Graduate Education

 

Students should also be aware of University policies on behavior, including academic honesty, which can be found in the student guide to university policies. Note that graduate students who supervise undergraduates through TA or RA responsibilities may also be held to standards of the faculty handbook.

 

 

 The Graduate Program in Sociology and Criminal Justice