Political Science & International Relations

Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2014


 
POSC 150-010 Introduction to American Politics
 
Davis #5791 TR 1100-1215 PM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

This course is designed for any student who wishes to major in political science or fulfill a departmental or college requirement. In fact, this course would be useful to anyone interested in learning about America's national government, the political processes and the political system. The objectives of this course are: 1) to introduce students to the basic concepts associated with the study of political science; 2) to familiarize students with the basic principles of the U.S. Constitution; 3) to inform students about the roles, functions, and powers of the participants in the political system; and 4) to introduce students to the formal structures and institutions of the American national government and political system. Class activities will include lectures and discussions of various topics. Your professor will serve as the class manager, but you are expected to do the assigned readings and take part in class discussions.

 

 
 
POSC 150-011 Introduction to American Politics
 
Jones #5793 MWF 1010-1100 AM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

This course introduces students to fundamental issues of American government and politics. We will examine the underlying framework of government, the structure of political institutions, the participants in the system, and the ultimate source of power in a mass democracy – the American people themselves. The objective of the course is to provide students with a solid understanding of how the political system works, and to teach them to think critically about how and why it produces the outcomes it does. By the end of the course, students should feel comfortable analyzing day-to-day politics in the U.S. as well as understanding enduring questions such as: Do Americans know enough about politics to cast rational and informed votes? Why does the U.S. have only two major parties? How much influence do the media have on politics? Are politicians becoming more polarized and extreme? How do judges decide exactly which rights and freedoms we are guaranteed under the constitution?

 

 
 
POSC 240-010 Introduction to Global Politics
 
Ba #5801 TR 0930-1045 AM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

This course provides an introduction to the study of world politics and international relations by surveying the concepts and ideas that have defined and distinguished global politics and the evolution of the international system through the 20th and 21st centuries. Among the topics and concepts that students will discuss are issues of power, order, and justice, questions of intervention in world politics; globalization and interdependence; the variety of actors in world politics; and the roles played by international institutions. By offering a broad introduction to world politics, this course aims to give students elementary tools and frameworks for understanding both the changes and continuities of international life.

 

 
 
POSC 240-011 Introduction to Global Politics
 
Le Blanc #5803 MWF 0905-0955 AM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

The development of international systems, their structure and political economic dynamics. Fundamental analytical concepts and approaches.

 

 
 
POSC 240-012 Introduction to Global Politics
 
Martineau #13591 MWF 1220-0110 PM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

The development of international systems, their structure and political economic dynamics. Fundamental analytical concepts and approaches.

 

 
 
POSC 270-010 Introduction to Comparative Politics
 
Plewa #5807 MWF 1220-0110 PM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

While international relations study politics between states, comparative politics analyzes politics within states. Focusing on selected cases from Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa, the course aims to help you develop perspectives on a wide variety of political systems and processes, such as transitions in the Arab World, ethnic conflict or terrorism.

I appreciate that not all students learn in the same way. While some enjoy sitting through a 50 minute lecture, others find it a torture of a medieval variety. To accommodate various learning styles this course will combine traditional lecture with discussions, learning from me with learning from your peers, learning in class with learning outside of it, book readings with documentary movie analysis. I hope that between the various approaches utilized you will find yours and that you will consider what you learned in class useful in comparing the politics of various states.

 

 
 
POSC 300-010
Lab 020L
Research Methods for Political Science
 
Mycoff #7403 MW 0905-0955 AM
F 0905-0955 AM
 

This course will introduce the basic techniques of research design and data analysis. Completion of this course will provide the student with a firm grasp of how to carry out a research agenda, and the importance of research techniques in political science.

 

 
 
POSC 300-010
Lab 021L
Research Methods for Political Science
 
Mycoff #7405 MW 0905-0955 AM
F 1010-1100 AM
 

This course will introduce the basic techniques of research design and data analysis. Completion of this course will provide the student with a firm grasp of how to carry out a research agenda, and the importance of research techniques in political science.

 

 
 
POSC 300-011
Lab 030L
Research Methods for Political Science
 
Maka #10509 MW 1220-0110 PM
F 1220-0110 PM
 

Applied statistical analysis, including regression, analysis of variance, descriptive statistics and exploratory data analysis, statistical inference, and measurement.

 

 
 
POSC 300-011
Lab 031L
Research Methods for Political Science
 
Maka #10511 MW 1220-0110 PM
F 0125-0215 PM
 

Applied statistical analysis, including regression, analysis of variance, descriptive statistics and exploratory data analysis, statistical inference, and measurement.

 

 
 
POSC 301-010 State and Local Government
 
Johnson #15153 TR 0330-0445 PM
 

This course will engage in a critical examination of state and local governments and their governing capacities. We will explore the social and economic characteristics, legal structures, political processes, fiscal strength, leadership resources, and policy choices of state and local governments. The overall emphasis will be on understanding similarities and differences among the states and their importance in our federal system of government. Current events and issues will be discussed regularly.

Students will have the opportunity to act out their own strategies for political influence and community leadership during a role playing simulation of decision making in a medium sized city. Attendance during the role playing simulation is required. Because of the simulation, class size is limited to 60 students.

 

 
 
POSC 310-010 European Politics
 
Kinderman #9561 MW 0840-0955 AM
 

Provides an overview of the politics in the UK, France, Germany and Italy. We will seek to understand the differences between these countries and the patterns of continuity and change over time. We will also discuss whether one can speak of a “European economic and social model.” If so, what are its central characteristics? Can it survive?

 

 
 
POSC 311-010 Politics of Developing Nations
 
Counihan #5811 TR 0330-0445 PM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group B breadth requirement **
 

Up to 85% of the world’s population lives in what we commonly call the “Developing World”, however this huge segment of humanity is often overlooked in the academic study of the global political system. The Developing World is such a large and diverse place that it is very difficult to even talk about it as a single entity. Rather we tend to define it by what it is not, in comparison to the Developed World. In this class we will look at the global political system from a different perspective, from the vantage point of the “poor and powerless” and we will learn how it is quickly becoming less so.

 

 
 
POSC 313-010 American Foreign Policy
 
Meyer #9545 TR 1100-1215 PM
 

This course begins with a review of superpower relations during the Cold War and “post-Cold War” eras. The course then goes on to consider American foreign policies in four other areas: military power, economic policy, international human rights and policy toward the Third World.

Course requirements include four exams.

 

 
 
POSC 318-010 Public Opinion
 
Jones #13689 MWF 0230-0320 PM
 

What is “public opinion” and how do we measure it?

Where do people’s beliefs and attitudes come from – and why do they change?

How does public opinion influence government policies and actions?

Making sense of public opinion is, as pioneering researcher V.O. Key Jr. once put it, “a task not unlike coming to grips with the Holy Ghost”. This course will come to grips with the concept of public opinion by taking a variety of perspectives and developing a range of different skills. We will learn how to evaluate historical conceptualizations of what public opinion is, and philosophical arguments about what it should be. We will learn how to execute public opinion polls by exploring the science of sampling, question wording, and interviewing techniques. And we will learn how to conduct quantitative research on the sources, structure, and consequences of the American public’s attitudes. Throughout, we will use these skills to explore the extent to which ordinary citizens live up to the expectations of theorists of democracy.

Students are expected to have taken POSC 150 and 300 or their equivalents.

Enrollment requires Instructor’s consent after February 10, 2014.

 

 
 
POSC 329-010 International Migration
 
Plewa #15197 MWF 0125-0215 PM
 
** Cross-listed with SOCI, HIST & GEOG 329-010 **
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group C breadth requirement **
 

Why have people been migrating from one country to another, often despite significant risks involved? What impacts have such migrations had on migrants and on their home and host societies? How have we been influencing international migration through our everyday tasks – buying Mexican-grown tomatoes or contracting the cheapest lawn mowers available? Why do California tomatoes no longer taste and look like they used to until the late 1960s? How has international migration affected international development, security, or culture, including gender relations and religious diversity? How can we better analyze, and possibly manage, international migration? If any of these questions intrigued you, this course may be for you.

I appreciate that not all students learn in the same way. While some enjoy sitting through a 50 minute lecture, others find it a torture of a medieval variety. To accommodate various learning styles, this course will combine traditional lecture with discussions, learning from me with learning from your peers, learning in class with learning outside of it, readings with documentary analysis. I hope that between the various approaches utilized you will find yours and that you will develop your own perspective on this increasingly controversial, yet unavoidable subject matter.

 

 
 
POSC 330-080 Honors: Political Terrorism: The Islamic Space
 
Miller #10493 TR 0200-0315 PM
 
** Requires permission of Honors Program**
** Enrollment limited to 20 **
** Satisfies University multicultural requirement ** **
 

This semester's scope is delimited to what can be termed the Islamic space- a huge geographical area that now includes the transatlantic space with its growing Muslim populations. A number of historical and contemporary cases will be examined including Algeria, Lebanon, Israel\Palestine, Turkey, Western Europe and more. Student requirements include a midterm and final essay-style exams and a typewritten research paper on an approved topic within the ambit of the course.

 

 
 
POSC 333-010 Contemporary Political Ideologies
 
Son #13573 TR 0930-1045 AM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group A breadth requirement **
 

Ideologies—systemized sets of ideas—are an essential part of our political life. Ideologies help us make sense of our experience which is often too complicated; they enable us to set priorities and make judgments; and they motivate us to take action. In this course, we will examine some of the most influential political ideologies and the debate surrounding them. We will begin with liberalism, conservatism, and socialism, and then consider major challenges to those traditional doctrines, including anticolonialism, antiracism, feminism, and environmentalism. We will focus on the theoretical foundations of various ideologies, paying close attention to the ways in which those ideologies are appropriated and mobilized in contemporary politics.

 

 
 
POSC 350-010 Politics and the Environment
 
Johnson #13691 TR 0200-0315 PM
 

This course examines the nature and process of environment¬al politics and the development of policies addressing a variety of environmental problems, both in the United States and globally. We will focus on the individual basis (motivations, values, and perception) of environmentalism as well as the role of key institutions and actors (the President, Congress, courts, states, interest groups and international organizations). We will review major U.S. pollution control and environmental policies and delve into the contentious nature of environmental politics by studying a variety of cases of environmental policy making in depth.

This course is required for majors in Environmental Science and Environmental Studies. It is intended to provide the foundation for 400 level courses in environmental politics and policy.

Course requirements include two essay exams, a group research project, and an individually written paper on the group research topic.

 

 
 
POSC 350-011 Politics and the Environment
 
Johnson #13709 TR 0930-1045 AM
 

This course examines the nature and process of environment¬al politics and the development of policies addressing a variety of environmental problems, both in the United States and globally. We will focus on the individual basis (motivations, values, and perception) of environmentalism as well as the role of key institutions and actors (the President, Congress, courts, states, interest groups and international organizations). We will review major U.S. pollution control and environmental policies and delve into the contentious nature of environmental politics by studying a variety of cases of environmental policy making in depth.

This course is required for majors in Environmental Science and Environmental Studies. It is intended to provide the foundation for 400 level courses in environmental politics and policy.

Course requirements include two essay exams, a group research project, and an individually written paper on the group research topic.

 

 
 
POSC 377-010 Arab Israeli Conflict
 
Miller #13581 TR 1100-1215 PM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Science Group B breadth requirement **
** Cross-listed with Jewish Studies **
 

Development of the Arab-Israeli conflict analyzed from the Dreyfus Affair and the Balfour Declaration to current events.

Paper and two mainly essay-style exams required.

 

 
 
POSC 380-010 Introduction to Law
 
Batchis #11179 MWF 1115-1205 PM
 
** Cross-listed with LEST 380 **
 

This course offers a broad introduction to the American legal system. It is designed to expose students to the demands of legal reasoning and provide some insight into what it may be like to attend law school.

The class explores the sources, objectives, and content of American law, the structure and processes of federal and state courts, and the functions of the various players who make up the legal system. It includes an overview of select substantive topics, such as criminal, contract, tort and property law. Like a law school classroom, participation is mandatory. Students will be called on at random and will be expected to discuss the assigned cases and materials. It is thus essential that students come to class prepared.

Note: ALL students who would like to register for this course MUST attend the first class. Students who do not attend the first class, including those on the waiting list, will NOT be permitted to add this course.

This section DOES NOT meet the A&S Second Writing Requirement.

 

 
 
POSC 387-010 American Political Thought
 
Martin #9903 T 0600-0900 PM
 

This course is designed as a seminar class. The course will explore in-depth the basic principles, concepts and traditions of American Political Thought. The course will proceed historically, covering material from the founding of the country to more recent controversies associated with the New Deal/The Great Society, and beyond. Emphasis will be placed upon a variety of theoretical positions and traditions concerning such concepts as rights, representation, and the appropriate structure and scope of the government.

This section DOES NOT meet the A&S Second Writing Requirement.

 

 
 
POSC 401-010 Topics in Constitutional Law:
Criminal Procedure
 
Danberg #7247 M 0600-0900 PM
 
** Not Open to Freshman **
 

This course examines the constitutional law of criminal procedure as it has developed through decisions of the United States Supreme Court. Topics of discussion will include due process of law, arrest, search and seizure, electronic surveillance, the right to counsel, self- incrimination, trial by jury and sentencing. Students will learn how to read, analyze and brief Supreme Court cases. In-class participation is a substantial component of the final grade. This course should be interesting for any student considering attending law school.

Note: ALL students who would like to register for this course MUST attend the first class. Students who do not attend the first class, including those on the wait list, will NOT be permitted to add this course.

 

 
 
POSC 403–010 Civil Liberties: Equal Protection
 
Magee #13569 TR 0200-0315 PM
 
** Not open to Freshmen **
 

This course focuses on the concept of equality protected in the United States Constitution. The political culture of the United States includes a commitment to “equal justice under law,” a pledge etched in stone on the façade of the temple housing the Supreme Court of the United States, and a constitutional guarantee of “equal protection of the laws.” This course examines and appraises the extent to which this increasingly diverse nation, by legislation and judicial interpretation, has honored these pledges. Among other subjects, we will cover voting rights, education, school desegregation, affirmative action, sexual orientation, and a few “fundamental rights” that the Court has discovered within the many invisible folds of the Constitution. Grades will be measured through in-class examinations, perhaps a few quizzes, a “moot court” simulation/writing exercise, and involvement in class discussion. Enrollment is limited to 40 students.

NOTE: ALL students who would like to register for this course MUST attend the first class. Also, students on any wait list who do not attend the first class will NOT be permitted to add this course.

 

 
 
POSC 403–011 Civil Liberties: Equal Protection
 
Magee #14834 TR 0330-0445 PM
 
** Not open to Freshmen **
 

This course focuses on the concept of equality protected in the United States Constitution. The political culture of the United States includes a commitment to “equal justice under law,” a pledge etched in stone on the façade of the temple housing the Supreme Court of the United States, and a constitutional guarantee of “equal protection of the laws.” This course examines and appraises the extent to which this increasingly diverse nation, by legislation and judicial interpretation, has honored these pledges. Among other subjects, we will cover voting rights, education, school desegregation, affirmative action, sexual orientation, and a few “fundamental rights” that the Court has discovered within the many invisible folds of the Constitution. Grades will be measured through in-class examinations, perhaps a few quizzes, a “moot court” simulation/writing exercise, and involvement in class discussion. Enrollment is limited to 40 students.

NOTE: ALL students who would like to register for this course MUST attend the first class. Also, students on any wait list who do not attend the first class will NOT be permitted to add this course.

 

 
 
POSC 405-010 Constitutional Law of the United States
 
Magee #10495 MW 0335-0450 PM
 
** Not open to Freshmen **
 

Primarily through reading lawsuits decided ultimately on appeal by the United States Supreme Court, students will explore constitutional disputes regarding the separation of powers designed by an 18th century document (amended occasionally since). Our focus is on the legislative, executive (including presidential war powers), and judicial branches of the United States as the national government has tried to cope with an array of problems facing a society that has been transformed from the original 13 post-revolutionary states into the world’s only remaining “superpower.” Some attention will be given to federalism (the relationship between the states and the national government). There is one textbook that students will have to purchase. Grades will be measured through in-class examinations, perhaps a few quizzes, a “moot court” simulation/writing exercise, and involvement in class discussion.

NOTE: ALL students who would like to register for this course MUST attend the first class. Also, students on any wait list who do not attend the first class will NOT be permitted to add this course.

 

 
 
POSC 409-011 Topics in World Politics
“America in the Middle East”
 
Green #8305 MWF 0230-0320 PM
 

What have been America’s proclaimed interests in the Middle East over time, and what could be said to be its “proper” interests there? What has America achieved from its entanglement with the region? This course examines the history of America’s engagement with the Middle East, going back to the WWII era, but with an emphasis on issues since 1979. After a brief introductory portion on the mechanics of American foreign policy-making in general, and America’s global political and strategic position over time, we will spend most of the semester on America’s involvement in: regional oil politics, the Middle East peace process, the first and second Iraq Wars, relations with Iran, plans for Middle East democratization and the Bush II administration. Evaluation will be based upon a mid-term and final exam, a medium-length research paper, and one or two short writing assignments.

May be repeated once when topics vary.

This section does NOT meet the A&S second writing requirement.

 

 
 
POSC 410-010 Islam in Global Affairs
 
Khan #13755 MW 0335-0450 PM
 

This course seeks to explore the role that Islam plays in Global Affairs. While in Arabic the word Islam means submission, in the political context it is used to represent a faith, a civilization, a global political community, a trans-national actor, an ideology and a set of values. Islam is clearly one of the most powerful global identities and this course shall explore how the struggle to construct Islam is reconstructing the international system. The Arab World today is experiencing a spectacular awakening; Islam in Global Affairs will systematically explore the nature and prospects of the revolutions.

 

 
 
POSC 411-010 Politics and Poverty
 
Davis #10501 TR 0330-0445 PM
 

This course is for political science majors or any student interested in studying politics, poverty and the development of antipoverty policies and programs in the U.S. It is designed to help students understand the social, political, and economic dynamics of poverty and social welfare policy in America. We will discuss the political nature of poverty, contending political theories of the causes of poverty, the consequences poverty, and current policies designed to address the problem. The aim of this course is to increase students understanding of our reluctant welfare state and the role that politics has played in creating it. Among the objectives of this course are: 1) to examine the historical foundations of poverty in America: 2) to examine the social, political, and economic causes and consequences of poverty; 3) to discuss and identify practical solutions to poverty in the current social, political, and economic environments; and 4) conclude with a brief discussion global poverty and reduction strategies. Class activities will include lectures and class discussions on various topics. Your professor will serve as the class manager, but you will be expected to do the assigned readings and take part in class discussions

 

 
 
POSC 415-010 Force and World Politics
 
Kaufman #10499 TR 1100-1215 PM
 
** Satisfies the Arts and Sciences second writing requirement **
 

Countries go to war because their leaders believe war is the best way to achieve their political goals. The war in Iraq provides a good example of the difference between political and military goals: American troops were astoundingly successful in defeating the Iraqi army, but Americans have since discovered that achieving their political goals was going to be much harder. This course explores how such things happen, focusing on two themes: military strategy, the plans leaders devise for how to use military force to achieve their political goals; and the political constraints they face in turning military action into political success. Topics include the theory of war in the classic works On War by Carl von Clausewitz and The Art of War by Sun Tzu; military strategy in the World Wars and Vietnam; and contemporary dilemmas of military occupation and state-building.

 

 
 
POSC 419-010 International Relations History
 
Green #13657 MWF 1115-1205 PM
 
** Satisfies the Arts and Sciences second writing requirement **
 

This course analyzes patterns and key developments in international relations going back to the eighteenth century. In doing this, it seeks to provide a background for discussing some of the most pressing "big picture" issues facing the global political system today: Is our global future one of the inevitable spread and triumph of liberal democracy? Are we in for a coming "clash of civilizations" between the West, Islam, and East Asian Confucianism? Is America on the decline? If so, with what implications, and who will be the next leading country? Are we heading toward world government or fragmenting, fighting nationalism? These questions, fun to think about but rarely approached rigorously, are precisely the topic of this course. In the first two-thirds of the semester, we will review some of the key concepts from international relations needed to pick apart these questions, discuss frameworks for dealing with them, and look at the history of the international system from 1750 to today to provide a historical context for where we are today. The last third of the semester is devoted to reading about and debating these issues.

As a second writing class, students will write, revise and re-submit two short papers. There will be a small mid-term exam as well. Discussion and participation play an integral part; the course's pace will be determined by the needs of the students.

 

 
 
POSC 423-010 Congress
 
Mycoff #8297 MWF 0125-0215 PM
 

This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of the foundations, organization, and practices of the Congress. The purpose of this class is to provide students with an understanding of Congress and its members. We will explore how members of Congress can balance competing interests in making policy while seeking reelection. In this course we will tackle important questions about Congress and the policymaking system including how the Congress makes policy, Congress’s relationship with President Obama, and how the Congress provides oversight to bureaucratic agencies.

This course will integrate content on the U.S. Congress with a semester-long congressional simulation. Students will take on the role of a member of Congress and work together to pass legislation. The simulation will be used to test theories of congressional behavior.

This course requires a basic understanding of American government and Congress’s role in the institutional structure. I expect all students to have a POSC 150-level understanding of Congress before taking this class. As this is an upper-level course the reading load is quite heavy. The typical reading assignment includes about 100 pages of reading per week. Students will be graded on exams, written assignments and participation in the simulation.

 

 
 
POSC 429-010 Southeast Asia and the World
 
Ba #13695 TR 0200-0315 PM
 
** Course satisfies University Multicultural requirement **
 

This course examines international relations within Southeast Asia and between the region and greater powers. Designed as an introductory course to the region, the course will examine Southeast Asia’s sources of insecurity and interactions between domestic, regional, and global levels of politics as a way to understand Southeast Asia’s regional and world politics. Particular attention will be paid to questions of regional organization and regional cooperation, especially the role played by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The course considers the changing roles of the United States, China, and Japan in Southeast Asia and East Asia more generally. Among the topics to be discussed and debates include the roles played by China and Japan in integrating the region, South China Sea territorial disputes, great power and small power politics, as well as the significance of recent US policies (known as the US “pivot” or “rebalance” to East Asia. While not required, students are strongly recommended to have taken Introduction to International Relations (POSC 240) or Theories of International Relations (POSC 448).

 

 
 
POSC 430-010 Intermestic Relations of Islam and America
 
Khan #13579 M 0600-0900 PM
 

Explores intermestic (international and domestic) relations between Islam and United States. The course will examine the history and politics of US-Muslim relations. An important component of the course will be Islam in America – evolution of the American Muslim Community, its demographics, identity politics and the rise of Islamophobia. The course will also examine US’ evolving foreign policy in the Muslim World in the wake of the Arab spring.

 

 
 
POSC 436-010 Politics and Literature:
“African Politics and African Literature”
 
Bauer #14835 MW 0840-0955 AM
 
** Course meets College of Arts & Sciences Group A breadth requirement **
 

This class will consider politics in Sub-Saharan Africa from colonialism to the present through literature. We will read several novels, memoirs or other genres that will help us to better understand the colonial experience in Africa, the early years of independence, strife and war on the continent, the roles of ethnicity and religion, particular issues facing women and girls, the hope of more recent transitions and the increasing place of 'new diasporas' across the continent. There will be a significant amount of reading and writing and students will also assist in leading class discussion.

Course has been approved to fulfill a 4xx-level requirement for the International Relations Major - African Specialization.

 

 
 
POSC 438-080 Honors: Topics in Political Theory:
Debating Capitalism
 
Son #15216 TR 0330-0445 PM
 
** Requires permission of Honors Program **
** Enrollment limited to 20 **
 

Capitalism is not simply an economic system but a social and cultural system that relies on, and shapes, our normative assumptions. It is premised, for example, on cultural consensus on what can be sold and bought for a price. If putting babies up for sale is debatable, so is putting a price tag on their education; we just don’t question the latter as readily. Moreover, capitalism deeply affects our beliefs, aspirations, and behaviors. We are constantly enticed to crave commodities, and exhorted to groom ourselves for the “job market.” In doing all this, does capitalism make us happy? Does it encourage virtue or vice? Does it promote democracy and justice? This course explores these questions through a study of some of the most important philosophical arguments about capitalism.

 

 
 
POSC 444-010 Global Agenda 2014 -
Global Demands, Regional Responses
 
Carrión #5819  
 
** Cross-listed with COMM 444-010 **
** Open to Junior and Senior Majors only **
 

This international policy speaker series focuses on current global demands and changes and the regional responses to those changes. Topics include Latin America’s responses to the end of its economic boom, the challenges of democratization in the Middle East, Africa’s social, political, and economic transformations, China’s response to Global demands, Europe’s troubles and opportunities, and current trends in international public opinion. Students are required to attend talks and small group dinners with prominent international affairs speakers/practitioners on these topics.

Limited enrollment. Regular class meets once a week on Wednesdays only. Students must note the extensive student time commitment with visiting speakers on six Wednesday evenings (see below).

Students interested in taking POSC 444 must complete an application. A limited number of (50) applications will be disseminated.

Applications will be available in 347 Smith Hall, between 8:30-4:00 pm, from Wednesday, November 13th through Tuesday, November 19th.

Completed applications are due by Wednesday, December 4th.

Schedule of this course is very unusual:

Wednesday – 3:35-4:50 pm (class weeks with no speakers)

Wednesday – 3:35-9:00 pm (alternate weeks, with guest speaker, includes required attendance in class, reception, dinner and public lectures)

Invitations to have dinner with the speaker will rotate weekly amongst students but students are required to attend the class and lectures every week regardless.

 

 
 
POSC 450-010 Topics in Latin American Politics:
Democracy, Development, and Human Rights in Latin America
 
Balasco #15292 MWF 0335-0425 PM
 
** Satisfies University Multicultural requirement **
 

POSC 450 will examine one of the most central issues of Latin American politics these days, namely the difficulties that many nations in the region face in establishing and/or sustaining democratic governance. We will study the process of transition from military rule to civilian government, and the social, economic, and political challenges that these new civilian regimes faced in the 1965s and 1990s.In addition, we will examine the resurgence of populism and left-wing politics in the region. Some of the specific issues that this course will address include: democratic transitions and authoritarian reversals; market reforms and economic inequality; human rights; transitional justice; rule of law; the role of the military; public opinion and democracy.

In addition to weekly readings and writing assignments, students will be asked to take a mid-term examination and a final take-home exam.

This section does NOT meet the A&S second writing requirement.

 

 
 
POSC 462 Climate Change:
Policy, Equity and Mitigation
 
Firestone #15250 TR 1100–1215 PM
 
** Cross listed with MAST 462 and UAPP 465 **
 

Climate Change has emerged as the most important environmental issue of our time and one of the key issues regardless of subject matter national and globally. This course will explore the developments in climate change policy. We will briefly focus on climate change science before focusing on equity and the UNFCCC and the compliance mechanisms established under Kyoto Protocol. We will then examine US initiatives in the legislative, administrative and judicial spheres at the federal and state levels and consider one potential long-term solution to climate change.

 

 
 
POSC 464-000 Internship in Political Science and International Relations
 
  #15217  
 
** Requires permission of Internship Director **
 
Internship Director – Dr. Phillip Jones - Contact pejones@udel.edu
 

See the department website at http://www.udel.edu/poscir - Undergraduate “Internships” for forms and Student Responsibilities.

On the “Internships” page, you will find a listing of places students have interned in the past. You can contact any of these locations to inquire about current internship opportunities. On this page, you will also find a list of current advertised internship opportunities.

You may also find opportunities on the Career Services Center web site – http://www.udel.edu/CSC

 

 
 
POSC 467-010 Water and Politics in Africa:
“Systems of Water Governance in Africa”
 
Salo #15217 MWF 0335-0425 PM
 

In African countries water is a key resource needed to ensure the continuity of regional and national economies, security, and to sustain livelihoods. Water also informs men and women’s gendered and cultural identities. African systems of governance to ensure sustained access to water are complex, and cut across transnational boundaries and multiple national state sectors. In this course we will examine how systems of water governance over shared water resources on the continent have developed to meet national citizens’ gendered rights to safe, water sources, to ensure the efficient use of water in the economy and in relation to global environmental protocols that enshrine the protection of water as valuable natural resource, as well as global and continental human rights protocols. We will focus on systems of water governance in select regional and country case studies to identify the diverse institutional arrangements of governance, and how these systems have sought to balance the competing regional and national claims to shared water resources as a human and gendered right as well as a key economic resource that has to valued and utilized efficiently.

Course has been approved to fulfill a 4xx-level requirement for the International Relations Major - African Specialization.

 

 
 
POSC 475-010 Model United Nations
 
De Leon #13585 MWF 0335-0425 PM
 

The goal of this course is to explore three current debates in international politics, using United Nations simulations.