Medicine

 
 
In addition to its other uses, genetic engineering can be used for many aspects of medicinal purposes. 

One way that genetic engineering can increase health is by cutting and creating genes.  For example, a diabetic's body lacks the important hormone insulin.  Scientists first remove the gene that creates insulin from a healthy donor.  Using hybrid techniques, an insulin gene can be created and replicated for a diabetic. 

 The treatment of heart disease can also now be accomplished using genetic engineering.  A company called Cardiovascular Genetic Engineering Inc. has used angiogenic (heart + genes) theories to create more blood vessels in and around the heart of patients with blocked arteries.  This company hopes to find cures for cancer and other diseases using genetic methods in the future.
          Cardiovascular Genetic Engineering Inc.

Despite the tremendous breakthroughs in medicine, all claims to increase health through genetic engineering cannot be trusted.  Cell Signal Enhancers, or CSEs "are a revolutionary new class of medicines that combine today's advanced molecular biotechnolgy, basic homeopathic principles and bioelectric medicine to help people achieve a greater sense of physical and mental balance," or at least that's what they claim.  The drug promises an improved appearance, an increase in muscle mass without exercise, and other miraculous improvements.  Upon a close and informed reading of the drug's description however, the words "homeopathic hGH therapy" stick out.  Many people consider homeopathic preparation to be synonymous  with that of placebo drugs, or medicines that contain no real effective ingredients.  Anyone who pays the $29.95 for the "miracle drugs" will not get what they expected.

 
 

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Created as part of a term project for SCEN103 at the University of Delaware 
Comments, suggestions, or requests to jenlf@udel.edu 
"http://www.udel.edu/physics/scen103/CGZ/cons.html" 
Last updated May 10, 2000. 
Copyright Jen Franchino, Vinnie Verruto, Allison Zuckerbrow, 
Jeff May, Univ. of Delaware, 2000