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Chemistry 410

History of 
Physical Chemistry


 

 

Announcements

CHEM 410 has a limited enrollment.  If you wish to take this course, you are advised to register early.


Course Information

Absences

Assignments

Course Description

Exams and Papers

Grades

Instructor

Texts


Return

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: http://www.udel.edu/pchem/images/psicon.jpgPhysical Chemistry Division

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: http://www.udel.edu/pchem/images/bigc.jpgChemistry/Biochemistry Department

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Course Description

CHEM 410
HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY
3 hours
A survey of the development of chemistry.

 

This course focuses on the historical development of physical chemistry as a discipline, particularly in the United States, from the late 1880s to the 1950s and 1960s.  The course emphasizes the personalities and interactions that accompanied the development and spread of physical chemistry in the United States at a time when scientific study was being incorporated into academic life and universities were developing rapidly.

PREREQUISITE: General Chemistry.

This class is intended to contribute to the liberal arts education of students (mission 3) and increase the general literacy with respect to the origin of the subject (General Education Goal #2).  You will learn about the history of physical chemistry and related subjects, how they developed over time and how they influence the way we think about chemistry today.  The course is a second-writing course, so you will learn about communication through writing, as well as through communication in class. (10)


Course Venue

Ø  Tuesdays and Thursdays

Ø  2:00 – 3:15 p.m.

Ø  218 Gore Hall

 

Instructor

Ø  Cecil Dybowski

Ø  035 Brown Laboratory

Ø  (302) 831-2726

Ø  dybowski@udel.edu

Ø Office Hours:  Any time, if available


Texts

o   K. J. Laidler, The World of Physical Chemistry, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1993.

o   J. W. Servos, Physical Chemistry from Ostwald to Pauling, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1990.


Other Interesting Books

Diana Kormos Barkan, Walther Nernst and the Transition to Modern Physical Science, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999.

Cathy Cobb, Magick, Mayhem, and Mavericks:  The Spirited History of Physical Chemistry, Prometheus Books, Amherst, New York, 2002.

Patrick Coffey, Cathedrals of Science, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008.

Andrew Ede, The Rise and Decline of Colloid Science in North America, 1900 – 1935, Ashgate Publishers, Burlington, Vermont, 2007.

Richard P. Feynman, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out, Perseus Publishing, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1999.

Istvan Hargittai, TheRoad to Stockholm, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002.

Aaron J. Ihde, The Development of Modern Chemistry, Dover, New York, 1984.

Stephen Inwood, The Forgotten Genius: The Biography of Robert Hooke 1635 – 1703, MacAdam/Cage Press, San Francisco, 2003.

Laylin K. James, Nobel Laureates in Chemistry 1901 –1992, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 1993.

Lisa Jardine, The Curious Life of Robert Hooke, The Man Who Measured London, Harper-Collins, New York, 2004.

David Lindley, Degrees Kelvin: A Tale of Genius, Invention, and Tragedy, Joseph Henry Press, Washington, D.C., 2004.

Tom Schachtman, Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold, Mariner Books, New York, 2002.

John T. Stock, Ostwald’s American Students,Plaidswede Publishing, Concord, New Hampshire, 2003.

           


Exams and Papers

Exams
There will be two examinations, as indicated on the assignment table.  The examinations will have multiple-choice and essay questions covering the reading and class discussions.   There is no final examination in this course.

Papers
Because this is a second-writing course, students are expected to develop original papers on historical aspects of physical chemistry. Each paper has a length limit, imposed to prevent sensory overload of the instructor. Aside from the word limit, elements such as content, style, neatness and attention to writing details determine the grade. All papers must be written with a word processor, single-spaced and in proper format.  Papers are due no later than the beginning of class, as indicated in the schedule. Late papers (with an unexcused absence) will not be accepted and grades of zero are assigned for them.   The paper should be sent to the instruction in portable document format (PDF) by attaching it to an electronic message before the time it is due; see the instructor if you cannot send the paper in this manner.  The title of the file should be “Paper X – Your Name,” where X is the number.  The writing sample is paper 0. 

Plagiarism in all its forms is punishable by assignment of a grade of zero; that includes – but is not limited to – undocumented use of appreciable work of others as if it is your own.

o   Writing sample; paper 0

A one-page discussion of a contribution to the literature.  The paper should explain results reported, methods used, and reason the authors chose to write on this particular topic.  The reference to the article is Krimigis, S. M.; et al. Science 2013, 341, 144 – 147. This paper is graded on understanding of the subject (as given by the content of your paper), as well as on style, neatness, and attention to the details of writing.  Be sure to use appropriate referencing in proper ACS style.  Do not reference internet sites.

o   Paper 1

Paper 1 is an essay about a controversial topic derived from readings.  It should be no more than 500 words and demonstrate a point of view on the topic.  It is graded only on style, neatness, and on attention to details of writing, not on content.

o   Paper 2

Paper 2 is the major paper in this course. It should range from 2000 to 3000 words in length. Each student is randomly assigned a topic (perhaps the name of some person in the history of physical chemistry), on which he/she must write an original paper based on the person's life or on some incident in physical chemistry with which he/she is involved. It must be original in content.  It must use careful writing style, adhering to the rules of grammar and organization.  The paper is given a provisional grade and returned to the student; a student may return a rewritten version of the paper for additional credit, or accept the provisional grade as the final grade (by not returning a revised version).

o   Paper 3

This paper is a short (no more than two pages) exposition of a topic in the history of physical chemistry.  It must be clear, concise, and complete.  The topic is chosen by the student and must be original.  It will be graded on both style, content, and originality.

 

BECAUSE STUDENTS HAVE SUFFICIENT TIME TO COMPLETE ALL ASSIGNMENTS, THERE ARE NO INCOMPLETES IN THIS CLASS.


Class Attendance and Participation

Attendance is mandatory and is checked each class period.  Absences are excused only for illness or university-approved activities (sports or band, for example). Exams, homework or quizzes missed because of an unexcused absence are given grades of zero.   Not only is attendance mandatory, but participation in the discussion is a determinant of your grade.  (See below.)  Assignments are due on specific days, and will not be accepted later than that, except for excused absences.


Grading

Grade Weights

 

o   Writing sample, 5%

o   Paper 1, 5%

o   Paper 2, 20% (10% for outline; 10% for the final paper)

o   Paper 3, 10%

o   Each exam, 25%

o   Class attendance and participation, 10%

Grade Cutoffs (in percentages of total points)

o   A greater than 90%

o   B greater than 80%

o   C greater than 70%

o   D greater than 60%

o   F below 60%


Assignments

Week

Dates

Topic(s)

Reading

Writing

1

8/27 and 8/29

Writing, grammar, and style

Laidler 1

 

2

9/3 and 9/5

Physical chemistry; the meaning of research; philosophies of science; physical science before the 1880s; communication

Laidler 1

Writing sample due 9/3

3

9/10 and 9/12

Early physics and chemistry

Laidler 2

4

9/17 and 9/19

Early physical science

Laidler 3

Writing sample revision due 9/17

5

9/24 and 9/26

Thermodynamics; library searches

Laidler 4

Paper 1 due 9/24;

9/26: Morris Library 106 A

6

10/1 and 10/3

Thermodynamics; Absolute Zero

Laidler 4

Paper 2 Assignment

7

10/8 and 10/10

Race for Absolute Zero; statistical theories

Laidler 5

Paper 1 revision due by 10/8

8

10/15 and 10/17

Bunsen, Kirchoff, and chemical spectroscopy

Laidler 6

Paper 2 outline due 10/18

9

10/22 and 10/24

Electrochemistry and the Ionists

Laidler 7

EXAM 1, Oct 24

10

10/29 and 10/31

Chemical kinetics; Americans in Europe

Laidler 8

Servos 1,2

 

11

11/5 and 11/7

Ostwald’s Americans, rise of physical chemistry in America; Noyes’ laboratory at MIT

Servos 3,4

Topic of paper 3 and outline due 11/7

12

11/12 and 11/14

Bancroft’s laboratory at Cornell, Noyes laboratory at Caltech

Servos 4, 5, 6, 7

13

11/19 and 11/21

Industrial basic research

Servos 6

NO CLASS, 11/19, Paper 2 due 11/21

14

11/26

Quantum chemistry and modern physical chemistry

Laidler 10

P aper 3 due 11/26

15

12/3

Second Examination

EXAM 2, 12/3



Copyright, Cecil Dybowski, 1998-2013.
Last Updated: November 4, 2013.
This page maintained by Cecil Dybowski.
URL of this document: http://www.udel.edu/pchem/C410/c410.htm