MUSEUM
INFORMATION

 

Hours:
Wed-Sun 12:00-5:00 pm
Thur - 12:00-8:00 pm
Closed during University breaks and holidays

Main Phone:
302-831-8037

universitymuseums@udel.edu

 

MECHANICAL HALL GALLERY

30 North College Ave.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mechanical Hall Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-8088 (Museum)

 

MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM

255 Academy St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mineralogical Museum is in Perkins Garage located on Academy Street.

Phone:
302-831-6557 (Curator)
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-4940 (Museum)

 

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

18 East Main St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Old College Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-6589 (Museum)

 

 

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“ We made the
UD Bucket List!”

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

Unknown artist, English, Lady Frances Knowles (?), ca. 1660-80. Oil on canvas. Gift of Ellen du Pont Wheelwright

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (1884-1976), Head of a Woman, 1915. Woodcut. University Museums

Attributed to Hiram Powers (1805-1873), Cyrus Field 1849 (?). Painted plaster. Gift of Miss Margaret Downs.

Faces of the Collection

February 12 – June 28, 2014

Presenting and re-presenting works from the University Collection, this exhibition explores the diversity of the collection through the theme of “Faces.” The Oxford English Dictionary offers a wide range of meanings:  the front of the head of a human or an animal; a person, as in a “familiar face;” a representation of the face in art; or even a slang greeting for someone whose name has been forgotten.  But, when faces are transformed into art, other questions emerge.  What makes a face a portrait?  What do portraits reveal about their sitters, their creators, and their historical contexts?  What is the difference between a portrait and a mask?  What makes a face human? All of these questions and more come into play in this exhibition, the first in a series that will use selected themes as means of exploring the collection.  

A Roman portrait bust comes into dialogue with Andy Warhol, and a mid-nineteenth-century American man of means converses with the 1963 wire sculpture Miscegenation by Hayward Oubré, Jr.; a self-portrait by the American artist Concetta Scaravaglione is brought into play with a second century mummy portrait; a self-portrait by the Austrian expressionist Oskar Kokoschka and the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros.  Beyond questions of representation, this exhibition seeks to introduce viewers to a wide range of media used by artists through time. Sculptures range from marble to wire to plaster; paintings from encaustic, to oil on canvas, to gouache; prints from drypoint to lithography to polaroid.  

During fall semester 2012, with the support of the College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Humanities Research Center, a group of faculty and staff met regularly to discuss new ways of looking at the University Museums’ collections. This exhibition, organized by a team of the University Museums staff, is indebted to those discussions.
  • University of Delaware   •   Newark, DE 19716   •   USA
    Phone: (302) 831-2792   •   © 2011