MUSEUM
INFORMATION

University Museums are closed for summer break.

 

Information on fall 2014 exhibitions and programming will be posted by August 1.

 

All University Museums will reopen on September 3.

 

Hours:
Wed-Sun 12:00-5:00 pm
Thur - 12:00-8:00 pm
Closed during University breaks and holidays

Main Phone:
302-831-8037

universitymuseums@udel.edu

 

MECHANICAL HALL GALLERY

30 North College Ave.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mechanical Hall Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-8088 (Museum)

 

MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM

255 Academy St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mineralogical Museum is in Perkins Garage located on Academy Street.

Phone:
302-831-6557 (Curator)
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-4940 (Museum)

 

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

18 East Main St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Old College Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-6589 (Museum)

 

 

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“ We made the
UD Bucket List!”

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

Unknown artist, English, Lady Frances Knowles (?), ca. 1660-80. Oil on canvas. Gift of Ellen du Pont Wheelwright

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (1884-1976), Head of a Woman, 1915. Woodcut. University Museums

Attributed to Hiram Powers (1805-1873), Cyrus Field 1849 (?). Painted plaster. Gift of Miss Margaret Downs.

Faces of the Collection

February 12 – June 28, 2014

Presenting and re-presenting works from the University Collection, this exhibition explores the diversity of the collection through the theme of “Faces.” The Oxford English Dictionary offers a wide range of meanings:  the front of the head of a human or an animal; a person, as in a “familiar face;” a representation of the face in art; or even a slang greeting for someone whose name has been forgotten.  But, when faces are transformed into art, other questions emerge.  What makes a face a portrait?  What do portraits reveal about their sitters, their creators, and their historical contexts?  What is the difference between a portrait and a mask?  What makes a face human? All of these questions and more come into play in this exhibition, the first in a series that will use selected themes as means of exploring the collection.  

A Roman portrait bust comes into dialogue with Andy Warhol, and a mid-nineteenth-century American man of means converses with the 1963 wire sculpture Miscegenation by Hayward Oubré, Jr.; a self-portrait by the American artist Concetta Scaravaglione is brought into play with a second century mummy portrait; a self-portrait by the Austrian expressionist Oskar Kokoschka and the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros.  Beyond questions of representation, this exhibition seeks to introduce viewers to a wide range of media used by artists through time. Sculptures range from marble to wire to plaster; paintings from encaustic, to oil on canvas, to gouache; prints from drypoint to lithography to polaroid.  

During fall semester 2012, with the support of the College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Humanities Research Center, a group of faculty and staff met regularly to discuss new ways of looking at the University Museums’ collections. This exhibition, organized by a team of the University Museums staff, is indebted to those discussions.
  • University of Delaware   •   Newark, DE 19716   •   USA
    Phone: (302) 831-2792   •   © 2011