MUSEUM
INFORMATION

All exhibition and program information is up-to-date for fall semester 2014. Download our latest Exhibitions and Programs Bulletin here (PDF).

 

Hours:
Wed-Sun 12:00-5:00 pm
Thur - 12:00-8:00 pm
Closed during University breaks and holidays

Main Phone:
302-831-8037

universitymuseums@udel.edu

 

MECHANICAL HALL GALLERY

30 North College Ave.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mechanical Hall Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-8088 (Museum)

 

MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM

255 Academy St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mineralogical Museum is in Perkins Garage located on Academy Street.

Phone:
302-831-6557 (Curator)
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-4940 (Museum)

 

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

18 East Main St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Old College Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-6589 (Museum)

 

 

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“ We made the
UD Bucket List!”

MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM

Malachite, Shilu Mine, Guangdong Province, China

Celestine, Meckley’s Quarry, Mandata, Northumberland Co, Pennsylvania

Recent Gifts

September 4 – December 8, 2013

The Mineralogical Museum is actively building its collection of minerals by the addition of both historic specimens and newly collected material. Our collection continues to grow, thanks to the generosity of donors: over the past five years, more than 100 new specimens have entered the Museum.  This exhibition features recent acquisitions many of which are on public view for the first time.

Mined in the late 1980’s, during the early development of copper mining in China,  the velvety green malachite from the Shilu Mine, Guangdong Province, brings to the collection a  malachite specimen from a locality not previously represented. The discovery of deposits of malachite and azurite in the process of mining copper is not unique to China. During the 1880’s in Bisbee, Arizona, mining also brought to light near surface specimens of malachite and azurite, both highly valued by collectors.  Because of the mining managers’ general tolerance of miners collecting specimens on company time, hundreds of significant collections were formed. The recently gifted azurite from the Copper Queen Mine, Bisbee, Arizona commemorates this historic time.

In the late 1960s, zoisite was discovered in a blue gem variety in the Arusha region of Tanzania near Mount Kilimanjaro. Because it was thought that sales might be impacted negatively by a name that sounded like “suicide,” when Tiffany & Company first marketed these gems they  were given the varietal name “tanzanite” after the country of origin. The Merelani Mines of the Arusha region have produced thousands of tanzanite crystals, some of which are collected in their natural state and others are cut into gemstones.  Forty years after that original discovery gem quality green diopside, a mineral that usually forms opaque dark green blocky crystals, were found in the same mine. A recent gift of one brings to our collection an outstanding and a more beautiful specimen of diopside than most have seen.

[Picture] Although our regional collection includes Delaware and Maryland specimens, the emphasis is on Pennsylvania minerals because deposits in Delaware and Maryland are limited.  The rich pale blue celestine from the Meckley Quarry in Mandata, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania illustrates a recent find and the euhedral hexagonal brucite is a specimen collected in the mid 1800’s.

Perspective on Recent Gifts
Wednesday, October 30 ~ 12:30 – 1:15 pm
Sharon Fitzgerald, Curator, Mineralogical Museum
Location: Mineralogical Museum.

  • University of Delaware   •   Newark, DE 19716   •   USA
    Phone: (302) 831-2792   •   © 2011