MUSEUM
INFORMATION

All exhibition and program information is up-to-date for fall semester 2014. Download our latest Exhibitions and Programs Bulletin here (PDF).

 

Hours:
Wed-Sun 12:00-5:00 pm
Thur - 12:00-8:00 pm
Closed during University breaks and holidays

Main Phone:
302-831-8037

universitymuseums@udel.edu

 

MECHANICAL HALL GALLERY

30 North College Ave.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mechanical Hall Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-8088 (Museum)

 

MINERALOGICAL MUSEUM

255 Academy St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Mineralogical Museum is in Perkins Garage located on Academy Street.

Phone:
302-831-6557 (Curator)
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-4940 (Museum)

 

OLD COLLEGE GALLERY

18 East Main St.
Newark, DE 19716

Directions

Parking:
Parking for the Old College Gallery is in Trabant University Center Garage located between Delaware Avenue and Main St.

Phone:
302-831-8037 (Information)
302-831-6589 (Museum)

 

 

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“ We made the
UD Bucket List!”

OLD COLLEGE WEST GALLERY

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1862). Japanese Warrior Kashiwade no Hanoshi Kills a Tiger in Korea, 1830-32. From series: Eight Hundred Heroes of the Water Margin of Japan, Courtesy Hong Gyu Shin

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-92). Inagami Daikuro, Kato Masakiyo, Iida Sakubei, Kato Kiyobei and Shobayashi Hayato in battle at Shinshu Castle in Korea, 1863, Courtesy Hong Gyu Shin

Anonymous. Harada Jukichi climbing the Genbu Gate at Pyongyang, October 1894, Courtesy Hong Gyu Shin

From Samurai to Soldier: Japanese Prints of War

September 4 – December 8, 2013

The mention of Japanese woodblock prints, or ukiyo-e  (literally “floating-world pictures”) usually evokes images of serene landscapes, famous Japanese landmarks and beautiful women. 
Drastically different, yet equally popular, were the thousands of images of warriors and war produced by Japanese print designers and publishers throughout the nineteenth century for a public enthralled by their dynamic compositions, heightened action, and depictions of both remarkable heroism and bloody violence.

This exhibition presents musha-e, prints of warriors, from the Edo Period (1603-1868) and early Meiji Period (1868-1912), and sensō-e, scenes of contemporary war, from the Meiji Period. In addition to demonstrating the technical dexterity and compositional innovation of the many artists who generated these highly popular images, these prints serve as documents of a turbulent and drastically changing period of Japanese history. Sometimes veiled in historic imagery, sometimes explicitly contemporary, each of these prints reflects the political turmoil, imperial aspirations, and contentious relationship with the west that characterized the waning years of the Edo Period and the explosive transition to the Meiji Restoration.

The nineteen prints on view were generously lent by Hong Gyu Shin (University of Delaware, 2013). In addition to his interests as a collector, Hong Gyu opened the Shin Gallery in New York City in January 2013, dedicated to contemporary Korean art (www.shin-gallery.com).

Anna Juliar, Ph.D. Student, Art History, was the Research Assistant for the University Museums from 2012-13. She is currently The Margaret R. Mainwaring Curatorial Fellow in the Prints, Drawings, and Photographs Department at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • University of Delaware   •   Newark, DE 19716   •   USA
    Phone: (302) 831-2792   •   © 2011