Standard UD Web header

Department of Kinesiology & Applied Physiology

arrows

Resources

faculty

Faculty & Staff

Vascular Physiology Laboratory

Vascular Physiology Lab Group

Researchers in the Vascular Physiology Lab study vascular function and dysfunction in healthy and diseased states, using a variety of techniques to examine macro- and microvascular function as well as arterial stiffness.

Lab Personnel

PI: Dave Edwards, PhD
Associate Professor

Kathy Masso, BS, RDMS
Lab Coordinator

Danielle Kirkman, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow

Kenneth Kirschner, MS
Associate Scientist

Kimberly Ashton, MS
Exercise Physiologist

Meghan Ramick, BS
PhD student, Applied Physiology

Bryce Muth, MS
PhD student, Applied Physiology

Charles Brodowski
Undergraduate Summer Scholar
Exercise Science

 
     

Research Focus

The focus of the Vascular Physiology Lab is studying vascular function/dysfunction in healthy and diseased states, with particular emphasis on chronic kidney disease. A variety of techniques are utilized to examine macro- and microvascular function as well as arterial stiffness in humans and animal models.

Current Projects

Studies in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)
A) Mechanisms of impaired vascular function in CKD
The lab is currently investigating the mechanisms of impaired vascular function in CKD. These patients are at particularly high risk for cardiovascular events and death, more so than would be predicted from traditional risk factors. We are currently conducting studies in patients with CKD utilizing a variety of techniques to assess vascular function.

More recently, we have begun studies utilizing the 5/6 ablation/infarction model of CKD to gain better understanding of impaired vascular and cardiac dysfunction in this disease state.

B) Exercise Training in CKD
The lab is currently assessing the effect of exercise training on vascular and cardiac dysfunction in the 5/6 ablation/infarction model of CKD. Exercise training studies in patients with CKD are also planned.

Vascular Effects of Dietary Salt in Humans with Salt-Resistant BP
In collaboration with Dr. Bill Farquhar and his Cardiovascular Research Lab, we are exploring the effects of dietary salt on vascular function. Our hypothesis is that excess dietary salt adversely affects vascular function, independent of blood pressure.
We also collaborate with faculty from Medical Technology and Nursing. Collaborations outside the University include Christiana Care, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and the University of Colorado.

Funding for these studies currently comes from the National Institutes of Health and the American College of Sports Medicine

Recent Publications

  • DuPont JJ, Greaney JL, Wenner MM, Lennon-Edwards SL, Sanders PW, Farquhar WB, and Edwards DG. Dietary sodium loading impairs endothelial-dependent dilation independent of changes in blood pressure in humans. J Hypertens (In review, June 2012).
  • Greaney JL, DuPont JJ, Lennon-Edwards SL, Sanders PW, Farquhar WB, Edwards DG. Dietary sodium loading impairs microvascular function independent of blood pressure in humans: role of oxidative stress. J Physiol. (In review, June 2012)
  • DuPont JJ, Farquhar WB, Townsend RR, Edwards DG. Ascorbic acid or L-arginine improves cutaneous microvascular function in chronic kidney disease. J Appl Physiol. 2011. 111(6):1561-7.
  • DuPont JJ, Farquhar WB, Edwards DG. Intradermal microdialysis of hypertonic saline attenuates cutaneous vasodilation in response to local heating. Exp Physiol. 2011. 96(7):674-80.
  • Kuczmarski JM, Darocki MD, DuPont JJ, Sikes RA, Cooper CR, Farquhar WB, Edwards DG. The effect of moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease on flow mediated dilation and progenitor cells. Exp. Biol. Med. 2011. 236(9):1085-92.
  • Christopher R. Martens and David G. Edwards, “Peripheral Vascular Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease,” Cardiology Research and Practice, vol. 2011, Article ID 267257, 9 pages, 2011. doi:10.4061/2011/267257


  • College of Health Sciences  •   Department of Kinesiology & Applied Physiology  •   541 South College Ave.
    Newark, DE 19716    •   Phone: 302-831-2937  •  kaap-info@udel.edu   •  © 2014
    Comments   |    Contact Us    |    Legal Notices