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Todd D. Royer

Todd D. Royer

Associate Professor
Kinesiology & Applied Physiology
201R CHS STAR campus
302-831-4351
royer@udel.edu

 

 

 


Research Interests

  • Biomechanics and energetics of gait
  • Amputee locomotion
  • Knee osteoarthritis

Education

  • Ph.D., Arizona State University, 1999
  • M.S., University of Delaware, 1993
  • B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1987

Professional Experience

  • 2006-present, Associate Professor, University of Delaware
  • 2000-present, Assistant Professor, University of Delaware
  • 1999-2000, Assistant Professor, Tulane University

Courses

  • HESC 425, Biomechanics of Human Motion
  • HESC 426, Biomechanics I
  • HESC 687, Seminar in Biomechanics
  • HESC 688, Electromyographic Kinesiology

Selected Recent Publications

  • Crenshaw, S.J., Royer, T.D., Richards, J.G., and Hudson, D.J. Gait variability in people with multiple sclerosis (in press, Multiple Sclerosis).
  • Royer, T.D. and Wasilewski, C.A. (2006) Hip and knee frontal plane moments in persons with unilateral, trans-tibial amputation. Gait and Posture. 23(3), 303-306.
  • Royer, T.D. and Koenig, M.D. (2005) Joint loading and bone mineral density in persons with unilateral, trans-tibial amputation. Clinical Biomechanics. 20(10), 1119-1125.
  • Royer, T.D. (2005) Electromyography and muscle force: caution ahead. Athletic Therapy Today. 10(4), 43-45.
  • Royer, T.D. and Martin, P.E. (2005) Manipulations of leg mass and moment of inertia: effects on energy cost of walking. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 37(4), 649-656.

Recent Funding

  • NIH - Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (Todd Royer, PI for project #3; Irene Davis, co-PI), $931,815; "Effect of In-Shoe Orthoses on Lower-Extremity Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis"; (2002-07) P20 RR16458 (Tom Buchanan PI for the COBRE center grant)

Current Research

  • We are currently investigating 1) secondary disability of lower-extremity amputation (e.g., gait asymmetry, increased metabolic cost of locomotion, increased risk of joint degradation) and 2) a conservative in-shoe wedged orthotic treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

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