An Excavation Unit Study: N229 W61

 

This unit is located in the far northwest corner of the Read House Property. It is 2.5 feet wide and 5 feet long.

What was found in this unit:

 

Level 26, fill of 27:

       Ceramics

       Glass

       Nails

       Brick

       Bone

 

Level 24, fill of 25:

       Bone

       Nails

       Ceramics;

 

Level 20, fill of 21:

       Firebrick

Level 19:

       Nail

       Iron

       Brick

       Porcelain

       Ceramic

Level 18:

       Glass

       Ceramics

       Nail

       Iron

Level 17:

       Ceramics

       Nail

       Iron

       Glass

Level 16:

       Ceramics

Level 15:

       Plaster

       Ceramic

       Glass

       Nails

Level 14:

       Nail

       Iron

Level 13:

       Nails

       Iron

       Ceramics

Level 12:

       Ceramics

       Window latch base

       Glass

Level 11:

       Glass

       Bone

       Ceramics

Level 10:

       Pipe

       Ceramics

Level 9:

       Feature

Level 8, fill of 9:

       Fill

Level 7:

       Slag

       Dry cell

       Charcoal

       Nails

       Iron

       Slate

       Mammal

       Glass

       Copper

Level 6:

       Window

       Lamp

       Tile

       Ceramic insulator

       Nails

       Iron

       Charcoal

       Slate

       Glass

       Tooth fragments

       Ceramics

       Granite

Level 5:

       Glass

       Nails

       Charcoal

       Bone

       Ceramic

Level 3:

       Iron

       Ceramic

Level 2:

       Glass

       Nail

       Cement

 

 

What do these findings say?

 

Sometimes objects such as ceramics can help to date an entire level. These ceramics are especially useful if their decorations can help narrow the time period of production. For example, level 26 contained three pieces of ceramics: a lead glazed Redware that dates from 1630-1940, a piece of Tin Glazed from 1630-1780 and a piece of English Agate that dates from 1740-1775. The English Agate is the youngest, level 26 was not created before 1740, and that would only be if the plate was bought new, broken, and thrown out all in the same year.

 

-Researched by: Chris Green

 

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