DRC-Disaster Research Center

Active Studies

 

 

COT Institute for Safety, Security and Crisis Management, “Learning from a Large Scale Flood Exercise in the Netherlands

Principal Investigators: Sue McNeil (PI), Joseph Trainor (Co-PI) with Jack Harrald (Virgina Tech), Greg Shaw (George Washington University,) Uri Rosenthal (COT), Marco Zanonni (COT), Karen Engle (COT)
Undergraduate Research Assistant: Ashley Horan
Funding Agencies: COT Institute for Safety, Security and Crisis Management (Netherlands)

Study Description

In this project the University of Delaware research team will focus on the behavioural aspects of flood prepareness, response and recovery. This includes such as reaction to warning signals, evacuation, risk perception, and interactions among and within organziations from the perspective of citizens, public sector (including professionals), private sector and other organizations. The University of Delaware research team’s research will also provide input to the work of other collaborating institutions on Emergency and Crisis Management (George Washington University); and Crisis-communication/media (University of Colorado at Boulder).

A preliminary literature review will identify relevant process and a set of best practices and possible complexities. The literature research will then be complemented by a ‘case study’, namely the Dutch flood-exercise week organised by the Flood Management Taskforce (TMO, Taskforce Management Overstromingen) in November 2008. Throughout this week the literature will be linked to the simulated exercise on flood management. The exercise will give a unique context to assess the relevance and applicability of US based literature to the Dutch issues and context. This is not an evaluation of the exercise but a mechanism for linking past knowledge to current experiences.

Throughout the case study the following questions will be addressed:

  • Are the identified key processes of flood management visible in the exercise?
  • What do these key processes entail in practice?
  • Are best practices as described throughout the literature applied?
  • Do the best practices applied in the exercise function as expected based on reported experiences in the literature?
  • How do the applied best practices affect the exercise?
  • Do the complexities as proposed throughout the literature become apparent?
  • How do the observed complexities influence the exercise?

To provide insights relevant to future actions, the literature review will be explicitly linked to the case-study. The next step is therefore to evaluate to what extent the observations of the case-study reflect the experiences reported in the literature. If inconsistencies are encountered, it will be important to consider why these inconsistencies have emerged and how these inconsistencies affect our knowledge base regarding flood disaster management.

 

Study Related Publications

Trainor, Joseph and Sue McNeil. 2008.A Brief Summary of Social Science Warning and Response Literature” Report to COT Institute for Safety, Security and Crisis Management

Trainor, Joseph and Sue McNeil. 2008.A Brief Summary of Search and Rescue Literature. Report to COT Institute for Safety, Security and Crisis Management

Trainor, Joseph E., Sue McNeil, Jack Harrald, and Greg Shaw. 2008. Learning from a
Large Scale Flood “Waterproef” Exercise in the Netherlands: Preliminary Observations Report to COT Institute for Safety, Security and Crisis Management